A black and white photo of a woman in a plumed hat in a laboratory classroom with several men
Birth of The Pill, 1956–1960
Researchers overseeing the clinical trial for the first FDA-approved oral contraceptive claimed the drug gave the Puerto Rican participants power over their family planning. Critics claimed the women were exploited.
Birth of The Pill, 1956–1960
Birth of The Pill, 1956–1960

Researchers overseeing the clinical trial for the first FDA-approved oral contraceptive claimed the drug gave the Puerto Rican participants power over their family planning. Critics claimed the women were exploited.

Researchers overseeing the clinical trial for the first FDA-approved oral contraceptive claimed the drug gave the Puerto Rican participants power over their family planning. Critics claimed the women were exploited.

reproductive health
Temporary fencing placed in front of the US Supreme Court building, which is in the background
Scientists Predict “Brain Drain” From States That Ban Abortion
Dan Robitzski | Jun 30, 2022
Following the overturning of Roe v. Wade, numerous researchers have announced plans to either vacate or decline career opportunities in states where abortion is or will soon be illegal.
Ctrl+C and Ctrl+V computer keyboard button with cable isolated on white background
Opinion: The Reproductive Technology Advances No One Asked For
John D. Loike and Alan Kadish | Jun 22, 2022
Cloning and parthenogenesis of humans wouldn’t align with bioethical principles.
Female reproductive System Anatomy stock photo
Cells in the Ovary are Responsive Shape-Shifters
Roni Dengler, PhD | Apr 8, 2022
Rounds of trial-and-error exploring the layer of cells covering the ovary leave open questions about stem cells that are associated with ovarian cancer.
A New View of My Own Past
Jef Akst | Aug 1, 2021
Hearing others’ perspectives on infertility and pregnancy has me reconsidering my own reproductive journey.
A collection of headshots
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | Aug 1, 2021
Meet some of the people featured in the August 2021 issue of The Scientist.
Pink background with menstrual products off to the right
No Proof COVID-19 Vaccine Affects Menstruation or Fertility
Lisa Winter | Apr 27, 2021
Following vaccination, some women claim their periods have changed, leading to rumors about how the shots affect recipients’ reproductive systems, and even others’ by proxy.