A mouse brain showing activated neurons (white) in the brainstem 3 hours after LPS injection.
Research Pinpoints the Neurons Behind Feeling Sick
Specific neurons in the brainstem control sickness behaviors not directly caused by a pathogen, such as tiredness and lack of appetite, a mouse study finds.
Research Pinpoints the Neurons Behind Feeling Sick
Research Pinpoints the Neurons Behind Feeling Sick

Specific neurons in the brainstem control sickness behaviors not directly caused by a pathogen, such as tiredness and lack of appetite, a mouse study finds.

Specific neurons in the brainstem control sickness behaviors not directly caused by a pathogen, such as tiredness and lack of appetite, a mouse study finds.

mouse model
artistic representation of jumping gene
Jumping Genes Can Cause Movement Disorder: Study
Sophie Fessl | Sep 13, 2022
Mice with overactive LINE-1 retrotransposons in their brains exhibit movement difficulties, suggesting the genetic elements may play a role in ataxia in humans. 
Illustration of a human and Neanderthal skull side by side.
Mutation Linked to Difference Between Human and Neanderthal Brains
Dan Robitzski | Sep 9, 2022
A single amino acid substitution in a protein causes increased neuron production in the frontal lobes of humans compared to Neanderthals—a tiny difference that could have given our species a cognitive edge, researchers say.
A nude (hairless) mouse, typically used in biomedical and drug discovery research methods that rely on immunodeficient mouse strains.
Brush Up: Humanized Mice: More than the Sum of Their Parts
Deanna MacNeil, PhD
Scientists study human health in vivo with modified mice that molecularly mimic human biology.
Karyotype with most chromosomes in blue, one in red and green. 
Researchers Fuse Mouse Chromosomes in Scientific First
Natalia Mesa | Aug 25, 2022
The findings will likely help elucidate the effects of chromosome fusions, which can cause disease but have also contributed to evolution.
Fluorescent microscopy of a healthy intestinal organoid and a tumor spheroid
Internal Clock Disruptions Increase Colon Cancer Risk in Mice
Shafaq Zia | Aug 19, 2022
Disturbing circadian rhythms in organoids and mice increases intestinal tumor growth, findings that may explain a recent rise in colon cancer among young adults, the researchers behind the work say.
Staphylococcus aureus bacteria on the skin
The Scientist Speaks - Virulence Meets Metabolism: The Unique Evolution of Staphylococcus aureus
Niki Spahich, PhD
Anthony Richardson discusses what makes Staph especially dangerous for people with diabetes.
Illustration of bacteriophages infecting a bacterium
Phages Treat Gut Inflammation in Mice
Andy Carstens | Aug 4, 2022
Mixtures of viruses that attack inflammatory bowel disease–causing bacteria in mice also survive the digestive tract and are well-tolerated in humans, a study finds.
microscope image series showing synthetic embryo development
Mouse Embryo: No Sperm, Egg, or Uterus Required
Christie Wilcox | Aug 2, 2022
Using stem cells and a bioreactor, researchers generated living embryos that survived for more than a week and began to develop internal organs.
Muscle immobilization leads to atrophy
Antioxidants Put the Pep Back in One’s Step
Niki Spahich, PhD
Delivering antioxidants via extracellular vesicles to atrophied muscles restores them during rehabilitation.
Pink and purple <em>Plasmodium</em> parasites inside red blood cells
Malarial Host-Parasite Clash Causes Deadly Blood Sugar Drop
Natalia Mesa | Jul 18, 2022
Scientists say they have finally figured out why some people with severe malaria end up with dangerous hypoglycemia, also reporting that the condition starves the parasite into changing tactics from virulence to transmission.
An illustration of a mitochondrion, represented by a purple and orange bilayer, synthesizing reddish molecules of ATP.

Mitochondrial Protein Fuels Spread of Head and Neck Cancer 

Patience Asanga | Jul 8, 2022
Head and neck cancer cells lacking the peptide involved in energy production were less likely to metastasize in mice.
Antibiotics May Influence Brain Development
Antibiotics May Influence Brain Development
Roni Dengler, PhD
Low doses of continuous penicillin exposure altered mouse pups’ microbiomes and gene expression in brain areas associated with emotional and cognitive function.
Artist&rsquo;s rendition of metastatic cancer cells with yellow nuclei and green cell bodies extending into blue tendrils.
While the Body Rests, Breast Cancer Spreads More Aggressively
Alejandra Manjarrez | Jun 23, 2022
More cancer cells are shed from primary tumors when individuals are asleep than when they’re awake, according to observations in mouse models and a small cohort of breast cancer patients.
Group of cells stained in either blue or green in a black background.
Diabetes Marker Linked to COVID-19 Severity in Mice
Alejandra Manjarrez | May 16, 2022
A sugar that’s less abundant in the blood of people with diabetes binds to SARS-CoV-2’s spike protein and disrupts the virus’s ability to fuse with cells.  
Delivering Combination Immunotherapies to Solid Tumors
LabTalk Podcast - A Modern Trojan Horse: Delivering Combination Immunotherapies to Solid Tumors 
The Scientist Creative Services Team and IsoPlexis
Katie McKenna discusses a combination CAR T and viral therapy that kills solid tumors.
Artist’s rendering of multiple natural killer cells, colored light pink, attacking a purple tumor cell.
Protein Pilfered from Cancer Cells Thwarts Immune Attack
Dan Robitzski | Apr 13, 2022
New research in mice reveals why natural killer cells, normally effective at hunting cancer, are sometimes stopped in their tracks.  
Image of brain cells showing pyramidal neurons in green, astrocytes in red, and microglia in blue
Replacing Microglia Treats Neurodegenerative Disease in Mice
Shawna Williams | Mar 17, 2022
Researchers find a way to wipe out the brain’s immune cell corps and send in new and improved versions.
The Scientist Speaks Podcast - Episode 11
The Scientist Creative Services Team
A Path Back to Health: Immune Tolerance to Infectious Disease
illustration of thymus in white on a green background
New Mechanism for Virus-Triggered Autoimmunity Uncovered
Sophie Fessl | Mar 11, 2022
Roseolovirus infection disrupts how the body trains immune cells not to attack it, a mouse study shows.