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Companies Create New Antisense Drugs As Clinical Trials Progress
Companies Create New Antisense Drugs As Clinical Trials Progress
Sidebar: Further Information - Companies Creating Antisense Drugs BROADENED FOCUS: Shaji George says an equal number of biologists and chemists make up Innovir Laboratories' research team. Embracing the idea that tomorrow's drugs will not merely treat symptoms, but also attack disease-causing genes, scores of biotechnology companies are developing compounds to intervene in the cell's genetic machinery. One focus of this activity is antisense therapeutics: the use of synthetic nucleic acids de
Implementation Of NRC Science Standards Moves Ahead, Despite Setbacks For Some
Implementation Of NRC Science Standards Moves Ahead, Despite Setbacks For Some
A prominent national science education reform program received a major blow when the National Science Foundation opted to discontinue its support. Sidebar: For Further Information - NAS Science Education Standards 'DISASTER': Without a funding renewal, Bill Aldridge worries about the fate of students and teachers in his project. Educators are devising ways of implementing the National Research Council's (NRC's) National science education standards, which were finalized and released a year ag
Researchers Disagree On NIH Plan To Improve Its Peer-Review Process
Researchers Disagree On NIH Plan To Improve Its Peer-Review Process
Sidebar: The RGA's Committee's Recommendation CREATIVE BOOST: An alternative proposal from UCSF’s Keith Yamamoto adds innovation into the peer-review equation. As officials at the National Institutes of Health consider a proposal to change the peer-review process by which grant applications are considered, researchers offer divided opinions on whether the plan would help or hinder science. A highly disputed issue -- whether the changes would foster creative, innovative science -- has le
As War On Cancer Hits 25-Year Mark, Scientists See Progress, Challenges
As War On Cancer Hits 25-Year Mark, Scientists See Progress, Challenges
It's 25 years and counting since President Richard Nixon signed the National Cancer Act on Dec. 23, 1971, marking the United States' official declaration of war on cancer. The act provided funding to establish medical centers dedicated to clinical research and cancer treatment under the auspices of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Yet, after an estimated $28 billion spent to find cures and better treatments for the dreaded disease, the war is far from over. Most scientists note the tremend
The RGA Committee's Recommendations
The RGA Committee's Recommendations
The following recommendations of the National Institutes of Health's Rating of Grant Applications (RGA) committee are taken from NIH's World Wide Web page (www.nih.gov), where the committee's entire report is available. Comments may be sent to dder@nih.gov. The three proposed criteria listed below should be adopted for unsolicited research project grant applications. Significance: The extent to which the project, if successfully carried out, will make an original and important contribution to
For Further Information
For Further Information
Aronex Pharmaceuticals Inc.: http://www.aronex.com Genta Inc.: http://www.biospace.com/g/synd/__1bea46f6/exhib_script/exhibitors/GentaInc.html Gilead Sciences Inc.: http://www.biospace.com/g/synd/__fe1bc27a/exhib_script/exhibitors/GileadSciences.html Hybridon Inc.: http://www.hybridon.com Innovir Laboratories Inc.: http://www.biospace.com/g/synd/__abaabeee/exhib_script/exhibitors/InnovirLaboratoriesInc.html Isis Pharmaceuticals Inc: http://www.sddt.com/files/library/1corporateprofiles/corp
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION - National Academy of Sciences Science Education Standards
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION - National Academy of Sciences Science Education Standards
Science Education Standards National Academy of Sciences Science Education Standards: http://www.nap.edu/readingroom/books/nses National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) main Web site: http://www.nsta.org NSTA's Scope, Sequence, and Coordination Web site: http://www.gsh.org/NSTA_SSandC American Association for the Advancement of Science's Project 2061: http://www.aaas.org National Center for Educational Statistics Third International Mathematics and Science Survey (TIMSS): http://www.ed
The Scientist - Crossword Puzzle - December 9, 1996
The Scientist - Crossword Puzzle - December 9, 1996
By Eric Albert Email: ealbert@world.std.com ACROSS 1 RNA Splitter 9 Fluid-filled sac near a joint 10 Incus location 11 Freckle-like skin spot 13 Catalyst involved in energy release 15 It stimulates the production of glucocorticoids: abbr 17 Reference work 18 Progesterone-secreting gland 20 Immunoglobulin producer 21O e.g. 22 Classification categories 25 Develop to a diferent adaptive state 26 Return of a disease 29 UAG, for one 31 Hairlike processes on the small intestine 32 Genetic damage rev
The Scientist - Crossword Puzzle Answers- December 9, 1996
The Scientist - Crossword Puzzle Answers- December 9, 1996
By Eric Albert Email: ealbert@world.std.com ACROSS 1 RNA Splitter 9 Fluid-filled sac near a joint 10 Incus location 11 Freckle-like skin spot 13 Catalyst involved in energy release 15 It stimulates the production of glucocorticoids: abbr 17 Reference work 18 Progesterone-secreting gland 20 Immunoglobulin producer 21O e.g. 22 Classification categories 25 Develop to a diferent adaptive state 26 Return of a disease 29 UAG, for one 31 Hairlike processes on the small intestine 32 Genetic damage rev

