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The face of a young woman and the face of an old man surrounded by mechanical clocks.
Daily Gene Expression Rhythms Vary with Sex and Age: Study
By studying tissues from deceased people, a team found that women have more rhythmical gene expression and that this molecular rhythmicity decreases with age.
Daily Gene Expression Rhythms Vary with Sex and Age: Study
Daily Gene Expression Rhythms Vary with Sex and Age: Study

By studying tissues from deceased people, a team found that women have more rhythmical gene expression and that this molecular rhythmicity decreases with age.

By studying tissues from deceased people, a team found that women have more rhythmical gene expression and that this molecular rhythmicity decreases with age.

cholesterol
Illustration of HIV virus
Viral Protein Behind Chronic Inflammation in People with HIV: Study
Natalia Mesa, PhD | Dec 12, 2022 | 3 min read
The HIV protein Nef can cause long-term genetic changes that lead to hyperreactive immune cells, according to research in human cells and mice. 
Illustration of myelinated neuron axons in light blue, with spindly blue and purple cells interspersed among them.
A Gene Variant Linked to Alzheimer’s May Disrupt Myelin Production
Andy Carstens | Nov 22, 2022 | 5 min read
The APOE4 variant causes cholesterol buildup in the cells that make protective fatty sheaths for neurons, possibly helping explain its role in neurodegeneration.
Maintaining Hormone Balance Through RNA Decay
The Scientist Speaks - What Comes Up Must Go Down: Maintaining Hormone Balance Through RNA Decay
The Scientist’s Creative Services Team | 1 min read
Neelanjan Mukherjee discusses how RNA decay is essential for regulating a blood pressure-controlling hormone.
outline of a brain slice with white patch surrounded by teal
Astrocytes Feed Glioblastoma, Promoting Tumor Growth: Mouse Study
Patience Asanga | Oct 5, 2022 | 3 min read
Starving glioblastoma tumors of the cholesterol made by astrocytes could suppress brain cancer progression.
A gloved hand holds a tweezer and pulls a section of DNA away from a double helix
First Person Dosed in Novel Gene Editing Clinical Trial
Amanda Heidt | Jul 12, 2022 | 4 min read
The biotech company Verve Therapeutics launched the study with the aim of using base editing to treat a genetic condition that causes high cholesterol and increases a person's risk of developing cardiovascular disease.
40422-lt-highqualityscreening-800x560
High-Quality Screening and Target Validation During Drug Development
The Scientist Creative Services Team in collaboration with Thermo Fisher Scientific | 1 min read
Drew Adams will discuss his work developing therapeutics that promote remyelination for neurological diseases.
An orange-brown pineapple sea cucumber, covered in wart-like growths, rests on the seafloor in front of some coral, with a school of fish swimming overhead.
How the Sea Cucumber Defends Itself . . . From Itself
Natalia Mesa, PhD | Jul 1, 2022 | 3 min read
The marine animals have evolved a unique molecular pathway enabling them to use toxins to fight off invaders without poisoning themselves in the process.
Scientific illustration of a migrating breast cancer cell.
Breast Cancer Cells Churn Out Cholesterol to Fuel Metastasis
Alejandra Manjarrez, PhD | Feb 4, 2022 | 4 min read
A study uncovers a novel connection between the biomolecule and cancer progression.
An illustration shows circular red blood cells running into a yellow cholesterol blockage in a transverse section of an artery on a blue and purple background
Genetic Variant Discovered in Amish Protects from Heart Disease
Abby Olena, PhD | Dec 2, 2021 | 3 min read
Researchers link a missense mutation in the B4GALT1 gene to lower levels of LDL cholesterol and the blood clotting factor fibrinogen.
An illustration of a woman in bed unable to sleep. The bedside clock reads 2:30. Her brain and heart are glowing.
Infographic: Pathways from Noise to Cardiovascular Damage
Thomas Münzel and Omar Hahad | Jun 1, 2021 | 2 min read
Research in mice and humans points to oxidative stress and inflammation as likely drivers of noise-induced health effects such as hypertension and heart disease.
Clip art of a crane, car, and plane flying over a city outside the window of two people in bed not sleeping, with a starry night background
How Environmental Noise Harms the Cardiovascular System
Thomas Münzel and Omar Hahad | Jun 1, 2021 | 10+ min read
Sound from cars, aircraft, trains, and other man-made machines is more than just annoying. It increases the risk of cardiovascular disease.
Robert Simoni, Stanford University, biochemistry, cholesterol, cell membrane, obituary
Robert Simoni, Cellular Membrane Biochemist, Dies at 81
Amanda Heidt | Sep 25, 2020 | 3 min read
Simoni spent more than four decades at Stanford University as a teacher, researcher, and administrator in the university’s biology department.
Could Statins Reduce the Severity of COVID-19?
Ashley Yeager | Jun 12, 2020 | 7 min read
The cholesterol-lowering drugs quell inflammation and reverse endothelial tissue damage, hints that they might curb the body’s excessive immune response to SARS-CoV-2 infection.
Novartis’s $9.7 Billion Purchase Includes Novel PCSK9 Inhibitor
Emily Makowski | Nov 25, 2019 | 2 min read
The pharmaceutical firm is buying The Medicines Company, which recently devoted its efforts into developing the cholesterol-lowering medication.
a map showing the country of Uganda
Study of Ugandan Genomes Yields Novel Variants, Health Links
Shawna Williams | Oct 31, 2019 | 2 min read
The authors say their results demonstrate the global benefits of studying African genetics.
gallstones nets neutrophil extracellular traps
Immune “Webs” May Aid the Formation of Gallstones
Emma Yasinski | Aug 22, 2019 | 3 min read
Researchers find evidence of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), sticky clumps of DNA and protein extruded by neutrophils, holding gallstones together.
The Scientist’s Most Stunning Infographics of 2018
Jef Akst | Dec 21, 2018 | 2 min read
From cellular self-digestion to the effects of exercise on the brain, our features editor picks her favorite art custom-made for the magazine.
Limited Meal Times Prevent Obesity in Mice Prone to Gaining Weight
Abby Olena, PhD | Aug 30, 2018 | 3 min read
Even in mice with a busted circadian clock and an unhealthy diet, carefully timed feeding overcomes the rodents’ predispositions for metabolic diseases.
Gene Editing Reduces Monkeys’ Cholesterol
Ashley Yeager | Jul 10, 2018 | 2 min read
The results could lead to a treatment to lower cholesterol in patients with hypercholesterolemia.
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