line illustration of DNA with single-strand break
Cancer Cells Break Own DNA to Defend Against Radiation
Self-inflicted DNA breaks let the cells hit pause on repair of radiation-induced DNA damage, giving them time to recover, an in vitro study shows.
ABOVE: © iStock.com, bubaone
Cancer Cells Break Own DNA to Defend Against Radiation
Cancer Cells Break Own DNA to Defend Against Radiation

Self-inflicted DNA breaks let the cells hit pause on repair of radiation-induced DNA damage, giving them time to recover, an in vitro study shows.

Self-inflicted DNA breaks let the cells hit pause on repair of radiation-induced DNA damage, giving them time to recover, an in vitro study shows.

ABOVE: © iStock.com, bubaone

cancer cell lines

Hela cells colored in blue
Henrietta Lacks Estate Sues Thermo Fisher over HeLa Cell Line
Catherine Offord | Oct 4, 2021
Attorneys for the family seek compensation for the company’s sale of cells cloned from tissue removed without consent by doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital 70 years ago.
A view of the nucleus of a cell with DNA in blue, RNA in pink, and associated proteins in yellow and purple
DNA Methylation Influences Replication and Genome Organization
Abby Olena | Sep 22, 2021
A study links the loss of DNA methylation across the genome—as is common in cancer—to the disruption of the 3-D compartments that organize the genome and to the timing of DNA replication.
Defined Primary Cell Culture and Media
The Scientist Creative Services Team in collaboration with MilliporeSigma | Jul 29, 2021
A new partnership opens the door for a source of highly purified human primary cells and defined cell culture media.
visualization of p53 protein interacting with its inhibitors MDM2 and MDMX
p53 Unleashes Endogenous Retroviruses to Tackle Tumors: Study
Marcus A. Banks | Jul 29, 2021
New experiments suggest the famous tumor-suppressing protein uses viral elements lingering in the genome to get cancerous cells to announce their presence to the immune system.
telomere length sticky stuck chromosome aging apoptosis cancer cell oxidative stress
Image of the Day: Sticky Telomeres
Chia-Yi Hou | May 16, 2019
Telomeres in cancer cells exposed to oxidative stress got shorter and stickier.
Image of the Day: Triple Threat
The Scientist Staff | Sep 17, 2017
Scientists use stem-like cells from patients’ aggressive, triple receptor-negative breast tumors to grow cell lines for research.
Oprah to Star in Henrietta Lacks Movie
Tanya Lewis | May 3, 2016
She will also be an executive producer on the HBO Films project, which is based on a 2010 book about the life of Henrietta Lacks.
The Great Big Clean-Up
Kerry Grens | Sep 1, 2015
From tossing out cross-contaminated cell lines to flagging genomic misnomers, a push is on to tidy up biomedical research.
Seeded by Weeds
K. John Morrow Jr. | May 1, 2015
More than 50 years after cross-contamination of cultured cell lines was recognized, the problem continues to plague the scientific community.
Next Generation: Cancer Cell Protein Profiling
Abby Olena | Jan 15, 2014
Antibody barcoding allows scientists and clinicians to analyze protein expression in small amounts of cancer tissue.
Single-Gene Knockout Collection Created
Kerry Grens | Aug 25, 2013
Researchers develop several thousand haploid human cell lines, each with a different gene mutant.
Cancer Gene Data Released
Chris Palmer | Jul 18, 2013
NCI has made public the largest-ever database of cancer-specific gene variations, paving the way for the development of new drugs and therapies.
Soybean Peptides Slow Some Cancer Cells
Dan Cossins | Mar 25, 2013
Researchers show that peptides isolated from certain types of soybean inhibit the growth of human colon, liver, and lung cancer cells.
 
Creative Emulsification
Sabrina Richards | Nov 1, 2012
Enhancing data collection from emulsion PCR reactions: three case studies
Collecting Cancer Data
Hannah Waters | Mar 29, 2012
Two new cancer cell line databases bursting with genomic and drug profiling data may help researchers identify drug targets.