Acoustic camera readout
Science Snapshot: Identifying Individual Frogs In A Chorus
Using an acoustic camera, researchers were able to locate individual male wood frogs by their mating calls and determine which songs the females liked best.
ABOVE: Dartmouth College/Calsbeek Lab
Science Snapshot: Identifying Individual Frogs In A Chorus
Science Snapshot: Identifying Individual Frogs In A Chorus

Using an acoustic camera, researchers were able to locate individual male wood frogs by their mating calls and determine which songs the females liked best.

Using an acoustic camera, researchers were able to locate individual male wood frogs by their mating calls and determine which songs the females liked best.

ABOVE: Dartmouth College/Calsbeek Lab
sexual selection
A headshot of Matthew Gage
Evolutionary Ecologist Matthew Gage Dies at 55
Amanda Heidt | Apr 20, 2022
The University of East Anglia researcher was best known for his contributions to the study of sexual selection, particularly post-copulatory sperm competition.
Image of the Day: Plumage Patterns
Amy Schleunes | Mar 23, 2020
An island songbird evolved into five populations of different color variants despite inhabiting territories just 10 kilometers apart.
chimpanzee testes
Why Chimpanzees Have Big Testes, and Mandrills Have Small Ones
Katarina Zimmer | Apr 16, 2019
For primates, males’ fancier ornaments are linked with smaller testes, according to a new comparative study.
Larger Hermit Crab Penises May Prevent Shell Theft
Abby Olena | Jan 16, 2019
Members of species with shells they must hold onto for survival have larger sexual tubes than those with less precious private property.
Image of the Day: Beetle Fight
Jef Akst | Dec 3, 2018
The exaggerated horns and elongated forelegs of male flower beetles, which use these appendages as weapons in combat for females, do not slow down the insects in a race.
Image of the Day: Size Matters
The Scientist Staff, The Scientist Staff | Feb 23, 2018
The male proboscis monkey’s large nose probably evolved in response to female preference and competition between males.
Image of the Day: Glowing Chameleon
The Scientist Staff, The Scientist Staff | Jan 23, 2018
The lizards may be signaling one another using fluorescent cues that we can’t see.
The Genetic Strategies of Dealing with High Altitude
Abby Olena | Nov 2, 2017
Andean highlander genomes possess cardiovascular-related variants, while populations from other regions evolved different solutions to manage the lack of oxygen.
Female Fish Select Mates’ Sperm
Ben Andrew Henry | Aug 17, 2016
A protective coating on ocellated wrasse eggs helps female fish select sperm from nest-building males.
Scientists Solve Giant Sperm Paradox
Tanya Lewis | May 26, 2016
A study reveals why some male fruit flies produce sex cells that are 20 times the length of their bodies.
Lizard Swaps Mode of Deciding Its Sex
Kerry Grens | Jul 1, 2015
Sex assignment in bearded dragons can flip from one based on chromosomes to one driven by temperature, researchers report.
From the Feature Well
Jef Akst | Dec 29, 2014
A review of The Scientist’s 2014 special issues, highlighting trending areas of research across the life sciences
Connecting the Dots
Anna Azvolinsky | Aug 1, 2014
Extending her initial studies of social wasps, Mary Jane West-Eberhard has spent her career probing the evolutionary relationship between social behavior and developmental flexibility.
Carnal Knowledge
Bob Grant | Jul 1, 2014
Sex is an inherently fascinating aspect of life. As researchers learn more and more about it, surprises regularly emerge.
Contributors
Rina Shaikh-Lesko | Jul 1, 2014
Meet some of the people featured in the July 2014 issue of The Scientist
The Hidden Side of Sex
Patricia L.R. Brennan | Jul 1, 2014
Sexual selection doesn’t end when females choose a mate. Females and males of many animal species employ an array of tactics to stack the deck in their reproductive favor.
Doodoo Rendezvous
Bob Grant | Jun 30, 2014
Watch flightless dung beetles (Circellium bacchus), sneaky copulators and crap connoisseurs, do their thing in South Africa.
Faces for Fighting?
Jef Akst | Jun 10, 2014
Scientists propose that hominin facial bones evolved for protection against the powerful blows of combat.
For Some Male Crickets, Silence Means Survival
Sandhya Sekar | May 29, 2014
Two island populations of male crickets independently evolved to evade parasites by keeping quiet, and have come up with a way to sneak matings with females that still seek the male courtship song.