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Editorial: Some Real Action After Decades of Talk About Diversity
Editorial: Some Real Action After Decades of Talk About Diversity
Anne Harding - Guest Editor Some Real Action After Decades of Talk About Diversity In 1989, the number of PhDs in science and engineering awarded to blacks in the United States was 222, just 1.8% of the total - and a drop from 288 in 1977. More recently the numbers are better. According to the National Science Foundation, 661 blacks received a PhD in science or engineering in 2003
Diversity: Some Myths, and the Realities
Diversity: Some Myths, and the Realities
Myth: Diversity is good for business. Reality: It's a bit more complicated than that. Research from MIT's Thomas Kochan showed-controversially-that ethnic and gender diversity can harm team and company performance if they're not managed effectively. (see "Diversity: The New Business Case") Myth: Blacks and Latinos don't consider careers in researc
The Government's Assessment
The Government's Assessment
The Government's Assessment In the current mixed legal climate, where diversity programs have been ruled constitutional and litigation continues over their appropriate boundaries, federal agencies are by and large continuing to fund programs aimed at increasing participation in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) by underrepresented minorit
The Government's Assessment
The Government's Assessment
The Government's Assessment In the current mixed legal climate, where diversity programs have been ruled constitutional and litigation continues over their appropriate boundaries, federal agencies are by and large continuing to fund programs aimed at increasing participation in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) by underrepresented minorit
Show Me the Money
Show Me the Money
1 Nothing much had changed by 2004, when another study of faculty in academic medicine showed that even when controlling for total publications, years of seniority, and hours worked per week, female faculty members were paid on average $12,000 less than their male peers. 2 The gender wage gap is frequently attributed to women taking time off to have children or working fewer hours a week to take care of their families. There may be s
Old Problem, Old Solutions
Old Problem, Old Solutions
By Kirsten Weir Old Problem, Old Solutions Failure to question conventional wisdom contributes to persistent leaks in scientific pipeline. © Getty Images/Jan Stromme Monique Ferguson nearly slipped through the cracks. Though she was a top student in high school and college, she faced a bumpy road as an African-American woman pursuing a science career in what she felt was "a good-old-boys
Back to Nature
Back to Nature
By Anthony H. Williams and Carole Williams-Green Environmental education center gets city kids started down the path to science. Just a stone's throw from streets sprinkled with shattered glass, in a largely African-American west Philadelphia neighborhood, exists a convergence of labs, volunteers, educators, and most importantly, eager students. We established the Cobbs Creek Environment
Small World
Small World
By Ed Silverman Small World Globalization means broader definition of diversity, and broader opportunities. Weiyi Zheng says he loves his career in the New Jersey suburbs, but he wouldn't turn down an opportunity to return to his native China. And thanks to the increasing globalization of the pharma industry workforce, his employer just might give him the ch
The Feminine Touch
The Feminine Touch
By Karen Pallarito The Feminine Touch Women are joining forces to invest in life science ventures, and getting results. "We feel there's a huge opportunity to be able to support the initiatives that these women are going to want to take in terms of entrepreneurship and growing businesses." — Donna
What We Can Learn from the Elite Controllers
What We Can Learn from the Elite Controllers
