sea snake swimming in blue water
Sea Snake “Attacks” Are Cases of Mistaken Identity: Study
The Scientist spoke to marine biologist Tim Lynch, who dusted off 25-year-old data from his PhD to figure out why olive sea snakes approach divers so often. He says the animals, especially the males, likely confuse people for potential mates.
ABOVE: JACK BREEDON
Sea Snake “Attacks” Are Cases of Mistaken Identity: Study
Sea Snake “Attacks” Are Cases of Mistaken Identity: Study

The Scientist spoke to marine biologist Tim Lynch, who dusted off 25-year-old data from his PhD to figure out why olive sea snakes approach divers so often. He says the animals, especially the males, likely confuse people for potential mates.

The Scientist spoke to marine biologist Tim Lynch, who dusted off 25-year-old data from his PhD to figure out why olive sea snakes approach divers so often. He says the animals, especially the males, likely confuse people for potential mates.

ABOVE: JACK BREEDON
snake venom
snake venom stem cells
Snake Venom Gland Organoids Produce Functional Toxins
Amy Schleunes | Jan 24, 2020
Stem cells from nine snake species respond to tissue culturing techniques previously used only on mouse and human stem cells.
Caught on Camera
The Scientist Staff | Jan 1, 2018
Selected Images of the Day from the-scientist.com
Animal Analgesics
The Scientist Staff | Jan 1, 2018
A cornucopia of toxins in the animal kingdom could provide inspiration for novel painkillers, but so far, effective drugs have proven elusive.
 
Snake Venoms Cause and Block Pain
Kerry Grens | Jan 1, 2018
Painful snake bites may hold clues to developing analgesic drugs.
Image of the Day: Overkill
The Scientist Staff, The Scientist Staff | Oct 6, 2017
The Sakishima habu (pitviper; Protobothrops elegans) can compensate for inept traits in the chemical composition of its venom by overdosing its prey.