salmonella bacteria 3d illustration
Salmonella Injection Helps the Mouse Immune System Kill Tumors
Nanoparticle-coated bacteria can capture tumor antigens and deliver them to immune cells, triggering a response that improved survival rates in mice.
Salmonella Injection Helps the Mouse Immune System Kill Tumors
Salmonella Injection Helps the Mouse Immune System Kill Tumors

Nanoparticle-coated bacteria can capture tumor antigens and deliver them to immune cells, triggering a response that improved survival rates in mice.

Nanoparticle-coated bacteria can capture tumor antigens and deliver them to immune cells, triggering a response that improved survival rates in mice.

tumor antigens
Illustration showing how following radiation therapy, which triggers the release of cancer-specific antigens, researchers injected Salmonella typhimurium bacteria covered in positively charged nano- particles near tumors in mice.
Infographic: Salmonella Shuttle Tumor Antigens to Immune Cells
Dan Robitzski | May 16, 2022
Nanoparticle-coated bacteria carry cancer-derived proteins to dendritic cells, enabling the immune system to launch a response in a mouse model.
A stained tissue sample of metastatic pancreatic cancer
Tetanus Immunity Protects Mice Against Pancreatic Cancer
Amanda Heidt | Mar 24, 2022
Because most people are vaccinated against tetanus as children, delivering benign bacteria carrying a tetanus antigen into pancreatic tumors makes them visible to memory cells in the immune system, researchers report.
Discover How to Accelerate and Improve CAR-T therapy development
Advances in Solid Tumor Immunotherapies
Sartorius | Oct 6, 2021
By screening for novel tumor targets, researchers build better CAR-T cell therapies.
Enhancing the Efficacy of CAR-T Cell Therapies
The Scientist Creative Services Team in Collaboration with IsoPlexis | Jun 29, 2021
Jessica Morris will discuss strategies to improve CAR-T cell targeting, activation, and killing capabilities.
Bispecific Antibodies Treat Cancer in Mouse Models
Abby Olena | Mar 5, 2021
A trio of papers shows that specialized antibodies can direct T cells to destroy cells that display portions of mutant cancer-related proteins, as well as T cells that have become cancerous themselves.
CAR T cells, oncolytic virus, CD19, mouse model, solid cancer, liquid cancer, tumor, immune response, immunotherapy, T cell, treatment
Immunotherapy Combo Reduces Solid Tumors in Mice
Amanda Heidt | Sep 9, 2020
When tumor cells are infected with an oncolytic virus carrying a modified CD19 gene, they become targets for CAR T cells engineered to recognize this molecular marker.
dendritic cell t cell immunology cancer immunotherapy in situ vaccine
In Situ Vaccination: A Cancer Treatment a Century in the Making
Emma Yasinski | Jul 25, 2019
Injecting immunostimulants directly into the tumor is not a new strategy to stimulate the immune system, but the approach has seen a surge of interest in recent years.
Tracking the Evolutionary History of a Tumor
Amber Dance | Apr 1, 2017
Analyzing single cell sequences to decipher the evolution of a tumor