What We Can Learn from the ELITE CONTROLLERS Infected nonprogressors are providing clues to the control, and potentially the eradication, of HIV By Gail Dutton FEATURE ARTICLES 25 Years with HIV ARTICLE EXTRAS Jeff Getty: Lessons in desperate measuresHow a risky experiment led to a new understanding of HIV HIV Shows ItselfA 1981 report in the MMWR marks the beginning The Impact of HIVIts progressions, 1981-2006 and beyond Why Monkeys Block HIVOld world monkeys don't
PROFILES
PROFILES
Profiles In this section we showcase ten exceptional life scientists from underrepresented groups in academia and industry who recount their lives and career paths. Their accomplishments, as unique as their histories, demonstrate first-hand how diversity enriches not only a specific discipline or field, but all of society. There is a sense of excitem
Benjamin Cuker
Benjamin Cuker
By E.J. Mundell Benjamin Cuker Professor, Marine and Environmental Science, Hampton University COURTESY OF BENJAMIN CUKER Benjamin Cuker was one of six white kids in his graduating class at Detroit's Mumford High. "And Mumford was putting more kids into colleg
Jeff Getty: Lessons in desperate measures
Jeff Getty: Lessons in desperate measures
Jeff Getty in 1996 Jeff Getty: Lessons in desperate measures By Gail Dutton FEATURE ARTICLES The Elite Controllers of HIVGAIL DUTTON reports from San Francisco on how infected nonprogressors - also known as elite controllers - are providing clues to the control, and potentially the eradication, of HIV. 25 Years with HIV ARTICLE EXTRAS HIV Shows ItselfA 1981 report in the MMWR marks the beginning The Impact of HIVIts progressions, 1981-2006 and beyond Why Monkeys
Juan Rivera
Juan Rivera
By Amy Norton Juan Rivera Chief, Molecular Inflammation Section, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disease, NIH COURTESY OF NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ARTHRITIS AND MUSCULOSKELETAL AND SKIN DISEASES As a young teen in New York City, Juan Rivera was thinking
Erich Jarvis
Erich Jarvis
By Kirsten Weir Erich Jarvis Associate Professor of Neurobiology, Duke University © LES TODD As the stage lights went down on his graduation dance performance at New York's High School of the Performing Arts, Erich Jarvis decided on his future. He'd been
Donna J. Nelson
Donna J. Nelson
By Damaris Christensen Donna J. Nelson Associate Professor of Chemistry, University of Oklahoma COURTESY OF UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA, DEPT OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY Perhaps it was her training as a chemist that led Donna Nelson to insist on filling out eve
A Revolutionary Approach to Biomarker Discovery
A Revolutionary Approach to Biomarker Discovery
A Revolutionary Approach to Biomarker Discovery Immunoassays coupled with mass spectrometrycould reveal new dimensions in the blood  By Emanuel F. Petricoin and Lance A. Liotta ARTICLE EXTRAS Proteomics: Promise and ProblemsSuch early disease detection doesn't always mean longer life, write JENNIFER MILLER and BARNETT KRAMER. INFOGRAPHIC: The Peptidome Hypothesis:What does a disease signature look like in the blood? Serum Proteomics ScrutinizedSELDI-TOF st
Maria Thelma Ocampo, 29
Maria Thelma Ocampo, 29
By Juhi Yajnik Maria Thelma Ocampo, 29 Postdoc, London Research Institute COURTESY OF MARIA OCAMPO HOMETOWN: Manila, Philippines, until she was 8 years old, then Arleta, Calif. WORK/RESEARCH: Ocampo works on DNA packaging and the cohesion complex that holds sis
Andrea Stith, 33
Andrea Stith, 33
By Juhi Yajnik Andrea Stith, 33 Program Officer for educational grant programs, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) COURTESY OF COLELLA PHOTOGRAPHY EDUCATION: PhD in biophysics, University of Virginia HOMETOWN: West Point, NY WORK/RESEARC
Toolkit
Toolkit
Do you have the right tools to create or reinvigorate a diversity initiative that's effective? Who is (or should be) responsible for its success and how do you measure that success? This section offers proven approaches to meeting these common challenges - in both business and academic settings - shared by those who've already experienced success. There's also a new business case for diversity that s
Shared Challenges, Shared Solutions
