Miami skyline of skyscrapers next to ocean
How a Prominent Mexican Scientist Wound Up a Spy for Russia
Hector Cabrera Fuentes, a renowned cardiovascular researcher, collaborated with Russian intelligence agents for more than a year, prosecutors said.
ABOVE: © iStock.com, photosvit
How a Prominent Mexican Scientist Wound Up a Spy for Russia
How a Prominent Mexican Scientist Wound Up a Spy for Russia

Hector Cabrera Fuentes, a renowned cardiovascular researcher, collaborated with Russian intelligence agents for more than a year, prosecutors said.

Hector Cabrera Fuentes, a renowned cardiovascular researcher, collaborated with Russian intelligence agents for more than a year, prosecutors said.

ABOVE: © iStock.com, photosvit

heart attack

A white coat-wearing doctor holds the results of an EKG test in one hand and traces over them with a pen in the other hand
Doctors and Researchers Probe How COVID-19 Attacks the Heart
Dan Robitzski | Jan 12, 2022
Experts have a decent grasp on how COVID-19 impacts cardiovascular health in the near term. The implications of long COVID, however, remain mysterious.
knitted pink heart with a mended hole
CAR T Cells Mend Broken Mouse Hearts
Sophie Fessl | Jan 6, 2022
Specialized immune cells generated in vivo reduce cardiac scar tissue in mice, a new study shows.
Improving Cardiac Cell Therapy Persistence
The Scientist Speaks Ep. 13 - The Long Haul: Improving Cardiac Cell Therapy Persistence
Niki Spahich, PhD | Jan 26, 2021
Researchers remuscularize the heart after cardiac infarction with stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and ready-made microvessels.
Mouse heart cells that have taken up adipocyte-derived extracellular vesicles (stained red)
Fat Cells Send Mitochondrial Distress Signals to the Heart
Ruth Williams | Aug 20, 2021
Vesicles containing fragments of the organelles released from stressed adipocytes protect the heart against oxygen deprivation, a study in mice shows.
An illustration of a woman in bed unable to sleep. The bedside clock reads 2:30. Her brain and heart are glowing.
Infographic: Pathways from Noise to Cardiovascular Damage
Thomas Münzel, Omar Hahad | Jun 1, 2021
Research in mice and humans points to oxidative stress and inflammation as likely drivers of noise-induced health effects such as hypertension and heart disease.
Clip art of a crane, car, and plane flying over a city outside the window of two people in bed not sleeping, with a starry night background
How Environmental Noise Harms the Cardiovascular System
Thomas Münzel, Omar Hahad | Jun 1, 2021
Sound from cars, aircraft, trains, and other man-made machines is more than just annoying. It increases the risk of cardiovascular disease.
breast cancer, cardiovascular disease, heart attack, chemotherapy, cancer, cancer risk, women's health, oncology
Heart Attack Elevates Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence: Study
Amanda Heidt | Jul 13, 2020
Mice that experienced heart attacks underwent a large-scale shift in their immune systems that allowed cancer to flourish, perhaps explaining the observation in patients.
Image of the Day: Repairing Hearts
Emily Makowski | Jan 7, 2020
A growth factor treatment helps improve cardiac functioning after heart attack in pigs.
immune cells t cell natural kill cell cardiac stem cell ipsc
Gene Editing Makes Cells Evade Immune Attack In Vitro
Emma Yasinski | Dec 12, 2019
To advance the possibility of off-the-shelf cardiac cell therapies, scientists devise an engineered cardiac stem cell that avoids stimulating a detrimental immune attack.
cardiac stem cell therapy immune system macrophage
Activation of the Immune System Underlies Cardiac Cell Therapies
Ruth Williams | Nov 27, 2019
A study in mice reveals that stem cell transplants, currently in clinical trials, may not actually require the cells.
Novartis’s $9.7 Billion Purchase Includes Novel PCSK9 Inhibitor
Emily Makowski | Nov 25, 2019
The pharmaceutical firm is buying The Medicines Company, which recently devoted its efforts into developing the cholesterol-lowering medication.
an illustration of the inside of a blood vessel with a buildup of plaque
Gene Mutation Could Explain Humans’ High Risk of Heart Attack
Shawna Williams | Jul 23, 2019
Mutating a gene called CMAH in mice so it’s nonfunctional, as in humans, upped the animals’ chances of developing heart disease, a study finds.
Image of the Day: Scarred Hearts
Ashley Yeager | Dec 4, 2018
Maps of diving cells before and after heart attacks in mice offer additional evidence against the existence of cardiac stem cells.
Mitochondrial Infusions Given to Babies with Heart Damage
Kerry Grens | Jul 10, 2018
Among 11 infants treated to date, most survived and their heart function improved.
Cardiac Cell Transplants Help Monkeys’ Hearts
Ashley Yeager | Jul 2, 2018
The organ’s blood-pumping capacity improved with the infusion of cells, a study shows.
Image of the Day: Cold Hearted 
The Scientist Staff, The Scientist Staff | Jan 22, 2018
Cardiologists have found a way to cool the human heart in a localized way to help reduce muscle damage from heart attacks. 
Why Afternoon Open Heart Surgery Is Better for Patient Outcomes
Catherine Offord | Oct 27, 2017
Research in human patients and mice reveals the role of the circadian clock in the risk of heart damage at different times of day.
Image of the Day: Un-break My Heart
The Scientist Staff | Aug 8, 2017
A failing heart is easily distinguished from a healthy one by numerous tell-tale signs, including its slender, stretched-out walls, increased size, and pooled blood clots.
Bright Lights and Bacteria Treat Rats’ Heart Attacks
Ruth Williams | Jun 14, 2017
Injecting photosynthetic microbes into oxygen-starved heart tissue can improve cardiac function in rodents.