Leaders of Science

Peter Raven
Peter Raven
The Scientist Date: December 9, 1996 THE SCIENTIST® The Newspaper for the Life Sciences Professional (609)-786-7207 For Fast Service "While I read a lot of news and scientific journals, THE SCIENTIST gives me a comprehensive overview and keeps me up to date on science policy, news, and issues. This is very important to me because of the various committees on which I serve." PETER RAVEN Director, Missouri Botanical Garden and Professor, Washington University, St. Louis Home Secretary,

Clarification

Clarification
Clarification
The article "Academic Job Security Threatened As Anti-Tenure Wave Sweeps U.S." (R. Finn, The Scientist, Nov. 11, 1996, page 1) reported incorrect information concerning tenure at Dartmouth Medical School. The school stopped awarding tenure in 1979, except for deans, department chairpersons, and endowed professorships. Those already tenured retained their status. The school reinstated tenure in 1993 for full professors employed by Dartmouth College.

Opinion

The Remaining Smallpox Virus Stocks Are Too Valuable To Be Destroyed
The Remaining Smallpox Virus Stocks Are Too Valuable To Be Destroyed
Smallpox, or variola, virus has killed more human beings than any other infectious agent. Fortunately, smallpox virus has only one host-humans -- which made it possible to eradicate it. In 1967, the World Health Organization (WHO) initiated a brilliant campaign that, within 10 years, eradicated smallpox virus from human populations, the last case occurring in Somalia in 1977. Illustration: John Overmeyer Soon after, the question arose as to what to do with the smallpox isolates stored in lab

Commentary

The Prostaglandin-Prostacyclin-Nitric Oxide Connection
The Prostaglandin-Prostacyclin-Nitric Oxide Connection
Sidebar: Highly Cited Nitric Oxide ARticles by Salvador Moncada As part of my keynote address at the 10th International Conference on Prostaglandins and Related Compounds in Vienna on September 22, I reviewed my 1984 analysis of the 1982 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine that honored the work of Sir John R. Vane, Sune K. Bergstrom, and Bengt I. Samuelsson in advancing prostaglandin research (E. Garfield, Current Contents, 12:3-12, March 19, 1984). This field has grown enormously since then

Letter

Small Departments
Small Departments
After 25 years teaching and directing undergraduate research in a small physics department at a state "commuter" university, I agree with Kathryn S. Brown ("The Key To Academic Bliss Can Be Found In Large Or Small Departments," The Scientist, Oct. 28, 1996, page 15) that this can be a rewarding career. However, given today's emphasis on cost-driven management and the shift to part-time students with heavy job responsibilities, I suggest the candidate seek accurate answers to the following quest
Highly Cited Nitric Oxide Articles By Salvador Moncada
Highly Cited Nitric Oxide Articles By Salvador Moncada
1981-95 CitationsJan.-Sept. 1996 CitationsAt Least 250 Citations, 1981-95 3,879 431 R.M.J. Palmer, A.G. Ferrige, S. Moncada, "Nitric-oxide release accounts for the biological activity of endothelium-derived relaxing factor," Nature, 327:524-6, 1987. 3,347 775 S. Moncada, R.M.J. Palmer, E.A. Higgs, "Nitric oxide-physiology, pathophysiology and pharmacology," Pharmacological Reviews, 43:109-42, 1992. 1,815 199 R.M.J. Palmer, D.S. Ashton, S. Moncada,"Vascular endothelial cells synthesize nit
Fellowship of Scientists
Fellowship of Scientists
The Scientist has often raised issues concerning science and religion, and many of its readers respond to those articles. An aspect of these concerns is that scientists with religious convictions have an obligation to integrate their lives of faith and of science. One Christian approach to this has been taken by the Fellowship of Scientists, a nondenominational group of scientists working together to explore the practice of science as a vocation. This perspective may be of interest both to Chr
Big-Money Prizes
Big-Money Prizes
I would like to add a comment on the essay by Harriet Zuckerman on scientific prizes [Opinion, The Scientist, Nov. 11, 1996, page 10]. She mentions the moneys, some very substantial, that accompany the prizes. To me these monetary awards are a disgrace. They skew the meanings of the accomplishments, have nothing to do with the science, distort the public view of the science, and send a wrong impression to younger scientists. I would suggest to the Nobel Prize committee that in the future they d
Senior Scientists
Senior Scientists
I've enjoyed and agree with Murray Saffran's excellent commentary in The Scientist ["Senior Scientists' Experience Can Offer A Valuable Resource To Today's Students," Sept. 30, 1996, page 11]. I'm the vice president of quality and compliance in a small biotechnology company, where most of my colleagues are in their 20s and 30s. Nearing my 60th birthday, I encounter several advantages to my seniority every day. There are, for example, frequent opportunities to mentor the growth and development o