Shared Challenges, Shared Solutions
1 Another stereotype claims that inadequate K-12 education in the United States is to blame for students' lack of interest in pursuing college-level science study. Data from our own and other institutions indicate that students of color and from all educational and income levels enroll in introductory courses in biology and chemistry (the disciplines on which we have focused) at representative levels. Yet they disengage during their earliest experi
Hitting the Ground Running
Hitting the Ground Running
By E.J. Mundell Hitting the Ground Running Summer 'boot camp' and early lab experience give Meyerhoff scholars a head start on the road to research. The Meyerhoffs (bottom right) with UMBC President and Mrs. Hrabowski, III, and Meyerhoff graduates. COURTESY OF JIM BURGER
Confronting Risk
Confronting Risk
Challenges to your business - both daily and long-term competitiveness - lurk in surprising places. Here's how to protect your company. By Bruce Belzak ARTICLE EXTRAS Case study:A medical device component manufacturer faces nervous senior executives Case study:What happens when a fire strikes your production facility? Four ways to save money – and your business Five Things Not to Forget When ForecastingForecast models can become complex, but the principles for gathering
Case Study: Product Risk Assessment
Case Study: Product Risk Assessment
PRODUCT RISK ASSESSMENT By Donald Esker and Robert Gauss FEATURE ARTICLE Confronting RiskChallenges to your business - both daily and long-term competitiveness - lurk in surprising places. BRUCE BELZAK explains how to protect your company. ARTICLE EXTRAS Case study:What happens when a fire strikes your production facility? Four ways to save money - and your business Five Things Not to Forget When ForecastingForecast models can become complex, but the principles for gatherin
Diversity: The New Business Case
Diversity: The New Business Case
By Anne Harding Diversity: The New Business Case Helping different departments collaborate is part of diversity's new meaning. For Paul Graves of Schering-Plough, managing diversity is about much more than hiring minorities — although that's certainly part of it. It's really about helping people from very
Case Study: Business Continuity Planning
Case Study: Business Continuity Planning
CASE STUDY: BUSINESS CONTINUITY PLANNING By Fred Klapetzky FEATURE ARTICLE Confronting RiskChallenges to your business - both daily and long-term competitiveness - lurk in surprising places. BRUCE BELZAK explains how to protect your company. ARTICLE EXTRAS Case study:A medical device component manufacturer faces nervous senior executives Four ways to save money - and your business Five Things Not to Forget When ForecastingForecast models can become complex, but the princi
Four Ways to Save Money and Your Business
Four Ways to Save Money and Your Business
Four Ways to Save Money - and Your Business An underwriter reveals the must-do items he looks for when evaluating a company for coverage. By Philip W. Fiscus FEATURE ARTICLE Confronting RiskChallenges to your business – both daily and long-term competitiveness – lurk in surprising places. BRUCE BELZAK explains how to protect your company. ARTICLE EXTRAS Case study:A medical device component manufacturer faces nervous senior executives Case s
Getting Results
Getting Results
By Charles Q. Choi Getting Results You've started a diversity program. But how do you know if it's having any effect? Harvard Medical School has offered a voluntary diversity-training program every year since 2000. Immediately after each session, organizers asked how much volunteers liked learning about the importance of diversity for organizations. People
Diversity Supplement 2007: Cobbs Creek Slideshow
Diversity Supplement 2007: Cobbs Creek Slideshow
var FO = { movie:"http://images.the-scientist.com/supplements/20061101/xmlSlideshow.swf", width:"577", height:"600", majorversion:"8", build:"0", xi:"true"}; UFO.create(FO, "ufoDemo"); Cobbs Creek Slideshow Please download the Adobe Flash Player to view this content: To learn more about the center, visit CobbsCreek.org

