skin cancer
Cancer-Fighting Chemical Found in Human Skin Bacteria
Cancer-Fighting Chemical Found in Human Skin Bacteria
Diana Kwon | Mar 1, 2018
A molecule produced by a strain of Staphylococcus epidermis interferes with DNA synthesis.
Image of the Day: Sun Burn
Image of the Day: Sun Burn
The Scientist Staff | Oct 20, 2017
When certain melanocyte stem cells are exposed to UV rays, a molecular cascade can trigger melanoma, scientists find in mice.
Image of the Day: Manipulative Melanomas
Image of the Day: Manipulative Melanomas
The Scientist Staff | Mar 19, 2017
Early-stage melanoma cells alter proteins in nearby skin cells to create a favorable environment for cancer progression.
“Redhead” Gene Variant Boosts Melanoma Risk
“Redhead” Gene Variant Boosts Melanoma Risk
Tanya Lewis | Jul 12, 2016
People without red hair who possess the variant are also more likely to develop this form of skin cancer, researchers report.
Fuchs on the Future
Fuchs on the Future
The Scientist Staff | May 1, 2016
Rockefeller University researcher Elaine Fuchs on being a woman in science and her contributions to the burgeoning field of reverse genetics
Antioxidants Facilitate Melanoma Metastasis
Antioxidants Facilitate Melanoma Metastasis
Anna Azvolinsky | Oct 7, 2015
Two compounds boost the ability of melanoma cells to invade other tissues in mice, providing additional evidence that antioxidants can be beneficial to malignant cells as well as healthy ones.
Cancer-Driving Mutations Common in Normal Skin Cells
Cancer-Driving Mutations Common in Normal Skin Cells
Anna Azvolinsky | May 21, 2015
A deep-sequencing analysis reveals that non-malignant skin cells harbor many more cancer-driving mutations than previously expected. 
The Dark Side of Melanin
The Dark Side of Melanin
Anna Azvolinsky | Feb 19, 2015
Researchers uncover a previously unknown way UV light can act on melanin, spurring cancer-causing mutations hours after sun exposure.
Testicular-Skin Cancer Tradeoff
Testicular-Skin Cancer Tradeoff
Bob Grant | Oct 14, 2013
A genetic mutation tied to risk of developing testicular cancer may be more prevalent in white men because it also confers a reduced risk of developing skin cancer.
Blue Whales Get Tans
Blue Whales Get Tans
Kate Yandell | Sep 2, 2013
The large mammals alter the levels of melanin in their skin depending on sun exposure, helping them to avoid DNA damage.