Dark red cancer cells travel through the circulatory system alongside small, brighter-colored red blood cells
Traversing Narrow Channels Helps Metastatic Cancer Cells Survive
In vitro and mouse experiments show how cancer cells forced through tiny pores—mimicking the physical experience of metastasis—resisted programmed cell death and avoided detection by the immune cells that would normally kill them.
ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, LIBRE DE DROIT
Traversing Narrow Channels Helps Metastatic Cancer Cells Survive
Traversing Narrow Channels Helps Metastatic Cancer Cells Survive

In vitro and mouse experiments show how cancer cells forced through tiny pores—mimicking the physical experience of metastasis—resisted programmed cell death and avoided detection by the immune cells that would normally kill them.

In vitro and mouse experiments show how cancer cells forced through tiny pores—mimicking the physical experience of metastasis—resisted programmed cell death and avoided detection by the immune cells that would normally kill them.

ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, LIBRE DE DROIT

cell migration

Image of an abstract fractal blue and green sea shell.
Cell Chirality Offers Clues to the Mystery of Body Asymmetry
Catherine Offord | Feb 1, 2022
Researchers explore the idea that molecular patterns in individual cells could underlie the development of a left and a right in animals.
Derek Applewhite’s Actin Research Inspires the Next Generation
Lisa Winter | Mar 1, 2021
The biologist’s undergraduate-centered lab allows students to play a meaningful role in research.
Beauty Is More Than Skin Deep: 3D Imaging from Micro to Macro
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Jan 12, 2021
Lai Guan Ng will discuss how whole-skin imaging advances skin immunity research.
arida1 pi3ka gene endometriosis uterine cancer uterus cell migration
Two Genes Conspire in Endometriosis and Cancer to Help Cells Migrate
Emma Yasinski | Aug 9, 2019
The genes promote the migration of endothelial cells outside of the uterus, a characteristic of both endometriosis and endometrial cancers, a study of mice and human tissue finds.
ribosomes epithelial to mesenchymal transition cancer progression cell migration
Image of the Day: More Ribosomes
Chia-Yi Hou | May 10, 2019
An increased production of ribosomes may underlie cell migration and relate to cancer metastasis, according to a new study.
primordial germ cells
Stray Germ Cells May Seed Female-Biased Cancerous Cysts
Ashley Yeager | Apr 1, 2019
Similarities in gene expression hint at the origin of a certain type of pancreatic tumor that predominantly afflicts women.
Image of the Day: Cell Dance 
The Scientist Staff, The Scientist Staff | Nov 24, 2017
Scientists develop a micropatterning device to study cell behavior. 
Researchers Refute Proposed Neuron Migration Pathway
Jef Akst | Jan 10, 2017
A team of scientists was unable to replicate controversial, high-profile findings published in 2011.
Watching Cancer on the Move
Jef Akst | Dec 15, 2015
Fibroblasts help tumors metastasize by paving a “migration highway” through the extracellular matrix, scientists report.
Honeybee Compound for Hair Loss?
Jef Akst | Dec 11, 2014
Propolis, a natural product used by honeybees to repair their hives, stimulates hair growth in shaved mice.
Beach Reading
Mary Beth Aberlin | Jul 1, 2013
A vacation from your lab doesn’t have to mean a break from fascinating developments on the life science front.
Fellow Travelers
Dan Cossins | Feb 1, 2013
Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.
Go Forth, Cells
Dan Cossins | Jan 31, 2013
Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.
Sperm Shadows
Ruth Williams | Jan 1, 2013
Tracking the shadows cast by sperm reveals their precise 3-D movements.
Capturing Crawling Cells
Amber Dance | Dec 5, 2012
The methodology behind an experiment that used the Oris Pro Cell Migration Assay to track the travels of cancer cells.
Hit Parade
Amber Dance | Dec 1, 2012
Cell-based assays are popular for high-throughput screens, where they strike a balance between ease of use and similarity to the human body that researchers aim to treat.