WITH VIDEO
Chimp Groups Have Their Own Distinct “Handshakes”
Chimp Groups Have Their Own Distinct “Handshakes”
A 12-year study shows variation among primate groups in how the animals clasp hands during grooming, but consistency within them, even as group membership shifts over time.
Chimp Groups Have Their Own Distinct “Handshakes”
Chimp Groups Have Their Own Distinct “Handshakes”

A 12-year study shows variation among primate groups in how the animals clasp hands during grooming, but consistency within them, even as group membership shifts over time.

A 12-year study shows variation among primate groups in how the animals clasp hands during grooming, but consistency within them, even as group membership shifts over time.

culture
How STEM Can Be More Inclusive of Scientists with Disabilities
How STEM Can Be More Inclusive of Scientists with Disabilities
Amanda Heidt | Jun 7, 2021
The culture of academia can make disabled scientists wary of disclosing their conditions or needs. Molecular biologist Justin Yerbury suggests how the system might become more inclusive. 
Scientists Reconstruct Warrior Pharaoh’s Murder Using CT Scans
Scientists Reconstruct Warrior Pharaoh’s Murder Using CT Scans
Stephenie Livingston | Feb 17, 2021
A forensic investigation of Seqenenre Taa II’s traumatic injuries suggests he died with his hands tied behind his back, perhaps the end result of fighting to liberate his kingdom.
Opinion: Blowing the Whistle on Research Grant Fraud
Opinion: Blowing the Whistle on Research Grant Fraud
Joseph Gentile | Jan 1, 2021
Reporting cases of misconduct in the context of federal science funding can be a daunting task. But mechanisms to support whistleblowers do exist.
Book Excerpt from <em>When Brains Dream</em>
Book Excerpt from When Brains Dream
Robert Stickgold, Antonio Zadra | Dec 1, 2020
Ferreting out the biological function of dreaming is a frontier in neuroscience.
Ten Minute Sabbatical
Ten Minute Sabbatical
The Scientist Staff | Dec 1, 2020
Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.
Citations Are the Currency of Science
Citations Are the Currency of Science
Sibrandes Poppema | Dec 1, 2020
Then there are the counterfeiters.
Science Is My Copilot
Science Is My Copilot
Bob Grant | Dec 1, 2020
As the world around us seems increasingly volatile, protecting and respecting the integrity of research and evidence becomes more important than ever.
Opinion: The Biological Function of Dreams
Opinion: The Biological Function of Dreams
Robert Stickgold, Antonio Zadra | Dec 1, 2020
The scenarios that run through our sleeping brains may help us explore possible solutions to concerns from our waking lives.
Black in X Addresses Long-Standing Inequity in STEM
Black in X Addresses Long-Standing Inequity in STEM
Lisa Winter | Nov 16, 2020
In a year of racial tumult, Black scientists are uniting for visibility and action. 
Book Excerpt from <em>Every Life is On Fire</em>
Book Excerpt from Every Life is On Fire
Jeremy England | Nov 1, 2020
In Chapter 7, “Wind and Breath,” author Jeremy England considers research findings that point to a surprising, emergent property of seemingly disordered molecules.
Reconsidering Life&rsquo;s Origin
Reconsidering Life’s Origin
Jeremy England | Nov 1, 2020
Is the model of early life as a freak occurrence in a disordered, primordial soup of chemicals wrong?
Looming Change
Looming Change
Bob Grant | Nov 1, 2020
While the world is still coming to grips with the new reality wrought by COVID-19, the risk of catastrophe from a warming planet persists.
Book Excerpt from <em>The Nature of Fear</em>
Book Excerpt from The Nature of Fear
Daniel T. Blumstein | Oct 21, 2020
In the book’s prologue, author Daniel T. Blumstein explains his introduction to the study of fear.
Opinion: What Animals Can Teach Us About Fear
Opinion: What Animals Can Teach Us About Fear
Daniel T. Blumstein | Oct 1, 2020
Fear binds us to our human and nonhuman ancestors. Understanding the emotion can help us grapple with challenges we face today.
Book Excerpt from <em>How Zoologists Organize Things</em>
Book Excerpt from How Zoologists Organize Things
David Bainbridge | Sep 1, 2020
In Chapter 1, “An ABC of Early Classification,” author David Bainbridge explores the theological roots of zoology.
The Peopling of South America
The Peopling of South America
Shawna Williams | Sep 1, 2020
While questions still outnumber answers, new findings from archaeology, genetics, and other disciplines are revealing surprising insights into the early cultures of the most recently populated continent.