Image of the Day: Are You My Mother?
Image of the Day: Are You My Mother?
The captive breeding program at the Vulture Conservation Foundation gives a bearded vulture chick the chance to live in the wild.
Image of the Day: Are You My Mother?
Image of the Day: Are You My Mother?

The captive breeding program at the Vulture Conservation Foundation gives a bearded vulture chick the chance to live in the wild.

The captive breeding program at the Vulture Conservation Foundation gives a bearded vulture chick the chance to live in the wild.

imprinting
bar-headed geese fly over the Himalayas
Bar-Headed Geese Slow Their Metabolism to Soar over Everest
Nicoletta Lanese | Sep 4, 2019
The birds also decrease their heart rate and chill their blood to maintain flight in hypoxic conditions.
Researchers Aim to Reestablish an Ancient Fish in an Ohio River
Shawna Williams | Jan 1, 2019
The sturgeon restoration study’s outcome won’t be known for decades.
The Epigenetic Origins of Allergy and Asthma
The Scientist Speaks Ep. 15 - The Epigenetic Origins of Allergy and Asthma
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Feb 26, 2021
Epigenetic marks acquired from environmental exposures throughout life influence human health and may even transcend generations.
Study: Ducklings Can Think Abstractly
Alison F. Takemura | Jul 17, 2016
When imprinted on toy blocks, the young birds gravitate toward new toys that are the same shape or color as the originals, according to a study.
Leaving an Imprint
Anna Azvolinsky | Aug 1, 2015
Among the first to discover epigenetic reprogramming during mammalian development, Wolf Reik has been studying the dynamics of the epigenome for 30 years.
Mr. Epigenetics
The Scientist Staff | Jul 31, 2015
Meet Wolf Reik, August Profilee and Babraham Institute director of research.
Imprinting Diversity
Cristina Luiggi | Feb 28, 2011
Joachim Messing talks about how genomic imprinting may be a strong driver of diversity.