Artist’s rendering of multiple natural killer cells, colored light pink, attacking a purple tumor cell.
Protein Pilfered from Cancer Cells Thwarts Immune Attack
New research in mice reveals why natural killer cells, normally effective at hunting cancer, are sometimes stopped in their tracks.  
ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, SELVANEGRA
Protein Pilfered from Cancer Cells Thwarts Immune Attack
Protein Pilfered from Cancer Cells Thwarts Immune Attack

New research in mice reveals why natural killer cells, normally effective at hunting cancer, are sometimes stopped in their tracks.  

New research in mice reveals why natural killer cells, normally effective at hunting cancer, are sometimes stopped in their tracks.  

ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, SELVANEGRA

leukemia

Man in lab coat sitting at a lab bench looking at small, stoppered beaker.
Cancer Researcher Donald Pinkel Dies at Age 95
Natalia Mesa | Mar 18, 2022
Unsatisfied by how treatments for childhood leukemia failed to prevent the disease’s return, Pinkel combined them all—and virtually cured the disease.
Artist's rendition of a yellow CAR T cell near a red cancer cell surrounded by red blood cells.
Ten Years On, CAR T Cell Recipient Is Still Cancer-Free
Jef Akst | Feb 3, 2022
First, the genetically engineered cells became CD8+ killer T cells that wiped out his leukemia. Then they transformed into a stable population of CD4+ helper T cells that continue to circulate in his body.
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LabTalk Podcast - Hijacking Genes: Uncovering the Cause of Lineage Ambiguous Leukemia
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Oct 28, 2021
Chromosomal rearrangements reposition influential and often overlooked non-coding elements in the genome to hijack genes and cause cancer.
grey and purple cancer cells under a microscope
Cell Diversity Could Spell Trouble for Animal Models of Cancer
David Adam | Nov 19, 2021
Tracking human cancers in mice shows some unexpected cell changes that could undermine translational research.  
a man in a white t-shirt and face mask receives a bandage on his arm from a clinician wearing blue gloves and a plastic face shield
COVID-19 Vaccines Work in People with Cancer: Study
Marcus A. Banks | Jun 25, 2021
Moderna’s, Pfizer’s, and Johnson & Johnson’s shots all offered protection against the virus regardless of cancer type, although slightly less so in people with blood cancer.
Understanding Cancer Evolution Through the Lens of Single Cell Genomics
Understanding Cancer Evolution Through the Lens of Single Cell Genomics
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Oct 14, 2021
Nicholas Navin and Lars Velten discuss sampling, sequencing, and tracing single cells to study how cancer cells adapt to various environments.
illustrations of cancer cells dividing in pink tones
Cancer Metastasizes Via Fusion of Tumor and Immune Cells: Study
Marcus A. Banks | Jun 17, 2021
Researchers say evidence of hybridization between leukocytes and cancer indicates that this is a primary means of metastasis. Others disagree.
Bispecific Antibodies Treat Cancer in Mouse Models
Abby Olena | Mar 5, 2021
A trio of papers shows that specialized antibodies can direct T cells to destroy cells that display portions of mutant cancer-related proteins, as well as T cells that have become cancerous themselves.
Enhancing the Efficacy of CAR-T Cell Therapies
The Scientist Creative Services Team in Collaboration with IsoPlexis | Jun 29, 2021
Jessica Morris will discuss strategies to improve CAR-T cell targeting, activation, and killing capabilities.
cancer blood hematologic leukemia solid tumor covid-19 sars-cov-2 coronavirus pandemic mortality t cell b cd8+ cd4+ immunology chemotherapy
COVID-19 More Deadly with Blood than Solid Cancer: Study
Marcus A. Banks | Feb 16, 2021
Death rates among blood cancer patients who contract COVID-19 are higher than for those with other cancers, pointing to impaired immunity that makes it hard to overcome the virus.
Emil Freireich, cancer, leukemia, platelets, blood, chemotherapy, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Pioneering Cancer Researcher Emil Freireich Dies at 93
Asher Jones | Feb 5, 2021
The oncologist developed lifesaving childhood leukemia treatments and revolutionized chemotherapy.
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Baking Soda Boosts T Cells’ Ability to Fight Leukemia
Rachael Moeller Gorman | Nov 2, 2020
Infusions of donor T cells to fight the cancer often fail, but sodium bicarbonate can counter lactic acid produced by leukemia cells, potentially improving remission rates in mice and humans.
Paul Marks, Past President of MSKCC, Dies
Catherine Offord | May 8, 2020
A cancer researcher with a talent for leadership, Marks turned the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center into one of the world’s foremost oncology research institutions.
Cracking Down on Cancer: A Profile of Owen Witte
Diana Kwon | Apr 1, 2020
Through his studies on cancer-causing viruses, the University of California, Los Angeles, professor has helped develop lifesaving treatments.
Leukemia Relapses May Arise From Specialized Cells
Sukanya Charuchandra | Dec 1, 2018
Targeting the transient group of cells could prevent recurrence of the disease.
Genome, Exome, RNA Sequencing Applied to Pediatric Cancer Cases
Ashley Yeager | Oct 18, 2018
Combining data from the genetic testing techniques can guide patient care, scientists say.
EPA Stalls Release of Carcinogen Report
Sukanya Charuchandra | Jul 9, 2018
An investigation by Politico finds the agency has been sitting on an assessment of formaldehyde’s cancer risks for a year and a half.
Prevalent Form of Childhood Leukemia May Be Preventable
Sukanya Charuchandra | May 22, 2018
Early exposure to common microbes could stop leukemia from manifesting in children.
Genetic Screens Provide Clues About Prognosis, Risk of Second Cancer
Shawna Williams | Apr 1, 2018
Mutations in the TP53 gene appear to influence the prognosis and likelihood of future cancers in pediatric leukemia patients.