Person taking antibiotic pill
What Happens to the Gut Microbiome After Taking Antibiotics?
Studies are finding that a single course of antibiotics alters the gut microbiomes of healthy volunteers—and that it can take months or even years to recover the original species composition.
ABOVE: ©ISTOCK.COM, nadia_bormotova
What Happens to the Gut Microbiome After Taking Antibiotics?
What Happens to the Gut Microbiome After Taking Antibiotics?

Studies are finding that a single course of antibiotics alters the gut microbiomes of healthy volunteers—and that it can take months or even years to recover the original species composition.

Studies are finding that a single course of antibiotics alters the gut microbiomes of healthy volunteers—and that it can take months or even years to recover the original species composition.

ABOVE: ©ISTOCK.COM, nadia_bormotova
gut microbiota
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