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Supplement: Did you know?
Supplement: Did you know?
Did you know? ARTICLE EXTRAS A Region Defined A Rich Life Science Cluster Greater Philadelphia's Big Pharmas A Robust Support Infrastructure Barbara Schilberg: Champion for the region Bridging the Gap Brenda Gavin: Making a venture capitalist Investment Momentum Building Update Those Resumes Creating Roots Ramping Up Tech Transfer
Supplement: A Region Defined
Supplement: A Region Defined
A Region Defined The Greater Philadelphia life science cluster is a powerhouse of human capital spread across a wide network of big pharmaceutical companies, research-intensive institutions, top-notch academia, emerging biotech giants, and a strong infrastructure of support services. This section highlights each component of the network, the region's commitment to commercialization, and the challenges its leaders are working hard to resolve. A Region Defined Did
Supplement: Covance: The Friendly Giant
Supplement: Covance: The Friendly Giant
Covance: The Friendly Giant By Kathryn Ward Louis Gutierrez ARTICLE EXTRAS A Region Defined A Robust Support Infrastructure The infrastructure ECRI Laureate Pharma Quest Pharmaceutical Immunicon Fox Chase Cancer Center Morgan, Lewis & Bockius Coriell Paragon Chemical InstaMed Covance is a goliath of a company, both in the Greater Philadelphia region and worldwide. Headquartered in Princeton, NJ, and with an office in
Supplement: A Rich Life Science Cluster
Supplement: A Rich Life Science Cluster
A Rich Life Science Cluster By Mike May This region is a powerhouse of human capital in a network of research institutions, academia, pharmaceuticals, biotechs, and industry-support services. RELATED ARTICLES A Region Defined Did You Know? Greater Philadelphia's Big Pharmas A Robust Support Infrastructure Barbara Schilberg: Champion for the region Bridging the Gap Brenda Gavin: Making a venture capitalist Investment Momentum Building Update Those
Supplement: Greater Philadelphia's Big Pharmas
Supplement: Greater Philadelphia's Big Pharmas
Greater Philadelphia's Big Pharmas By Mike May A wide range of large pharmaceutical companies make up a strong foundation for life science in the region. RELATED ARTICLES A Region Defined Did You Know? A Rich Life Science Cluster A Robust Support Infrastructure Barbara Schilberg: Champion for the region Bridging the Gap Brenda Gavin: Making a venture capitalist Investment Momentum Building Update Those Resumes Creating Roots Ramping Up Tech Tr
Supplement: Fox Chase Cancer Center
Supplement: Fox Chase Cancer Center
Fox Chase Cancer Center "I strongly believe that there will be a totally different way to treat cancer patients in the next 10 years," declared Michael V. Seiden, MD, PhD, shortly after he became president and CEO of Fox Chase Cancer Center in June 2007. "I think tumors will be removed and analyzed in a much more molecularly-based way. This is already being done at the research level, but in 10 years, therapies will be selected for people based on the molecula
Supplement: Immunicon: Advanced Anticancer Technology
Supplement: Immunicon: Advanced Anticancer Technology
Immunicon: Advanced Anticancer Technology By Kathryn Ward ARTICLE EXTRAS A Region Defined A Robust Support Infrastructure The infrastructure ECRI Laureate Pharma Quest Pharmaceutical Fox Chase Cancer Center Morgan, Lewis & Bockius Covance Coriell Paragon Chemical InstaMed Byron Hewett Fighting cancer is a mission at Immunicon. Founded in 1983 by a professor at Thomas Jefferson University, a leading Philadelphia
Supplement: Morgan, Lewis & Bockius Attorneys for Life Science
Supplement: Morgan, Lewis & Bockius Attorneys for Life Science
Morgan, Lewis & Bockius Attorneys for Life Science By Kathryn Ward Joanne SoslowCourtesy of Morgan, Lewis & Bockius ARTICLE EXTRAS A Region Defined A Robust Support Infrastructure The infrastructure ECRI Laureate Pharma Quest Pharmaceutical Immunicon Fox Chase Cancer Center Covance Coriell Paragon Chemical InstaMed Founded in Philadelphia in 1873, Morgan, Lewis & Bockius is one of the United States'
Slideshow: Monkeypox in the Congo
Slideshow: Monkeypox in the Congo
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Supplement: Fox Chase: Outfoxing Cancer
Supplement: Fox Chase: Outfoxing Cancer