Contributors

Contributors
Contributors
Lance Liotta (top) and Emanuel Petricoin (bottom) made a splash in 2002 when they used mass spec techniques coupled with pattern matching software to identify proteomic signatures indicative of ovarian cancer. Now co-directors of the Center for Applied Proteomics and Molecular Medicine at George Mason University, they continue searching for diagnostic signals in blood serum, which they write about on page 32. "In some ways we're even more optimistic as to the potential and

Editorial

End this Stem Cell Racket
End this Stem Cell Racket
Once the Bush Administration policy is fixed, there's another problem that's at least as large.

Mail

Letters
Letters
Are we training too many scientists? It's not that we're training too many scientists,1,2 but that we are not training too many scientists well. My institution receives hundreds of applications for faculty position openings, but most of them do not even make the first cut. I believe that this is because many principal investigators (PIs) are irresponsibly allowing people to earn PhDs without really deserving them. In the lab where I got my PhD, of every four students who started a

Notebook

Scientists under the microscope
Scientists under the microscope
SPARRING PARTNERS: Jo Handelsman and Daniel Lee Kleinman Credit: © MARTHA BUSSE" />SPARRING PARTNERS: Jo Handelsman and Daniel Lee Kleinman Credit: © MARTHA BUSSE Daniel Lee Kleinman and Jo Handelsman first sparred in 1995, when the University of Wisconsin, Madison sociologist spent six months as a guest in Handelsman's plant pathology lab. The sociologist's goal was to find out how financial incentives - say, profits from selling microorganisms as therapeutics - might shape the
The cancer-fighting teen
The cancer-fighting teen
Shivani Sud (right) with Jan Davidson of the Davidson Institute. Credit: http://www.LEPOLDPHOTOGRAPHY.COM LEPOLDPHOTOGRAPHY.COM _blank" />Shivani Sud (right) with Jan Davidson of the Davidson Institute. Credit: http://www.LEPOLDPHOTOGRAPHY.COM LEPOLDPHOTOGRAPHY.COM _blank When Shivani Sud was six years old, a member of her immediate family had surgery to remove a brain tumor. Desperate to help, Sud dragged a stepstool to the kitchen sink, sprinkled soap on a sponge and began w
Snyder, sludge fighter
Snyder, sludge fighter
Caroline Snyder Credit: COURTESY OF CAROLINE SNYDER" />Caroline Snyder Credit: COURTESY OF CAROLINE SNYDER It was sometime in the late 1990s that Caroline Snyder first read news reports about a couple in Greenland, NH, who were blaming recycled sewage sludge - also known as biosolids - for the death of their son. Although she was an environmental scientist, Snyder didn't really know anything about sludge, but the story piqued her interest because she had recently retired to New Hampshi

The Agenda

The Agenda
The Agenda
ELITE HIV RESEARCHERS » On November 17, the Institute of Human Virology, which is celebrating its 10th anniversary this year, will hold its 2006 International HIV/AIDS meeting in Baltimore. No doubt, elite controllers of HIV - the subject of a feature on page 26 - will come up at least a few times at the conference, which features many of the top researchers in AIDS. For more, see www.ihv.org/meeting/index.html. BIOMARKERS IN VIENNA » If Emanuel Petricoin and Lance Li

Column

Working With Stem Cells? Pay Up
Working With Stem Cells? Pay Up
What the Wisconsin patent stranglehold means for researchers.
Saving Bison, Losing Tigers
Saving Bison, Losing Tigers
Wildlife conservation approaches to anthrax and poaching have divergent results.

Profile

The Fast Track to Success
The Fast Track to Success
Laura Landweber was 33 when she received tenure at Princeton. Oxytricha, beware: She's got a lot of science ahead of her.

Books etc.

On the Trail of a Point Mutation
On the Trail of a Point Mutation
The discovery of a blood-cancer gene raises tantalizing questions

Hot Paper

SNPs for diabetes
SNPs for diabetes
The paper: K. Silander et al., "Genetic variation near the hepatocyte nuclear factor-4á gene predicts susceptibility to type 2 diabetes," Diabetes, 53:1141-9, 2004. (Cited in 68 papers) The finding: A team of Finnish and US researchers, led by University of Michigan professor Michael Boehnke, found that several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) around the transcription factor, hepatocyte nuclear factor-4á (HNF4A), were associated with dia
Why hormone therapy fails
Why hormone therapy fails
Finasteride, an antiandrogen Credit: © 2003 DIVISION OF CHEMICAL EDUCATION, AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY" />Finasteride, an antiandrogen Credit: © 2003 DIVISION OF CHEMICAL EDUCATION, AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY The paper: C. Chen et al., "Molecular determinants of resistance to antiandrogen therapy," Nat Med, 10:33-9, 2004. (Cited in 176 papers) The finding: Using gene-expression profiling, Charles Sawyers then at the University of California, Los Angel
Tetramer model trashed
Tetramer model trashed
Two models of histone incorporation Credit: © 2004 ELSEVIER" />Two models of histone incorporation Credit: © 2004 ELSEVIER The paper: H. Tagami et al., "Histone H3.1 and H3.3 complexes mediate nucleosome assembly pathways dependent or independent of DNA synthesis," Cell, 116:51-61, 2004. (Cited in 146 papers) The finding: Yoshihiro Nakatani's group at Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Geneviève Almouzni's group at Curie Institute in France identi

