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An illustration of a light pink colon with a darker pink mass on the right side.
Biosensors for Colorectal Cancer
Engineered bacteria sound the alarm on a common oncogenic mutation.
Biosensors for Colorectal Cancer
Biosensors for Colorectal Cancer

Engineered bacteria sound the alarm on a common oncogenic mutation.

Engineered bacteria sound the alarm on a common oncogenic mutation.

oncogene

Composition of DNA with a glitch effect
“Silent” Mutations Make Noise In Cancer
Katarina Zimmer | May 1, 2023 | 10+ min read
Synonymous mutations have long been ignored in cancer studies since they don’t affect the amino acid sequences of proteins. But research increasingly reveals that they can have disease-driving effects.
Female reproductive System Anatomy stock photo
Cells in the Ovary are Responsive Shape-Shifters
Roni Dengler, PhD | Apr 8, 2022 | 3 min read
Rounds of trial-and-error exploring the layer of cells covering the ovary leave open questions about stem cells that are associated with ovarian cancer.
Epigenetic Influences and Mechanisms in Cancer
Epigenetic Influences and Mechanisms in Cancer
The Scientist Staff | 1 min read
In this webinar, Özgen Deniz and Christina Leslie will discuss how epigenetic regulation affects oncogenesis.
Cancer May Be Driven by DNA Outside of Chromosomes
Paul Mischel | Apr 1, 2021 | 10+ min read
In the last decade, researchers have come to realize that tumors harbor bits of extrachromosomal DNA that can drive malignancy.
Infographic: The Role of Extrachromosomal DNA in Cancer
Paul Mischel | Apr 1, 2021 | 2 min read
Researchers are uncovering how circular bits of DNA found in some cancer cells can help tumors evolve and kill.
Transforming Molecular Tools into Precision Oncology
Transforming Molecular Tools into Precision Oncology
The Scientist | 1 min read
Learn how researchers establish new technologies such as liquid biopsies and targeted biomarker detection to further enhance precision oncology.
Philip Leder, Who Deciphered Amino Acid Sequences, Dies
Ashley Yeager | Feb 12, 2020 | 4 min read
The Harvard Medical School researcher’s work on the genetic basis of protein coding and production led him to make groundbreaking discoveries in immunology, molecular biology, and cancer genetics.
First Direct-to-Consumer BRCA Test Authorized by FDA
Kerry Grens | Mar 6, 2018 | 2 min read
The agency gave personal genomics company 23andMe the green light to screen samples for breast cancer–related genetic mutations.
p53 as an Immune System Modulator in Cancer
The Scientist | 1 min read
Best known as a cell cycle regulator, p53 signaling mediates pro and anti-cancer immune responses as well
Study Raises Questions About Patient-Derived Xenografts
Ashley P. Taylor | Oct 10, 2017 | 2 min read
When transplanted into mice, tumor genomes evolve differently than they do in patients, study finds.
Pradeep Chaluvally-Raghavan: Curious about Cancer
Jef Akst | Apr 1, 2016 | 2 min read
Instructor, Department of Systems Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Age: 38
MYC Helps Cancer Hide
Anna Azvolinsky | Mar 10, 2016 | 3 min read
The transcriptional regulator dampens the immune system’s ability to elicit an antitumor response, a study shows.
Influential Cancer Biologist Dies
Kerry Grens | Aug 24, 2015 | 2 min read
Chris Marshall, who pieced together a critical signaling pathway involved in cancer, has passed away at age 66.
Professional Marksman
Anna Azvolinsky | Apr 1, 2015 | 8 min read
Charles Sawyers, who began his research career just as the genetic details of human oncogenes were emerging, codeveloped Gleevec, the quintessential targeted cancer therapy.
Setbacks and Great Leaps
Sue Armstrong | Apr 1, 2015 | 3 min read
The tale of p53, a widely studied tumor suppressor gene, illustrates the inventiveness of researchers who turn mishaps into discoveries.
Two-Faced RNAs
Kerry Grens | Apr 1, 2015 | 4 min read
The same microRNAs can have opposing roles in cancer.
Resisting Cancer
George Klein | Apr 1, 2015 | 9 min read
If one out of three people develops cancer, that means two others don’t. Understanding why could lead to insights relevant to prevention and treatment.
Book Excerpt from p53
Sue Armstrong | Mar 31, 2015 | 4 min read
In Chapter 12, "Of Mice and Men," author Sue Armstrong recounts the point at which researchers moved from working with p53 in tissue culture to studying the gene in animal models.
The Origins of Oversized Chromosomes
Molly Sharlach | Nov 12, 2014 | 2 min read
Researchers reconstruct the formation of the giant neochromosomes that contribute to some cancers.
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