Fox Chase: Outfoxing Cancer By Kathryn Ward ARTICLE EXTRAS A Region Defined A Robust Support Infrastructure The infrastructure ECRI Laureate Pharma Quest Pharmaceutical Immunicon Morgan, Lewis & Bockius Covance Coriell Paragon Chemical InstaMed Louis Weiner Like the Greater Philadelphia region itself, Fox Chase Cancer Center has a long and impressive history. Founded in 1904 in Philadelphia as the American Oncolo
Supplement: First State Innovation
Supplement: First State Innovation
First State Innovation By Mike May ARTICLE EXTRAS A Region Defined Bridging the Gap Ben Franklin Technology Partners Keystone Innovation Zones NJIT's Enterprise Development Center Rowan University's CIE The Science Center Although well-known companies such as DuPont and AstraZeneca call Delaware their home, the state has lacked a reputation as a high-tech area. Consequently, Delaware has not always attracted new life science companies. "It s
Supplement: Keystone Innovation Zones
Supplement: Keystone Innovation Zones
Keystone Innovation Zones By Mike May ARTICLE EXTRAS A Region Defined Bridging the Gap Ben Franklin Technology Partners First State Innovation NJIT's Enterprise Development Center Rowan University's CIE The Science Center Innovation comes from more than flashes of insight. A few years ago, Denise Polacek began experiencing hot flashes, which sparked the birth of an innovative solution for this widely encountered problem. "Far fewer women ar
Supplement: New Jersey Institute of Technology's Enterprise Development Center
Supplement: New Jersey Institute of Technology's Enterprise Development Center
New Jersey Institute of Technology's Enterprise Development Center By Mike May ARTICLE EXTRAS A Region Defined Bridging the Gap Ben Franklin Technology Partners First State Innovation Keystone Innovation Zones Rowan University's CIE The Science Center Working from his basement, Miguel Perez struggled to start Morpholytics. He wanted to connect companies with analytical problems with people who could solve them. To get Morpholytics moving,
Two paths for a preadipocyte
Two paths for a preadipocyte
Two paths for a preadipocyte By Bruce Spiegelman Click to view infographic PDF  Related Articles The Skinny Fat Energy-burning baby fat
Supplement: Center for Innovation & Entrepreneurship, Rowan University
Supplement: Center for Innovation & Entrepreneurship, Rowan University
Center for Innovation & Entrepreneurship, Rowan University By Mike May ARTICLE EXTRAS A Region Defined Bridging the Gap Ben Franklin Technology Partners First State Innovation Keystone Innovation Zones NJIT's Enterprise Development Center The Science Center For Thomas Pote, massaging his clients makes up more than a business tactic. At the age of 19, he studied massage at the Lourdes Institute of Wholistic Studies in Collingswood, NJ. At
Supplement: The University City Science Center
Supplement: The University City Science Center
The University City Science Center By Mike May ARTICLE EXTRAS A Region Defined Bridging the Gap Ben Franklin Technology Partners First State Innovation Keystone Innovation Zones NJIT's Enterprise Development Center Rowan University's CIE In 1963 the nonprofit University City Science Center took over four blocks, between 34th and 38th Streets along Market Street, in Philadelphia. Dean Lewis, the center's interim president and C
Supplement: Brenda Gavin
Supplement: Brenda Gavin
Brenda Gavin By Karen Pallarito The making of a venture capitalist. RELATED ARTICLES A Region Defined Did You Know? A Rich Life Science Cluster Greater Philadelphia's Big Pharmas A Robust Support Infrastructure Barbara Schilberg: Champion for the region Bridging the Gap Investment Momentum Building Update Those Resumes Creating Roots Ramping Up Tech Transfer DUSTIN FENSTERMACHER / WONDERFUL MACHINE Long before Brenda Gavin began i
Supplement: Investment Momentum Building
Supplement: Investment Momentum Building
1 Chris Cashman, president and CEO of Protez Pharmaceuticals, a Malvern, Pennsylvania, maker of new antibiotics to fight drug-resistance, recalls the 2001 to 2002 "washout period," when the market for biotech and many small-capital companies fell apart. "Raising money was very difficult. Lots of companies failed," he says. For Cashman and other biotech entrepreneurs, the recovery began with Pennsylvania's move in 2001 to use its tobacco settlement funds to create capital for life scie
Compromising Coral Immunity
Compromising Coral Immunity
