line illustration of DNA with single-strand break
Cancer Cells Break Own DNA to Defend Against Radiation
Self-inflicted DNA breaks let the cells hit pause on repair of radiation-induced DNA damage, giving them time to recover, an in vitro study shows.
ABOVE: © iStock.com, bubaone
Cancer Cells Break Own DNA to Defend Against Radiation
Cancer Cells Break Own DNA to Defend Against Radiation

Self-inflicted DNA breaks let the cells hit pause on repair of radiation-induced DNA damage, giving them time to recover, an in vitro study shows.

Self-inflicted DNA breaks let the cells hit pause on repair of radiation-induced DNA damage, giving them time to recover, an in vitro study shows.

ABOVE: © iStock.com, bubaone

radiation therapy

illustration of blue cancer cell extending tendrils around itself
Janus-Faced Neutrophils
Sophie Fessl | Mar 2, 2022
The immune cells facilitate healing, but they may also help tumors metastasize to the lungs after injury, a study in mice finds.
A medical linear accelerator used to deliver radiation therapy
Tool Would Use Tumor Gene Expression to Inform Radiation Dose
Alejandra Manjarrez | Aug 27, 2021
In a retrospective analysis, a team found that an algorithm integrating the gene expression of a tumor with the radiation dose a patient received predicted how well the patient responded to the treatment.
white and yellow colonies growing on a petri dish
Gut Fungi Hamper Radiation Therapy in Mice with Cancer
Rachael Moeller Gorman | Aug 11, 2021
Depleting intestinal fungi allows radiation to effectively fight cancer, likely because the microbes influence the antitumor immune response.
Bursting Cancer’s Bubble
Ruth Williams | Apr 1, 2015
Scientists make oxygen-filled microbubbles designed to increase tumor sensitivity to radiation.
Tumors Fall to Radioactive Bacteria
Sabrina Richards | Apr 22, 2013
Researchers use bacteria to deliver radiation to shrink pancreatic tumors in mice.