Research

Cancer Resources
Cancer Resources
American Association for Cancer Research Public Ledger Building, Suite 816 150 S. Independence Mall West Philadelphia, Pa. 19106-3483 (215) 440-9300, Fax: (215) 440-9913 E-mail: aacr@aacr.org World Wide Web: http://www.aacr.org 12,500 members President: Louise C. Strong Executive Director: Margaret Foti Journals: Cancer Research, Cell Growth & Differentiation, Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, and Clinical Cancer Research American Society of Clinical Oncology 225 Reinekers L
Molecular Advances Offer New Tools, New Hope For Cancer Studies
Molecular Advances Offer New Tools, New Hope For Cancer Studies
Sidebar: Cancer Resources The field of cancer research has been dramatically altered by advances in molecular biology. In some cases, investigators can tease out the precise molecular route by which cells turn cancerous and how those calls are affected by treatments. Researchers are working to understand the nuances of oncogenes, or cancer-causing genes. Others have located cancer susceptibility genes, providing hope for future screening methods and potential treatments. As scientists continue

Hot Paper

Molecular Genetics
Molecular Genetics
Edited by: Steven Benowitz ALLELIC TWINS: Jackson-Weiss and Crouzon syndromes are both caused by FGFR2 mutation, notes Johns Hopkins researcher Ethylin Jabs. E.W. Jabs, X. Li, A.F. Scott, G. Meyers, W. Chen, M. Eccles, J.I. Mao, L.R. Charnas, C.E. Jackson, M. Jaye, "Jackson-Weiss and Crouzon syndromes are allelic with mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 2," Nature Genetics, 8:275-9, 1994. (Cited in nearly 70 publications through October 1996) Comments by Ethylin Wang Jabs, Johns H
Cell Biochemistry
Cell Biochemistry
Edited by: Steven Benowitz REGULATED ACTIVITY: Vanderbilt’s John Exton describes the enzyme phospholipase D’s involvement in the signaling pathway of RhoA. K.C. Malcolm, A.H. Ross, R-G. Qui, M. Symons, J.H. Exton, "Activation of rat liver phospholipase D by the small GTP-binding protein RhoA," Journal of Biological Chemistry, 269:25951-4, 1994. (Cited in nearly 80 publications through October 1996) Comments by John H. Exton, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Vanderbilt University S

Profession

The Key To A Happy, Productive Lab: Let Scientists Lead Themselves
The Key To A Happy, Productive Lab: Let Scientists Lead Themselves
Most scientists have either witnessed or worked in an unhappy lab where demoralized students and employees dread coming to work in the morning, spend the day grousing and gossiping, and hurry home by 5:00 p.m. Creating a pleasant, productive environment is a challenge that eludes some of the brightest scientists. Authorities in laboratory management note that fostering a happy lab depends on choosing the right people, knitting together a cohesive group, and exercising an appropriate level of su

Technology

Easy-To-Use Tools Are On Cell Culture Researchers' Holiday Wish List
Easy-To-Use Tools Are On Cell Culture Researchers' Holiday Wish List
Sidebar: Selected Suppliers Of Tools For Cell Culture BIOREACTOR: Bellco Glass offers the E/Z Access Reactor for culturing mammalian, plant, and insect cells. Early in this century, 1912 Nobel Prize winner Alexis Carrel of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research was a leader in cell and tissue culture. Among his accomplishments, Carrel showed how to transfer and study colonies of animal cells. At the time, some cell culture researchers were exceedingly formal. In Carrel's lab, assistan
Selected Suppliers of Tools For Cell Culture
Selected Suppliers of Tools For Cell Culture
Applikon Inc. Bellco Glass Inc. Biomedical Technologies Inc. BioSource International Inc. Boehringer Mannheim Inc. Cole-Parmer Instrument Co Fisher Scientific Inc. Intergen Co. Life Technologies Inc. Mediatech Inc. PGC Scientifics Corp. Promega Corp Synthecon Inc. VWR Scientific Products Wako BioProducts Carl Zeiss Inc.

New Products

New Products
New Products
Column Thermostat For HPLC The Mistral HPLC (high-performance liquid chromatography) column thermostat uses forced heat air exchange to control temperatures with a claimed accuracy of better than ±0.1°C. It fits with any HPLC system and offers flexible positioning of inlet and outlet tubing. The thermostat accommodates multiple columns and allows the injection valve to be placed inside the thermostat. It is available in two primary models: as a column heater with a temperature range

Notebook

Notebook
Notebook
NEW CHAIR IN TOWN: F. James Sensenbrenner Republicans retained control of the House and Senate in last month's elections, but there will be a few newcomers on science-related committees when the 105th Congress convenes early next month.The retirement of Rep. Robert S. Walker (R-Pa.) leaves Rep. F. James Sensenbrenner (R-Wis.) as his successor as chairman of the House Science Committee. Rep. George E. Brown, Jr. (D-Calif.) will remain its ranking minority member. Committee members Bill Baker (R
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