Compromising Coral Immunity Increasing oceanic temperatures are driving epidemics of coral disease. By Edyta Zielinska Related Articles: Climate change focus Climate change and the biosphere A sensitive reaction Shielding from the storm Modeling with model organisms Compromising coral immunity Slideshow: Climate change and corals The hole is disease modeling Hot Papers: Climate change and frog deaths In the summer of 1983, hundreds of square meters of grac
The Hole in Disease Modeling
The Hole in Disease Modeling
The Hole in Disease Modeling Why don't most studies of climate change include molecular methods? By Jonathan Scheff Vibrio parahaemolyticus, a common scourge in India, recently found in the warming ocean waters of Alaska. Related Articles: 1 "This was probably the most convincing evidence to date of the impact of climate change on pathogen outbreaks in North America," says McLaughlin. Average daily marine temperatures in the sound had been rising steadily, the
Supplement: Ramping Up Tech transfer
Supplement: Ramping Up Tech transfer
1 The report, conceived by the venture capital working group of the region's CEO Council for Growth, compares the Greater Philadelphia area to peer regions with strong life science industries and suggests strategies for advancing the region's commercialization potential. With so many excellent universities and research institutes in the area, more innovations should be ending up in the hands of entrepreneurs who can develop them into products, the report finds. In response, business leader
Slideshow: A Waiting Trial
Slideshow: A Waiting Trial
var FO = { movie:"http://www.the-scientist.com/supplementary/flash/54072/54072.swf", width:"520", height:"580", majorversion:"8", build:"0", xi:"true"}; UFO.create(FO, "ufoDemo"); Slideshow: A Waiting Trial In October, Deputy Editor Ivan Oransky traveled to Fargo, North Dakota, to interview Doug Bergman in the hospital. Bergman had developed leukemia a little more than a year after taking part in a clinical trial of stem cells to repair his heart. (For a st
A Waiting Trial
A Waiting Trial
A Waiting Trial In the summer of 2006, Doug Bergman had a needle plunged into his heart 10 times for science. Now he has leukemia. By Ivan Oransky Photographs by John Borge Related Articles: Trial of the Heart Scientist to Watch: Amy Wagers - Setting the record straight Slideshow: A Waiting Trial When I knock on the door of room 733 of the MeritCare Roger Maris Cancer Center in Fargo, ND, Doug Bergman is sitting up in his bed. He's been expecting me, but it's n
Supplement: Successful Strategies
Supplement: Successful Strategies
Successful Strategies In this section you will meet some of the region's most successful entrepreneurs who discuss how their companies first stayed alive, then flourished over time. The region is well-known for its collaborative spirit, but collaboration is also a strategic move that has brought forth innovative technologies in Greater Philadelphia. One such long-term partnership is on its way to a treatment for Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. Margaret F
Supplement: Margaret Foti
Supplement: Margaret Foti
Margaret Foti By Anne Harding Devoting her life to cancer research DUSTIN FENSTERMACHER / WONDERFUL MACHINE RELATED ARTICLES Successful Strategies The Launch and the Exit Entrepreneurs Boldly Break New Ground Mark Tykocinski: Open doors lead a scientist to his calling Shire Pharmaceuticals: A Study in Exponential Growth Many Happy Returns: Cephalon celebrates its 20th year Creative Collaboration When Margaret Foti became the first chief
Supplement: The Launch and the Exit
Supplement: The Launch and the Exit
THE LAUNCH AND THE EXIT By Susan Brown There's an art to creating - and selling - a life science company. Pick an invention that solves a problem and then think the enterprise through to the end so you will attract the needed investors to launch a life science company. That is the advice of Gary Kurtzman who has helped to start dozens of companies over the past 16 years. Kurtzman picks winning ventures for a living as vice president for the life sciences group
Supplement: Mark Tykocinski
Supplement: Mark Tykocinski
