Group of cells stained in either blue or green in a black background.
Diabetes Marker Linked to COVID-19 Severity in Mice
A sugar that’s less abundant in the blood of people with diabetes binds to SARS-CoV-2’s spike protein and disrupts the virus’s ability to fuse with cells.  
ABOVE: Modified from Fig. 4G in Nat Metab, DOI: 10.1038/s42255-022-00567-z, 2022.
Diabetes Marker Linked to COVID-19 Severity in Mice
Diabetes Marker Linked to COVID-19 Severity in Mice

A sugar that’s less abundant in the blood of people with diabetes binds to SARS-CoV-2’s spike protein and disrupts the virus’s ability to fuse with cells.  

A sugar that’s less abundant in the blood of people with diabetes binds to SARS-CoV-2’s spike protein and disrupts the virus’s ability to fuse with cells.  

ABOVE: Modified from Fig. 4G in Nat Metab, DOI: 10.1038/s42255-022-00567-z, 2022.

mouse model

Artist’s rendering of multiple natural killer cells, colored light pink, attacking a purple tumor cell.
Protein Pilfered from Cancer Cells Thwarts Immune Attack
Dan Robitzski | Apr 13, 2022
New research in mice reveals why natural killer cells, normally effective at hunting cancer, are sometimes stopped in their tracks.  
Image of brain cells showing pyramidal neurons in green, astrocytes in red, and microglia in blue
Replacing Microglia Treats Neurodegenerative Disease in Mice
Shawna Williams | Mar 17, 2022
Researchers find a way to wipe out the brain’s immune cell corps and send in new and improved versions.
Antibiotics May Influence Brain Development
Antibiotics May Influence Brain Development
Roni Dengler, PhD | Jan 10, 2022
Low doses of continuous penicillin exposure altered mouse pups’ microbiomes and gene expression in brain areas associated with emotional and cognitive function.
illustration of thymus in white on a green background
New Mechanism for Virus-Triggered Autoimmunity Uncovered
Sophie Fessl | Mar 11, 2022
Roseolovirus infection disrupts how the body trains immune cells not to attack it, a mouse study shows.
Variety of sweeteners - Stevia, sugar, pollen and honey stock photo
How the Gut Differentiates Artificial Sweeteners from Sugars
Chloe Tenn | Jan 21, 2022
Signals from sweeteners and sugars are relayed from the gut to the brain by different neural pathways, a new study concludes.
Delivering Combination Immunotherapies to Solid Tumors
LabTalk Podcast - A Modern Trojan Horse: Delivering Combination Immunotherapies to Solid Tumors 
The Scientist Creative Services Team, IsoPlexis | Apr 26, 2021
Katie McKenna discusses a combination CAR T and viral therapy that kills solid tumors.
knitted pink heart with a mended hole
CAR T Cells Mend Broken Mouse Hearts
Sophie Fessl | Jan 6, 2022
Specialized immune cells generated in vivo reduce cardiac scar tissue in mice, a new study shows.
An illustration shows circular red blood cells running into a yellow cholesterol blockage in a transverse section of an artery on a blue and purple background
Genetic Variant Discovered in Amish Protects from Heart Disease
Abby Olena | Dec 2, 2021
Researchers link a missense mutation in the B4GALT1 gene to lower levels of LDL cholesterol and the blood clotting factor fibrinogen.
The Scientist Speaks Podcast - Episode 11
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Nov 18, 2020
A Path Back to Health: Immune Tolerance to Infectious Disease
grey and purple cancer cells under a microscope
Cell Diversity Could Spell Trouble for Animal Models of Cancer
David Adam | Nov 19, 2021
Tracking human cancers in mice shows some unexpected cell changes that could undermine translational research.  
Red blood cells are pictured in grayscale on a gray background
Red Blood Cells Activate Innate Immune System
Abby Olena | Oct 20, 2021
Researchers link the ability of the cells to bind and present DNA from pathogens and cell death to anemia, which is common in COVID-19, and immune activation.
group of paleolithic people around a campfire
Gene Variant Points to Starvation’s Evolutionary Legacy
Sophie Fessl | Sep 28, 2021
Ancient and modern genomes reveal that a variant of the human growth hormone receptor likely helped our ancestors survive when food was scarce.
ribbon model of phenylalanine hydroxylase enzyme
Noncoding RNA Improves Symptoms in Mice with Metabolic Disorder
Abby Olena | Aug 6, 2021
A long noncoding RNA from humans appeared to help the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase work better in a mouse model of phenylketonuria, the disorder characterized by reduced activity of that enzyme.
A black mouse runs on a yellow and green spinning wheel against a blue background
Exercising During Pregnancy Protects Mouse Offspring
Jack J. Lee | Aug 1, 2021
Obese mice that exercised while pregnant gave birth to pups that grew up free of the metabolic issues present in the adult young of sedentary obese mothers—possibly by staving off epigenetic changes to a key metabolic gene.
An illustrated schematic with a blue background describes how oxygenated perfluorocarbon can rescue respiratory failure in mammals.
Mammals Can Use Their Intestines to Breathe
Abby Olena | May 14, 2021
Researchers show that both mice and pigs are capable of oxygenating their blood via the colon—a capacity that, if shared by humans, could be leveraged in the clinic to minimize the need for mechanical ventilation.
illustration of different cells types in retina
Cones Derived from Human Stem Cells Help Mice See: Study
Marcus A. Banks | Apr 23, 2021
Researchers insert functioning cone photoreceptors into the retinas of mice with advanced eye disease, improving their vision.
Early Training Forestalls Motor, Memory Difficulties in Mouse Model of Rett Syndrome
Laura Dattaro | Mar 29, 2021
Manipulating the activity of neurons active during training had similar effects on the mice’s behavior.
A Tweak to Immune Cells Reverses Aging in Mice
Abby Olena | Jan 20, 2021
Knocking out the receptor for a lipid that causes inflammation rejuvenates macrophage metabolism and restores cognitive function in an Alzheimer’s disease model.
SARS-CoV-2 Exits Cells Via Lysosomes
Abby Olena | Nov 13, 2020
A study finds that β-coronaviruses don’t use the normal secretory pathway, a possible explanation for some aspects of COVID-19 pathology.