Mammals Can Use Their Intestines to Breathe
Mammals Can Use Their Intestines to Breathe
Researchers show that both mice and pigs are capable of oxygenating their blood via the colon—a capacity that, if shared by humans, could be leveraged in the clinic to minimize the need for mechanical ventilation.
Mammals Can Use Their Intestines to Breathe
Mammals Can Use Their Intestines to Breathe

Researchers show that both mice and pigs are capable of oxygenating their blood via the colon—a capacity that, if shared by humans, could be leveraged in the clinic to minimize the need for mechanical ventilation.

Researchers show that both mice and pigs are capable of oxygenating their blood via the colon—a capacity that, if shared by humans, could be leveraged in the clinic to minimize the need for mechanical ventilation.

pulmonary disease
Disturbed Microbes Contribute to Lung Damage from Oxygen Treatment
Disturbed Microbes Contribute to Lung Damage from Oxygen Treatment
Ruth Williams | Aug 12, 2020
In humans, higher oxygen levels during ventilation are tied to an altered bacterial composition in the lungs, and mouse experiments show a causative link.
Blood Pressure Meds Point the Way to Possible COVID-19 Treatment
Blood Pressure Meds Point the Way to Possible COVID-19 Treatment
Ashley Yeager | Apr 2, 2020
There is little evidence that antihypertensive drugs worsen COVID-19, and scientists are instead exploring the idea that such medications—or their downstream effects—may actually alleviate symptoms.
Metabolites May Predict Lung Injury in 9/11 First Responders
Metabolites May Predict Lung Injury in 9/11 First Responders
Emma Yasinski | Sep 3, 2019
Firefighters who didn’t develop obstructive airway disease after the World Trade Center attacks had higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids and other factors that hint at possible protective effects of diet.