Mark Tykocinski By Karen Pallarito Open doors lead a scientist to his calling. RELATED ARTICLES Successful Strategies Margaret Foti: Devoted to cancer research The Launch and the Exit Entrepreneurs Boldly Break New Ground Shire Pharmaceuticals: A Study in Exponential Growth Many Happy Returns: Cephalon celebrates its 20th year Creative Collaboration DUSTIN FENSTERMACHER / WONDERFUL MACHINE In the summer of 1971, Yale undergraduate Mar
Supplement: Shire Pharmaceuticals: A Study in Exponential Growth
Supplement: Shire Pharmaceuticals: A Study in Exponential Growth
Shire Pharmaceuticals: A Study in Exponential Growth By Charles Q. Choi RELATED ARTICLES Successful Strategies Margaret Foti: Devoted to cancer research The Launch and the Exit Entrepreneurs Boldly Break New Ground Mark Tykocinski: Open doors lead a scientist to his calling Many Happy Returns: Cephalon celebrates its 20th year Creative Collaboration It's not every company that can go from $7 million in revenues to more than $1.7 billion
Supplement: Turning Tobacco into Therapies
Supplement: Turning Tobacco into Therapies
Turning Tobacco into Therapies By Jeffrey M. Perkel RELATED ARTICLES Innovative Technology Daniel Skovronsky: Scientist and leader Biofuel: The Potential Magic Bullet Britton Chance: Still searching for answers Art Caplan: Penn's renowned ethicist Technology Roundup The Delaware Technology Park in Newark just may be the site of the next revolution. There, in a two-story building aptly named "9 Innovation Way," the Fraunhofer USA Center for Mo
Supplement: Biofuel: The Potential Magic Bullet
Supplement: Biofuel: The Potential Magic Bullet
Biofuel: The Potential Magic Bullet By Tabitha M. Powledge RELATED ARTICLES Innovative Technology Daniel Skovronsky: Scientist and leader Turning Tobacco into Therapies Britton Chance: Still searching for answers Art Caplan: Penn's renowned ethicist Technology Roundup DuPont's experimental station in Wilmington, Del., sprawls over more than 150 acres, one of the largest nonacademic research campuses in the world. Its roots lie in the 19th c
Supplement: Britton Chance
Supplement: Britton Chance
Britton Chance By Pamela Gannon Still searching for answers, after all these years. RELATED ARTICLES Innovative Technology Daniel Skovronsky: Scientist and leader Turning Tobacco into Therapies Biofuel: The Potential Magic Bullet Art Caplan: Penn's renowned ethicist Technology Roundup © Chaofei Deng and Lei Chang -- The Palace Wedding Dress Photo, Wuhan, China Biochemist, biophysicist, inventor, educator, patriot, Olympian - all
Supplement: Art Caplan
Supplement: Art Caplan
Art Caplan By Karen Pallarito A conversation with Penn's renowned ethicist. RELATED ARTICLES Innovative Technology Daniel Skovronsky: Scientist and leader Turning Tobacco into Therapies Biofuel: The Potential Magic Bullet Britton Chance: Still searching for answers Technology Roundup DUSTIN FENSTERMACHER / WONDERFUL MACHINE As a Columbia University philosophy student in the 1970s, Arthur Caplan listened to ongoing discussions about the ethics of
Supplement: Technology Roundup
Supplement: Technology Roundup
Technology Roundup By Jack Lucentini One of the Greater Philadelphia region's strengths is its robust science and technology research. This sampling of efforts underway at the area's institutions reveals projects ranging from basic science to cutting-edge technologies in clinical development. Many of the products under development represent part of a growing trend: a shift toward personalized medicine. Innovative Technology Greater Philadelphia Innovation -->
Supplement: Matching the Drug to the Tumor
Supplement: Matching the Drug to the Tumor
Matching the Drug to the Tumor By Jack Lucentini ARTICLE EXTRAS Innovative Technology Technology Roundup Rutgers-Camden Institute Neuronetics Temple University Absorption Systems University of Pennsylvania Tengion Kimmel Cancer Center Orphagenix BioNanomatrix When scientists at Bristol-Myers Squibb Research Institute in Princeton, NJ, recently studied whether a new drug could fight colorectal cancer, they started with a
Supplement: Lab-on-a-chip Technology Goes Nano
Supplement: Lab-on-a-chip Technology Goes Nano
Lab-on-a-chip Technology Goes Nano By Jack Lucentini ARTICLE EXTRAS Innovative Technology Technology Roundup Greater Philadelphia Innovation --> Bristol Myers-Squibb Rutgers-Camden Institute Neuronetics Temple University Absorption Systems University of Pennsylvania Tengion Kimmel Cancer Center Orphagenix Science is moving from an age in which researchers can sequence genomes, to one in which doctors can use them in deve

