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A collection of images from prior stories, including illustrations of DNA, chromosomes, and various cells, microscopy images of cancer cells, and a photo of a mouse on a treadmill.
Our Favorite Cancer Stories of 2022
This year, cancer researchers uncovered a variety of ways that tumors can survive and spread, ranging from damaging their own DNA to exploiting the nearby microenvironment for nutrients.
Our Favorite Cancer Stories of 2022
Our Favorite Cancer Stories of 2022

This year, cancer researchers uncovered a variety of ways that tumors can survive and spread, ranging from damaging their own DNA to exploiting the nearby microenvironment for nutrients.

This year, cancer researchers uncovered a variety of ways that tumors can survive and spread, ranging from damaging their own DNA to exploiting the nearby microenvironment for nutrients.

squamous cell carcinoma
Micrograph image of cancer cells stained violet.
Oral Cancer Survives Starvation with Help from Nearby Nerves
Dan Robitzski | Nov 16, 2022 | 3 min read
Human and mouse oral tumors recruit nerves to produce peptides that the cancer cells need to survive—but this process can be blocked with a migraine drug.
istock lung cancer
Precision Medicine Turns to Proteins for Lung Cancer Targets
Roni Dengler, PhD | Nov 9, 2021 | 2 min read
Probing the protein landscape in lung cancers reveals new therapeutic insights.
More Than Skin Deep
Anna Azvolinsky | May 1, 2016 | 9 min read
Elaine Fuchs has worked on adult stem cells since before they were so named, figuring out how multipotent epidermal cells renew or turn into skin or hair follicles.
Fuchs on the Future
The Scientist Staff | Apr 30, 2016 | 1 min read
Rockefeller University researcher Elaine Fuchs on being a woman in science and her contributions to the burgeoning field of reverse genetics
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