Papers To Watch

How to predict epistatic gene interactions
How to predict epistatic gene interactions
When combined, the effects of mutations in different genes often deviate from what would be expected by looking at them separately. Researchers at the University of València in Spain have shown that an organism's genomic complexity may predict these epistatic gene interactions.1 It is a "fascinating new synthesis of published experiments," writes Faculty of 1000 member Richard Lenski of Michigan State University, adding that it is "sure to stimulate empirical and theoretical research fo
New technique IDs odor-related neurons
New technique IDs odor-related neurons
Credit: COURTESY OF ANDRE FIALA AND THOMAS RIEMENSPERGER" /> Credit: COURTESY OF ANDRE FIALA AND THOMAS RIEMENSPERGER Using light to activate specific brain cells that release chemicals implicated in positive or negative experiences, Andrâ Fiala and colleagues at the University of Würzburg identified neurons that are responsible for assigning value to a neutral odor in the Drosophila.1 "It is a very elegant study revealing both impressive technical and scientific findings," says Facu
Papers to Watch
Papers to Watch
R.J. Dawson and K.P. Locher, "Structure of a bacterial multidrug ABC transporter," Nature , 443:180-5, Sept. 14, 2006. "This paper reports the first high resolution crystal structure of an ABC transporter carrying out multidrug efflux. This structure from the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus may be useful to interpret the mechanism of cystic fibrosis and other human diseases." Andrè GoffeauCatholic University of Louvain, Belgium

Scientist To Watch

Sohyun Ahn: Thinking Things Through
Sohyun Ahn: Thinking Things Through
Credit: JASON VARNEY | http://www.VARNEYPHOTO.COMVARNEYPHOTO.COM_blank" /> Credit: JASON VARNEY | http://www.VARNEYPHOTO.COMVARNEYPHOTO.COM_blank Commenting on the immaculate desk of Sohyun Ahn elicits an embarrassed giggle, but practically any other question gets a thoughtful look from behind her blue cat's-eye glasses. Throughout her career, Ahn has made a habit of stepping back and studying the situation before acting. "It's important to take a break and think about thing

Lab Tools

Pulse Oximeter

Making Better Leaders Out of Alpha Males and Females
Making Better Leaders Out of Alpha Males and Females
Credit: © JAMES PAULS" /> Credit: © JAMES PAULS Ellen McMahon was a rising star as leader of the cardiovascular research group at Pharmacia before its merger with Pfizer. But she started to get grumbling from her team, and talks about management style from her bosses. McMahon says her staff "was struggling with my leadership, they didn?t feel involved in making decisions. I was more in the mode of driving towards goals rather than considering team dynamics." McMahon, an acknowledg

Foundations

The Discovery of Estrogen Receptor β
The Discovery of Estrogen Receptor β
In situ hybridization showing ERβ expression in prostatic epithelium (near left) and ovarian granulosa cells (far left). Below is a notebook page describing the phenotypes of ERβ knockout mice. Credit: IN SITU IMAGES: © 1996 THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES / NOTEBOOK: COURTESY OF JAN-ǺKE GUSTAFSSON" />In situ hybridization showing ERβ expression in prostatic epithelium (near left) and ovarian granulosa cells (far left). Below is a notebook page describing the phenotyp
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