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an <em>Aedes aegypti&nbsp;</em>mosquito, black with white dots and stripes on its joints and body, sitting on a person&#39;s skin and feeding.
Smelly Skin Compounds Draw Mosquitoes to Some People More than Others
People with more carboxylic acids in their body odor are more attractive to mosquitoes, a study finds.
Smelly Skin Compounds Draw Mosquitoes to Some People More than Others
Smelly Skin Compounds Draw Mosquitoes to Some People More than Others

People with more carboxylic acids in their body odor are more attractive to mosquitoes, a study finds.

People with more carboxylic acids in their body odor are more attractive to mosquitoes, a study finds.

insect olfaction
Vector image of swarming locusts in a field
Scents and Sense-Abilities: Using Bug Brainpower to Smell Cancer
Iris Kulbatski, PhD | Dec 12, 2022 | 4 min read
Scientists use locust brains as living biosensors to perform cancer cell breath tests.
Close-up of a mosquito antenna with hair-like protrusions and fluorescently labeled glomeruli as green circles on the shaft
The Neuroscience Behind Why Mosquitoes Always Find You
Sophie Fessl, PhD | Aug 18, 2022 | 5 min read
Neurons in mosquito antennae can express more than one olfactory receptor at a time, a redundancy that likely ensures they don’t lose a potential host’s scent.
A close-up of a fruit fly head with antenna clearly visible in front of its red eyes
Bacterial Infections Disrupt Flies’ Sense of Smell
Abby Olena, PhD | Jul 21, 2021 | 4 min read
The temporary loss of olfaction stops the flies from eating any more of whatever it is that made them sick.
Image of the Day: Moth Proboscis
The Scientist Staff and The Scientist Staff | Mar 5, 2018 | 2 min read
The hawkmoth’s brain uses a different area to search for food than it does to look for where to lay eggs.  
Bug Off
Kerry Grens | Oct 3, 2013 | 1 min read
Identification of a DEET-sensitive olfactory receptor leads to alternative, possibly better, repellants.
An Olfaction Odyssey
Megan Scudellari | Oct 1, 2013 | 9 min read
Thanks to a book, a war, and a big green caterpillar, John Hildebrand found himself mapping the exquisite and surprising wiring of the insect olfactory system.
Speaking of Science
The Scientist Staff | Oct 1, 2013 | 2 min read
October 2013's selection of notable quotes
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