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a vial of cobra venom next two two agar plates with visible microbial colonies on them
Study Questions Sterility of Snake and Spider Venoms
In work that has not yet been peer-reviewed, researchers present evidence that microbes can and do live inside the venom glands of several dangerous species. It remains unclear whether they’re to blame for infections linked to bites.
Study Questions Sterility of Snake and Spider Venoms
Study Questions Sterility of Snake and Spider Venoms

In work that has not yet been peer-reviewed, researchers present evidence that microbes can and do live inside the venom glands of several dangerous species. It remains unclear whether they’re to blame for infections linked to bites.

In work that has not yet been peer-reviewed, researchers present evidence that microbes can and do live inside the venom glands of several dangerous species. It remains unclear whether they’re to blame for infections linked to bites.

wound healing
An underwater photo of the solitary tunicate Polycarpa mytiligera growing on a coral in the Red Sea
When Severed, This Solitary Tunicate Regrows as Three New Animals
Amanda Heidt | May 13, 2021 | 4 min read
While regeneration has long been the domain of colonial tunicates, a solitary species of sea squirt was able to regenerate into multiple, fully functional individuals within a month of being cut up.
Long-Lasting Wound Infections Linked to Microbes and Genetics
Lisa Winter | Sep 1, 2020 | 2 min read
Two gene variations might help explain why some people experience chronic wounds.
Luis Alvarez Aims to Heal Wounds with Tissue-Regenerating “Paint”
Shawna Williams | Jul 13, 2020 | 3 min read
The bioactive coating tethers restorative proteins to implanted tissues and fosters new growth, animal studies suggest.
Immunologist Wendy Havran Dies
Lisa Winter | Jan 28, 2020 | 3 min read
Havran described gamma-delta T cells’ direct function in epithelial repair.
Image of the Day: Life and Death
Carolyn Wilke | Mar 22, 2019 | 1 min read
When hair follicle stem cells lose their protein-based death cue, they take on a new role helping to repair wounds in skin.
Caught on Camera
The Scientist Staff | Dec 1, 2018 | 1 min read
Selected Images of the Day from the-scientist.com
Image of the Day: On the Mend
Sukanya Charuchandra | Sep 6, 2018 | 1 min read
Reprogrammed cells fix wounds in living mice.
Fat Cells Travel to Heal Wounds in Flies
Kerry Grens | Feb 27, 2018 | 2 min read
Previously considered immobile, these cells swoop in to seal epithelial holes and clean up cellular detritus.  
Skin “Remembers” Wounds, Heals Faster the Second Time Around
Katarina Zimmer | Jan 1, 2018 | 2 min read
After an initial wounding, genes needed for repair remain ready for action.
So You’ve Been Mistaken as a White Nationalist
Kerry Grens | Aug 17, 2017 | 2 min read
Biomedical engineer Kyle Quinn fends off a frenzied Internet mob after being wrongly identified as a Charlottesville protester.
Newly Discovered Emergency Responders to Liver Damage
Ashley P. Taylor | Aug 1, 2016 | 3 min read
Immune cells called macrophages from the peritoneal cavity of mice migrate to injured livers and aid in repair.
Straighten Out
Kate Yandell | Jan 1, 2015 | 3 min read
Forces from bidirectional growth plates mechanically realign broken bones in infant mice.
Human Skin Can “Smell” Odors
Jef Akst | Jul 10, 2014 | 2 min read
Olfactory receptors in the skin may help repair damaged tissue, a study shows.
The Wound Microbiome
Kerry Grens | Jun 23, 2014 | 1 min read
Determining which critters are present in an infected wound could aid in treatment, particularly of soldiers injured in combat.
Sticking Power
Kate Yandell | Jul 1, 2013 | 4 min read
An adhesive inspired by a parasitic worm could help better affix skin grafts in burn patients.
Worm Bandage
Kate Yandell | Jun 30, 2013 | 1 min read
Biomimicry yields a new type of patch that may help wounds heal faster.
Maggot Medicine
Beth Marie Mole | Dec 10, 2012 | 1 min read
The healing powers of maggots may lie in their secreted proteins, which restrain the human immune response.
Closing the Gap
Kerry Grens | Oct 1, 2012 | 2 min read
A new assay shows that cells use lamellipodia as their primary mechanism to seal up holes in epithelial tissue.
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