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Closeup of a pair of hands in blue gloves holding a white mouse and injecting it with an amber colored liquid.
Opioids Recruit the Immune System to Cause Withdrawal Symptoms
A study finds that T cells induced by heroin cross the blood-brain barrier to wreak havoc on the brain, hinting at new ways to prevent withdrawal.
Opioids Recruit the Immune System to Cause Withdrawal Symptoms
Opioids Recruit the Immune System to Cause Withdrawal Symptoms

A study finds that T cells induced by heroin cross the blood-brain barrier to wreak havoc on the brain, hinting at new ways to prevent withdrawal.

A study finds that T cells induced by heroin cross the blood-brain barrier to wreak havoc on the brain, hinting at new ways to prevent withdrawal.

mouse model
Microscopy image with blue and red neurons, where red indicates neurons involved in a memory engram
Asthma Drug Helps Mice Retrieve Memories “Lost” to Sleep Deprivation
Zunnash Khan | Jan 24, 2023 | 4 min read
A study finds roflumilast can reverse sleep deprivation–induced amnesia in mice, hinting at pathways to treating memory loss in people.
A younger-looking mouse next to an older-looking one
Epigenetic Manipulations Can Accelerate or Reverse Aging in Mice
Alejandra Manjarrez, PhD | Jan 12, 2023 | 4 min read
Repairing damaged DNA appears to drive aging by causing the loss of epigenetic information, but restoring that information reverses such effects, a study finds.
A nude (hairless) mouse, typically used in biomedical and drug discovery research methods that rely on immunodeficient mouse strains.
Brush Up: Humanized Mice: More than the Sum of Their Parts
Deanna MacNeil, PhD | 5 min read
Scientists study human health in vivo with modified mice that molecularly mimic human biology.
Pink neutrophils on a white background.
Mucus-Eating Gut Bacteria May Promote Fever After Cancer Treatment
Alejandra Manjarrez, PhD | Jan 5, 2023 | 3 min read
The expansion of mucus-degraders in the mouse gut—possibly due to poor nutrition—thins the colon’s mucus layer and may weaken defenses against blood-infecting microbes.
A collection of images from prior stories, including illustrations of DNA, chromosomes, and various cells, microscopy images of cancer cells, and a photo of a mouse on a treadmill.
Our Favorite Cancer Stories of 2022
Dan Robitzski | Dec 27, 2022 | 4 min read
This year, cancer researchers uncovered a variety of ways that tumors can survive and spread, ranging from damaging their own DNA to exploiting the nearby microenvironment for nutrients.
Staphylococcus aureus bacteria on the skin
The Scientist Speaks - Virulence Meets Metabolism: The Unique Evolution of Staphylococcus aureus
Niki Spahich, PhD | 1 min read
Anthony Richardson discusses what makes Staph especially dangerous for people with diabetes.
Artist’s rendition of the molecular structure of a ribosome (blue and purple) as it produces a polypeptide chain (red) from an mRNA template (orange and gray), with tRNA molecules (dark purple) shuttling amino acids.
Specialized Sperm Ribosomes Are Key to Male Fertility in Mice
Dan Robitzski | Dec 15, 2022 | 4 min read
A previously unknown kind of ribosome is responsible for folding sperm proteins, which decay before fertilization if prepared by other ribosomes.
Human hand with white glove holding a white mouse in a green background.
Study Traces a Neural Circuit Behind Green Light–Mediated Pain Relief
Alejandra Manjarrez, PhD | Dec 9, 2022 | 4 min read
A mouse study concludes color-detecting cones in the eye and a subset of neurons in the brain’s thalamus are why green light exposure has an analgesic effect.
Muscle immobilization leads to atrophy
Antioxidants Put the Pep Back in One’s Step
Niki Spahich, PhD | 3 min read
Delivering antioxidants via extracellular vesicles to atrophied muscles restores them during rehabilitation.
Artist’s rendition of neural connections, with inactive neurons in the background
Ketamine Flips a “Switch” in Mice’s Brain Circuitry: Study
Andy Carstens | Dec 9, 2022 | 6 min read
After injecting moderate doses of the dissociative anesthetic into the animals, previously “awake” brain cells go dark, and those that had been dormant suddenly light up.
A mouse in front of an open sack of grain.
Mice Fed a Highly Processed Diet Are More Susceptible to the Flu
Alejandra Manjarrez, PhD | Nov 18, 2022 | 3 min read
It’s not clear why grain-fed mice are better able to recover after infection, but a study’s findings suggest food type may skew the results of animal studies.
Antibiotics May Influence Brain Development
Antibiotics May Influence Brain Development
Roni Dengler, PhD | 3 min read
Low doses of continuous penicillin exposure altered mouse pups’ microbiomes and gene expression in brain areas associated with emotional and cognitive function.
Rendering of a light blue NLRP3 inflammasome against a black background
Inflammation in Brain’s Immune Cells Triggers Depressive Behavior in Mice
Dan Robitzski | Nov 17, 2022 | 5 min read
In stressful conditions, specialized protein complexes in microglia induce neurotoxic activity in astrocytes that leads to the change in behavior.
Micrograph image of cancer cells stained violet.
Oral Cancer Survives Starvation with Help from Nearby Nerves
Dan Robitzski | Nov 16, 2022 | 3 min read
Human and mouse oral tumors recruit nerves to produce peptides that the cancer cells need to survive—but this process can be blocked with a migraine drug.
Delivering Combination Immunotherapies to Solid Tumors
LabTalk Podcast - A Modern Trojan Horse: Delivering Combination Immunotherapies to Solid Tumors 
The Scientist Creative Services Team and IsoPlexis | 1 min read
Katie McKenna discusses a combination CAR T and viral therapy that kills solid tumors.
a small black mouse sits next to an obese black mouse on a white background
Obesity Protects Against Genital Herpes in Mice, Study Finds
Katherine Irving | Nov 11, 2022 | 3 min read
A high-fat diet induced changes to the animals’ vaginal microbiomes that boosted survival after exposure to the virus.
Purple and white fluorescent stain of cells
How Fat Cells Help Kick Parasites Out of Mice: Study
Natalia Mesa, PhD | Oct 14, 2022 | 3 min read
Immune cells get a lot of shine when it comes to fighting infection, but it turns out that fat might be just as important for removing parasitic invaders.
The Scientist Speaks Podcast - Episode 11
The Scientist Creative Services Team | 1 min read
A Path Back to Health: Immune Tolerance to Infectious Disease
A mouse brain showing activated neurons (white) in the brainstem 3 hours after LPS injection.
Research Pinpoints the Neurons Behind Feeling Sick
James M. Gaines | Sep 23, 2022 | 5 min read
Specific neurons in the brainstem control sickness behaviors not directly caused by a pathogen, such as tiredness and lack of appetite, a mouse study finds.
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