fossil
Image of the Day: Bird Braincase
Image of the Day: Bird Braincase
The Scientist Staff | May 4, 2018
Newly discovered fossils shed light on the structure of the feeding apparatus of ancient seabirds.
<em>Homo Sapiens</em> Fossil Pushes Back Date of Human Migration from Africa
Homo Sapiens Fossil Pushes Back Date of Human Migration from Africa
Jim Daley | Apr 9, 2018
An 88,000-year-old finger bone places human ancestors in Arabia earlier than previously believed.
Image of the Day: Primordial Sculpture
Image of the Day: Primordial Sculpture
The Scientist Staff | Sep 20, 2017
This lifelike replica of the one-centimeter, 500-million-year-old arthropod Agnostus pisiformis was reconstructed from the animal’s ancient fossils.
Image of the Day: Wait For It
Image of the Day: Wait For It
The Scientist Staff | May 17, 2017
A current moved this prehistoric ammonite’s lifeless shell across the seafloor, producing an almost 28-foot-long fossilized scratch. 
From Smugglers to Scientists: New Dino Species Described
From Smugglers to Scientists: New Dino Species Described
Erin Hare | May 9, 2017
The infamous "Baby Louie" embryo is a giant oviraptorosaur fossil from China that resembled a gargantuan bird.
Image of the Day: Bygone Blood Cells
Image of the Day: Bygone Blood Cells
The Scientist Staff | Apr 10, 2017
These fossilized red blood cells (right), found in an ancient, blood-engorged Amblyomma tick (left), likely belonged to primates.
Fossilized Dinosaur Brain Found
Fossilized Dinosaur Brain Found
Joshua A. Krisch | Oct 31, 2016
Prehistoric soft tissue can be hard to come by. The preserved remains of dinosaur brains have long remained elusive—until now.
A Tiny Missing Link?
A Tiny Missing Link?
Bob Grant | Nov 2, 2015
The common ancestor of all apes, including great apes and humans, may have been not-so-great in stature.
Enamel’s Origins
Enamel’s Origins
Karen Zusi | Sep 25, 2015
Fossil and genetic evidence indicates tooth enamel originated in the scales of ancient fish.
Ancient Reproduction
Ancient Reproduction
Kerry Grens | Aug 5, 2015
Deep-sea rangeomorphs that lived more than 540 million years ago used two methods of reproduction, according to a study of fossils.