Green fish in front of bottom of boat
The Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill’s Hidden Impacts on Mahi-Mahi      
Mahi-mahi were more likely to be eaten and less likely to spawn after being exposed to sublethal concentrations of oil, raising concerns about the risks oceanic drilling pose to life in the ocean.
The Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill’s Hidden Impacts on Mahi-Mahi      
The Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill’s Hidden Impacts on Mahi-Mahi      

Mahi-mahi were more likely to be eaten and less likely to spawn after being exposed to sublethal concentrations of oil, raising concerns about the risks oceanic drilling pose to life in the ocean.

Mahi-mahi were more likely to be eaten and less likely to spawn after being exposed to sublethal concentrations of oil, raising concerns about the risks oceanic drilling pose to life in the ocean.

satellite tagging
sharks, blue shark, Prionace glauca, overfishing, ocean deoxygenation, climate change
Climate Change Could Drive Sharks to Fishing Grounds: Study
Asher Jones | Jan 28, 2021
Blue sharks don't dive as deeply in low-oxygen waters—which become more prevalent as oceans warm—effectively pushing them into areas of high fishing pressure.
drifting seabirds the scientist
GPS-Tagged Seabirds Track the Tides
Jef Akst | Mar 1, 2019
Birds drifting on the surface of the sea could provide valuable data for oceanographers.
Researchers Track Eels on Their Cross-Atlantic Migration
Catherine Offord | Jan 1, 2017
A mysterious migration is coming to light after more than a century of study.
Eel-ucidating A Fishy Mystery
The Scientist Staff | Dec 31, 2016
Researchers are using high-tech solutions to bring the lifecycle of the European eel into sharper focus.
Sealing the Deal
The Scientist Staff | Oct 31, 2016
Irish researchers convert seals into remote oceanographic sensors by attaching tags containing temperature probes and other technologies to their heads.
Orca Death Spurs Reevaluation of Satellite Tagging
Bob Grant | Oct 10, 2016
A cetacean succumbed to a fungal infection shortly after being darted by researchers seeking to learn more about the species’ migrations and population dynamics.