Drawing of fish along with internal organs
Researchers Visualize Heart From 380-Million-Year-Old Fish
A team of researchers in Australia have imaged fossilized soft organs of early jawed vertebrates for the first time, finding that our ancient fish ancestors’ hearts, livers, and stomachs are strikingly similar to ours.
Researchers Visualize Heart From 380-Million-Year-Old Fish
Researchers Visualize Heart From 380-Million-Year-Old Fish

A team of researchers in Australia have imaged fossilized soft organs of early jawed vertebrates for the first time, finding that our ancient fish ancestors’ hearts, livers, and stomachs are strikingly similar to ours.

A team of researchers in Australia have imaged fossilized soft organs of early jawed vertebrates for the first time, finding that our ancient fish ancestors’ hearts, livers, and stomachs are strikingly similar to ours.

fossil
Artist’s rendering of an early mammal called a mammaliamorph
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T. rex-like dinosaur head covered in knobby structures
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Four fossil skulls<br><br>
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early giraffe relative at the bottom and modern giraffes at top
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An artist's rendering of the ancient arthropod Erratus sperare
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Illustration of a Tyrannosaurus rex on a rock on a mountain
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The fossil tooth found in the Annamite Mountains in Laos
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zebrafish (Danio rerio)
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A fossil imprint of the stridulatory apparatus from an extinct cricket species
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A fossil imprint of the stridulatory apparatus from an extinct cricket species
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Drawing of white squid-like animal in blue water
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Image showing diatom fluorescence
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Reconstruction of an indeterminate theropod running on lacustrine sediments during low water timespan
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Fossils of African Fauna
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Caudipteryx Dinosaur Flock stock photo
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Megalodon from prehistoric times scene 3D illustration
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Plant cryptospore fossil found in 480 million-year-old Australian rock
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