Sea Snake “Attacks” Are Cases of Mistaken Identity: Study
Sea Snake “Attacks” Are Cases of Mistaken Identity: Study
The Scientist spoke to marine biologist Tim Lynch, who dusted off 25-year-old data from his PhD to figure out why olive sea snakes approach divers so often. He says the animals, especially the males, likely confuse people for potential mates.
Sea Snake “Attacks” Are Cases of Mistaken Identity: Study
Sea Snake “Attacks” Are Cases of Mistaken Identity: Study

The Scientist spoke to marine biologist Tim Lynch, who dusted off 25-year-old data from his PhD to figure out why olive sea snakes approach divers so often. He says the animals, especially the males, likely confuse people for potential mates.

The Scientist spoke to marine biologist Tim Lynch, who dusted off 25-year-old data from his PhD to figure out why olive sea snakes approach divers so often. He says the animals, especially the males, likely confuse people for potential mates.

venom
How a Centipede Survives its Own Species’ Venom
How a Centipede Survives its Own Species’ Venom
Shawna Williams | Nov 1, 2020
The same toxin targets different receptors in prey and conspecifics to deliver either a lethal or non-lethal blow.
CAR T Cell Adds Scorpion Venom to Tackle Tumor Heterogeneity
CAR T Cell Adds Scorpion Venom to Tackle Tumor Heterogeneity
Amy Schleunes | Mar 24, 2020
A newly engineered CAR T cell that incorporates a peptide isolated from the venom of the deathstalker scorpion has broad brain tumor–binding capabilities that will be investigated in an upcoming clinical trial.
Image of the Day: Scorpion Venom for Arthritis
Image of the Day: Scorpion Venom for Arthritis
Amy Schleunes | Mar 17, 2020
A mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis reveals that a tiny protein in scorpion venom can deliver steroids to affected joints.
Caught on Camera
Caught on Camera
The Scientist Staff | Jan 1, 2018
Selected Images of the Day from the-scientist.com
Animal Analgesics
Animal Analgesics
The Scientist Staff | Jan 1, 2018
A cornucopia of toxins in the animal kingdom could provide inspiration for novel painkillers, but so far, effective drugs have proven elusive.
 
Novel Analgesics at a Snail’s Pace
Novel Analgesics at a Snail’s Pace
Bob Grant | Jan 1, 2018
Studying cone snail venom has yielded novel pain pathways, but the peptides that function as toxins are difficult to translate into drugs.
Researchers Mine Centipede Toxins for Analgesics
Researchers Mine Centipede Toxins for Analgesics
Catherine Offord | Jan 1, 2018
Venomous centipedes may harbor a clue to the creation of a successful pain-killing compound for humans.
Mining Spider Toxins for Analgesic Clues
Mining Spider Toxins for Analgesic Clues
Catherine Offord | Jan 1, 2018
Arachnids harbor a plentiful array of molecules that target mammalian pain receptors.
Sourcing Painkillers from Scorpions’ Stings
Sourcing Painkillers from Scorpions’ Stings
Abby Olena | Jan 1, 2018
Compounds in the arachnids’ venom interact with ion channels to both cause and block pain.
Sea Anemone Toxin Could Treat Autoimmunity
Sea Anemone Toxin Could Treat Autoimmunity
Jef Akst | Jan 1, 2018
If successful, the treatments could alleviate patients’ pain by reducing inflammation.
Frog Skin Yields Potent Painkillers, but None Clinic Ready
Frog Skin Yields Potent Painkillers, but None Clinic Ready
Shawna Williams | Jan 1, 2018
Decades after their discovery by bioprospectors, amphibian-derived analgesics continue to attract scientific attention.
Snake Venoms Cause and Block Pain
Snake Venoms Cause and Block Pain
Kerry Grens | Jan 1, 2018
Painful snake bites may hold clues to developing analgesic drugs.
Prospecting for Painkillers
Prospecting for Painkillers
The Scientist Staff | Dec 31, 2017
Cone snail venom researcher Mandë Holford discusses the therapeutic potential of toxins found in animals.
Image of the Day: Overkill
Image of the Day: Overkill
The Scientist Staff, The Scientist Staff | Oct 6, 2017
The Sakishima habu (pitviper; Protobothrops elegans) can compensate for inept traits in the chemical composition of its venom by overdosing its prey.
Image of the Day: Fanged Fish
Image of the Day: Fanged Fish
The Scientist Staff | Apr 13, 2017
Poisonous fang blennies (Meiacanthus) are only around 2 inches long but, with their tiny fangs, they can inject predators with a venom that has potent hypotensive effects.
Anti-Inflammatory Drugs as Antivenom?
Anti-Inflammatory Drugs as Antivenom?
Bob Grant | Feb 24, 2016
Compounds typically used to calm the immune system can prevent death from scorpion venom in mice, researchers report.
Spider and Centipede Venom Remarkably Similar
Spider and Centipede Venom Remarkably Similar
Bob Grant | Jun 12, 2015
The predatory toxins employed by animals separated by millions of years of evolution are virtually identical, a study shows.
Along Came a Spider
Along Came a Spider
Jef Akst | Dec 1, 2014
Researchers are turning to venom peptides to protect crops from their most devastating pests.
Snakebites Get DNA Fingerprint Treatment
Snakebites Get DNA Fingerprint Treatment
Bob Grant | Nov 4, 2014
Researchers have developed a technique for determining the species of snake responsible for a bite by sequencing genetic material from the fang marks.