Contributors

Contributors
Contributors
F. Stuart Chapin III, known as Terry, has been a professor of ecology at the University of Alaska Fairbanks since 1973. He studies the effects of changes in climate and wildfire on Alaskan ecology, with a particular focus on developing sustainable ecosystems and human communities. In this issue, Chapin introduces a five-part feature on the effects of climate change on the biosphere. "Scientific assessments now clearly demonstrate the ecological and societal consequences of huma

Editorial

Am I Sexist?
Am I Sexist?
Here's how The Scientist will take action to support women in science.

Mail

Mail
Mail
Manna from Hell "Manna from Hell"1 is the sort of article that I would love to see more of in the future. What makes it so fascinating? The human disease focus for sure, but also the clear portrayal of how a set of anecdotal observations turned into science - often a long and arduous journey, involving contributions from around the world. John Collins Technical UniversityBraunschweig, Germany tojohncollins@t-online.de Whenever I see the word Aristoloch

Notebook

Trash to treasure
Trash to treasure
Trash to treasure
As Anna Dhody tells it, sometime in 2000 or 2001 she and her supervisor Steven LeBlanc, director of collections at Harvard's Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, were discussing ways to obtain ancient DNA from secondary archeological finds over lunch. Recalling her training as a forensic anthropologist, Dhody, now curator of the Mütter Museum of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, mentioned how things like cigarette butts or discarded coffee cups from crime scenes
Call of the squash
Call of the squash
Lacayote squash Credit: Courtesy of Thomas Andres" />Lacayote squash Credit: Courtesy of Thomas Andres Last fall, Thomas Andres was wandering around New York City's Chinatown when he happened upon the subject of his doctoral dissertation: the lacayote, Cucurbita ficifolia, a South American squash rarely sold in the United States. He was happy to shell out $6 for the mottled green gourd. Twenty-five years ago, he had dreamed of discovering its wild ancestor on some scrubby hillside in
The virus hunter
The virus hunter
Epidemiologist Anne Rimoin (left) investigates a case of monkeypox in Lomela, Congo. The patient eventually died from monkeypox-related complications. Credit: © Lynn Johnson / National Geographic" />Epidemiologist Anne Rimoin (left) investigates a case of monkeypox in Lomela, Congo. The patient eventually died from monkeypox-related complications. Credit: © Lynn Johnson / National Geographic For University of California, Los Angeles, epidemiologist Anne Rimoin, 2007 was a ro
Fortifying food
Fortifying food
Two images of the nisin PLA polymer, outer surface (left) and cross-sectional (right) views. Nisin is evenly distributed, ensuring its slow but continuous release. Credit: Courtesy of Tony Jin" />Two images of the nisin PLA polymer, outer surface (left) and cross-sectional (right) views. Nisin is evenly distributed, ensuring its slow but continuous release. Credit: Courtesy of Tony Jin Food scientist Tony Jin's dissertation had something most don't: A picture of a Jack in the Box rest

Opinion

Is the US Party Over?
Is the US Party Over?
The country's fading dominance in life sciences research spells trouble for the whole world.

Citation Classic

50 Years Ago in Immunofluorescence
50 Years Ago in Immunofluorescence
In a Citation Classic, a virologist recalls developing a green dye that is now a staple in immunofluorescence

Scientist To Watch

Amy Wagers: Setting the record straight
Amy Wagers: Setting the record straight
Credit: © Leah Fasten Photography" /> Credit: © Leah Fasten Photography As a postdoc in Irving Weissman's laboratory at Stanford University, Amy Wagers earned a reputation for putting other people's findings to the test. In 2002 Wagers published evidence contrary to claims that bone marrow-derived stem cells could transdifferentiate into brain, muscle, and other tissues.1 In 2004, she found that hematopoietic stem cells could not repair damaged myocardium,2 despite other ev

Lab Tools

Source and sink
Source and sink
Three primary human neutrophils within a microfluidic channel responding to a gradient of Interleukin-8 (labeled with a green fluorophore) by chemotaxing to a higher concentration (left). Panels are frames from a movie, taken 10 minutes apart. Credit: Courtesy of Mary Lokuta / University of Wisconsin, Madison" />Three primary human neutrophils within a microfluidic channel responding to a gradient of Interleukin-8 (labeled with a green fluorophore) by chemotaxing to a higher concentration (left)
Let it flow
Let it flow
Innovative solutions with small-scale microfluidics.
Membrane interface
Membrane interface
Phase contrast image of human microvascular epithelial cells grown in a single layer microfluidic cell culture chip under constant perfusion. Credit: Courtesy of Divya Nalayanda and Fizan Abdullah / Johns Hopkins Children's Center, Baltimore, Md." />Phase contrast image of human microvascular epithelial cells grown in a single layer microfluidic cell culture chip under constant perfusion. Credit: Courtesy of Divya Nalayanda and Fizan Abdullah / Johns Hopkins Children's Center, Baltimore, Md.
Conservation max
Conservation max
A confocal image of endothelial cells cultured in one of the microcapillaries of the biochip. Credit: Cellix Ltd." />A confocal image of endothelial cells cultured in one of the microcapillaries of the biochip. Credit: Cellix Ltd. User: Garry Walsh, University of Aberdeen School of Medicine, Scotland. Project: Examining adhesion of eosinophils under conditions of blood flow in the lungs. Problem: Eosinophils are relatively rare and difficult to

Pulse Oximeter

Help women stay in science
Help women stay in science
A female scientist gives her top 10 list for men, and our readers respond with tips of their own.