scientific ethics
Hot Off the Presses
Hot Off the Presses
Bob Grant | Aug 1, 2016
Idiot Brain, Wild Sex, Why Diets Make Us Fat, and The Ethics of Invention
When Does a Smart Mouse Become Human?
When Does a Smart Mouse Become Human?
John D. Loike | Jul 1, 2015
Ethical issues attend the creation of animal-human chimeras.
Keeping Science Pubs Clean
Keeping Science Pubs Clean
Jef Akst | Jun 29, 2015
Science releases new guidelines for research transparency, hoping to stem the tide of retractions and misconduct.
Retractions Often Due to Plagiarism: Study
Retractions Often Due to Plagiarism: Study
Kerry Grens | Jun 2, 2015
The number of plagiarism-based retractions has grown since the advent of detection software, according to a BioMed Central analysis.
Opinion: Public Data, Private Concerns
Opinion: Public Data, Private Concerns
Viviane Callier | May 20, 2015
Research participants aren’t always clear on open data policies when consenting to studies.
NIH Opposes Editing Human Embryos
NIH Opposes Editing Human Embryos
Jef Akst | Apr 30, 2015
Following the publication of a study in which scientists used CRISPR to edit nonviable human embryos, the National Institutes of Health states it will not fund such research.
Johns Hopkins Sued for Guatemala Experiments
Johns Hopkins Sued for Guatemala Experiments
Tracy Vence | Apr 2, 2015
The university is among defendants listed on a lawsuit filed this week by participants in controversial experiments conducted in Guatemala in the 1940s.
Call for Germline Editing Moratorium
Call for Germline Editing Moratorium
Jef Akst | Mar 13, 2015
In response to speculation that groups have edited the DNA of human embryos, researchers request that gene editing of human reproductive cells be halted.
Loaded Words
Loaded Words
John D. Loike | Dec 1, 2014
As new technologies emerge, we must choose our words for them with care: names can negatively bias the inevitable debates over the ethics of scientific advances.
Study: Scientists Witness Plagiarism Often
Study: Scientists Witness Plagiarism Often
Kerry Grens | Nov 3, 2014
A meta-analysis of surveys used to gauge plagiarism among scientists finds that nearly one-third of researchers have witnessed the problem.