A micrograph of the prion-like state of a protein called Pus4
Protein Mediates Non-Genetic Inheritance of Growth Strategies
An RNA-modifying enzyme passed to daughter cells during budding allows yeast cells to switch between faster- and slower-growing phenotypes.
Protein Mediates Non-Genetic Inheritance of Growth Strategies
Protein Mediates Non-Genetic Inheritance of Growth Strategies

An RNA-modifying enzyme passed to daughter cells during budding allows yeast cells to switch between faster- and slower-growing phenotypes.

An RNA-modifying enzyme passed to daughter cells during budding allows yeast cells to switch between faster- and slower-growing phenotypes.

prions
micrograph showing red aggregating protein in mouse neurons
Citing Safety, French Institutions Temporarily Halt Prion Research
Annie Melchor | Jul 28, 2021
The three-month moratorium comes after a former prion researcher was diagnosed with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.
Detecting Protein Clumps
Ruth Williams | Feb 1, 2018
A synthetic genetic tool called yTRAP allows high-throughput detection of protein aggregates in cells.
 
Neurons traversing the brain with an area of red neurodegeneration
LabTalk Podcast - The New Era of Neurodegeneration Research
The Scientist Creative Services Team
Erdem Gültekin Tamgüney discusses the future of neurodegeneration research and his work exploring the link between stroke and Parkinson’s disease.
Prions Found in Skin of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Patients
Jef Akst | Nov 23, 2017
Infectious protein aggregates from the skin of human patients can cause disease in mice.
Bacterial Protein Acts as Prion in Yeast and E. coli
Jef Akst | Jan 16, 2017
Clostridium botulinum produces a transcription factor that can aggregate and self-propagate a prion-like form, leading to genome-wide changes in gene expression in E. coli, according to a study.
Blood Tests for Prion Disease
Joshua A. Krisch | Dec 21, 2016
Two studies describe methods for detecting these misfolded proteins in human blood samples.
Protein Folding Pioneer Dies
Kerry Grens | Oct 28, 2016
Susan Lindquist of MIT and the Whitehead Institute broke scientific ground on prions and heat shock proteins.
Week in Review: September 5–9
Jef Akst | Sep 8, 2016
Environmental magnetite in the human brain; prion structure takes shape; watching E. coli evolve in real time; learning from others’ behavior 
First Glimpse at Infectious Prion Shape
Abby Olena | Sep 8, 2016
The preliminary structure of the misfolded protein that causes mad cow disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease looks like a coiled mattress spring.
Prions in Plants?
Tanya Lewis | Apr 26, 2016
A plant protein that behaves like a prion when inserted into yeast could enable a form of botanical memory, a study suggests.
Fearless about Folding
Anna Azvolinsky | Jan 1, 2016
Susan Lindquist has never shied away from letting her curiosity guide her research career.
Esteemed Virologist Dies
Karen Zusi | Dec 7, 2015
Richard Johnson, a pioneer in research on central nervous system infections, died last month at age 84.
Can Amyloid Spread Between Brains?
Jef Akst | Sep 9, 2015
A study of deceased patients who received injections of cadaver-derived growth hormone hints at the possible transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease. 
Neurodegeneration’s Spread
Ashley P. Taylor | Aug 3, 2014
Researchers show that pathogenic protein aggregates that accumulate within neurons and are a hallmark of Huntington’s disease can propagate from cell to cell.
Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation
Kate Yandell | Jun 22, 2014
ASC specks—protein aggregations that drive inflammation—are released from dying immune cells, expanding the reach of a defense response.
Capsule Reviews
Bob Grant | May 1, 2014
Madness and Memory, Promoting the Planck Club, The Carnivore Way, and The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons
Prions Important for Memories
Kerry Grens | Feb 19, 2014
The formation of long-term memories employs the chain-forming habits of prions.  
Stranger than Fiction
Mary Beth Aberlin | Jan 1, 2014
Plant biology: You can't make this stuff up.
The Bright Side of Prions
Randal Halfmann | Jan 1, 2014
Associated with numerous neurological diseases, misfolded proteins may also play decisive roles in normal cellular functioning.