Uncategorized

Supplement: Living with Rheumatoid Arthritis
Supplement: Living with Rheumatoid Arthritis
Living with Rheumatoid Arthritis By Meredith Small © F. Hoffmann-La Roche, Ltd. Thirteen years ago, when Steve Robson was 35 years old, he casually tried out a jackhammer while working on a jobsite in Dublin, Ireland. The next morning, Robson's left hand wouldn't work. Everyone assumed that the jackhammer was to blame, and that his hand would soon be fine. It wasn't. In fact, it wasn't the jackhammer a
Supplement: Fitting Lupus into Life
Supplement: Fitting Lupus into Life
Fitting Lupus into Life By Juhi Yajnik © Leah Fasten Photography In Westborough, Mass., some people find it strange that 45-year-old Marianne Crowley gardens at night. Being misunderstood, though, is nothing new to her. For most of her twenties, Crowley had symptoms that felt like severe arthritis. The muscles in her arms and hands atrophied and felt as though they were being pricked with needl
Supplement: More Than Skin Deep
Supplement: More Than Skin Deep
More Than Skin Deep By Kirsten Weir Courtesy of Scott Steele Scott Steele, the 32-year-old managing director of the Classical Chinese Garden in Portland, Oregon, still remembers a trip to a hair salon as a teenager. The hairdresser took one look at the psoriasis outbreak on his scalp and forehead and actually backed away. Even after Steele explained that it wasn't contagious, the woman refused to cu
Supplement: Crash Course with Rheumatoid Arthritis
Supplement: Crash Course with Rheumatoid Arthritis
Crash Course with Rheumatoid Arthritis By Juhi Yajnik © Courtesy of the Daily Press In 1987, Beverly Williams began a battle with rheumatoid arthritis. Williams was a 22-year-old newspaper reporter, fresh out of Virginia Tech, when her hands started to hurt. Her doctor sent her to a specialist who diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis. She took the news lightly. "But if I knew then, what I know now," she says
Supplement: The Trials of Keeping Track
Supplement: The Trials of Keeping Track
1 on the epidemiology of autoimmune diseases, perhaps the most detailed publication on the topic so far. That report shows that in the more common conditions, such as MS, the imbalance tilts so that affected patients are roughly two-thirds female. "In some diseases, however, the degree of disproportion is very extreme," Cooper says. For example, at least 85% of patients with thyroiditis, systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and Sjögren disease are female. In data from the Cent
Supplement: Families in Crisis
Supplement: Families in Crisis
Families in Crisis Stanley M. Finger The impact of an autoimmune disease is felt by more than just the patient. One of the myths about autoimmune disease is that it has little socioeconomic impact. Nothing could be further from the truth. Autoimmune diseases as a whole afflict many people. In 2005, the National Institutes of Health estimated that as many as 24 million Americans have one or more a
Green Lab: List of resources
Green Lab: List of resources
Green Lab: Resources ARTICLE EXTRAS Interactive Q&A:   Need advice on making your lab green? Can Labs Go Green? Anatomy of a Green Lab Green lab slideshow List of resources If you are interested in finding out more about the resources needed to create a more environmentally friendly lab, the following list of websites should provide a good starting point. American Society of Heating, Refrigera
Supplement: The Causes
Supplement: The Causes
The Causes What causes autoimmune disease? Jeff Bluestone of the University of California, San Francisco - one of the world's leading authorities on the mechanisms behind autoimmunity - talks us through the pathways that trigger and fuel the internal battle to control the immune system. Thomas Dörner of the Charite University Hospital Berlin (see article here) and Yoshiyuki Ohsugi of Chugai Pharma
Audio Slideshow: The Parasites of Beaver Pond
Audio Slideshow: The Parasites of Beaver Pond
Audio Slideshow: The Parasites of Beaver Pond Tom Raffel of Penn State's Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics takes writer Brendan Borrell on a trip to Beaver Pond where the parasites are jumping. var FO = { movie:"http://images.the-scientist.com/supplementary/flash/53152/cidd.swf", width:"550", height:"511", majorversion:"8", build:"0", xi:"true"}; UFO.create(FO, "ufoDemo"); Please download the Adobe Flash Player to view this content:
Supplement: A Balanced Attack
Supplement: A Balanced Attack
1 Consequently, immunologists adjusted their focus from trying to determine why autoreactive cells escape deletion to exploring how the immune system maintains a homeostatic balance and why it sometimes fails. It seems clear that understanding this balance - a peaceful coexistence of protective immunity without self-destructing - will reveal how the immune system really works and how autoimmunity is triggered. The challenge resides in the comple
A New Dynamic
A New Dynamic
A New Dynamic With an eye toward host-pathogen interactions, can a Penn State center predict and prevent the next pandemic? By Brendan Borrell ARTICLE EXTRAS 1 "Our vision really is to have a systems approach to disease," says Hudson. "Issues that go from intracellular interactions between viruses and cells right the way through to pandemics, something we call the protein-to-pandemic link." Pathogens don't just interact, they evol
Evolving Epidemiology
Evolving Epidemiology
Evolving Epidemiology ARTICLE EXTRAS 1 Epidemic patterns are largely determined by the time course of an infection, whether it's measured in days, weeks, or years. Phylogenetic patterns result from an interaction between natural selection mediated by the immune system (and/or drug treatments) and random epidemiological processes. Here's how some common pandemics play out. Measles is a highly conta
Supplement: Too Much to Untangle
Supplement: Too Much to Untangle
Too Much to Untangle By Michael Szpir Genes and the environment both contribute to autoimmune diseases, and future advances could come from studying these factors in combination. ARTICLE EXTRAS Ultraviolet Light and Lupus Drugs, Diet, and Lupus Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis Iodine and Autoimmune Thyroid Disease Ultraviolet Light and Dermatomyositis Why anyone develops an autoimmune disease is
To Build a Killing Machine
To Build a Killing Machine
To Build a Killing Machine David Kirn can't turn his back on a century-old quest to pit oncolytic viruses against tumors. By Andrew Holtz ARTICLE EXTRAS 1 Reports like this prompted many investigators in the middle of the last century to apply viral infections to tumors, but the available viruses, either taken from the wild or adapted from contemporary vaccines, were blunt instruments. Advances in bioengineering have provided the means t
A selected list of oncolytic viruses in clinical trials
A selected list of oncolytic viruses in clinical trials
A selected list of oncolytic viruses in clinical trialsClick on the company or institution name for more information on the clinical trials Virus Selective targeting method Indications Human trial status Companies/Institutions (candidate) Adenovirus E1B deletion restricts replication to cells with abberant mRNA transport Head and neck tumors Phase III Sunway Biotech of China (H101) Head and neck tumors Phase III (canceled) Onyx (O15)
Supplement: Ultraviolet Light and Lupus
Supplement: Ultraviolet Light and Lupus
Ultraviolet Light and Lupus ARTICLE EXTRAS Too Much to Untangle Drugs, Diet, and Lupus Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis Iodine and Autoimmune Thyroid Disease Ultraviolet Light and Dermatomyositis Sunlight can worsen rashes and even trigger a flare-up of the disease in some people with lupus. It is well known that sun-sensitive lupus patients carry certain variants of the HLA genes, but those are
Supplement: Drugs, Diet, and Lupus
Supplement: Drugs, Diet, and Lupus
Drugs, Diet, and Lupus ARTICLE EXTRAS Too Much to Untangle Ultraviolet Light and Lupus Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis Iodine and Autoimmune Thyroid Disease Ultraviolet Light and Dermatomyositis One of the best examples of a gene-environment interaction in autoimmunity involves instances in which certain drugs produce a lupus-like syndrome in genetically susceptible individuals. It turns out
Supplement: Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis
Supplement: Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis
Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis ARTICLE EXTRAS Too Much to Untangle Ultraviolet Light and Lupus Drugs, Diet, and Lupus Iodine and Autoimmune Thyroid Disease Ultraviolet Light and Dermatomyositis Recently, Lars Klareskog at the Karolinska Institute and his colleagues described a strong gene-environment interaction in a subset of people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (L. Klareskog et al., "Genes,
Supplement: Iodine and Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases
Supplement: Iodine and Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases
Iodine and Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases ARTICLE EXTRAS Too Much to Untangle Ultraviolet Light and Lupus Drugs, Diet, and Lupus Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis Ultraviolet Light and Dermatomyositis A number of clinical and epidemiological studies suggest that the incidence of autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs), such as Hashimoto thyroiditis and Graves disease, goes up as dietary iodine increas
Supplement: Ultraviolet Light and Dermatomyositis
Supplement: Ultraviolet Light and Dermatomyositis
Ultraviolet Light and Dermatomyositis ARTICLE EXTRAS Too Much to Untangle Ultraviolet Light and Lupus Drugs, Diet, and Lupus Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis Iodine and Autoimmune Thyroid Disease Dermatomyositis is a connective-tissue disease that is characterized by inflammation of the skin and the muscles. Exposure to sunlight, either occupationally or recreationally, is anecdotally associa
The Importance of Imaging
The Importance of Imaging
The Importance of Imaging ARTICLE EXTRAS To Build a Killing Machine A selected list of oncolytic viruses in clinical trials Moments after being injected with a tagged virus, the entire body of a mouse glows under specialized cameras designed to pick up light emanating from deep beneath the skin. Over time the light becomes concentrated to a few key spots. These are the tumors where the virus, a strain of vaccinia, is replicating
The Little Company That Can
The Little Company That Can
The Little Company That Can By Bob Grant Photo by Catherine Ledner ARTICLE EXTRAS Best Places to Work 2007 Sandoz stands out Top 30 Companies Top Large Companies Top Small Companies Most Important Factors Top Companies on the Most Important Factors Categories Best Places to Work: Survey Findings PDF Amylin Pharmaceuticals, a 20-year-old biopharmaceutical company based in San Diego, broke into ou
Sandoz stands out
Sandoz stands out
Sandoz stands out By Andrea Gawrylewski Courtesty of Sandoz ARTICLE EXTRAS The Little Company That Can Best Places to Work 2007 Top 30 Companies Top Large Companies Top Small Companies Most Important Factors Top Companies on the Most Important Factors Categories Best Places to Work: Survey Findings PDF Having never ranked in the history of our Best Places to Work in Industry survey, Sandoz debut
Top Large Companies
Top Large Companies
Best Places to Work in Industry 2007: Top Large Companies Use the interactive chart below to sort the top ranked institutions by category. Resize the rows or scroll within the chart to view category. Click here to view the printable PDF. // create ActiveWidgets data model - CSV text table var table = new AW.CSV.Table; // provide data URL - plain text comma-separated file table.setURL("/supplementary/csv/53161/topLarge.csv"); // start asyncronous data retrieval
Top Small Companies
Top Small Companies
Best Places to Work in Industry 2007: Top Small Companies Use the interactive chart below to sort the top ranked institutions by category. Resize the rows or scroll within the chart to view category. Click here to view the printable PDF. // create ActiveWidgets data model - CSV text table var table = new AW.CSV.Table; // provide data URL - plain text comma-separated file table.setURL("/supplementary/csv/53161/topSmall.csv"); // start asyncronous data retrieval
Supplement: Top Autoimmune Diseases
Supplement: Top Autoimmune Diseases
Top Autoimmune Diseases DISEASE AGE OF ONSET IMPACTED TISSUES SYMPTOMS MECHANISM CURRENT TREATMENT Addison's disease Children or young adults Adrenal glands Fatigue Low blood pressure Muscle weakness Sometimes darkening of the skin Weight loss Inadequate production of cortisol and, sometimes, aldosterone Hormone replacement for cortisol and, if needed, aldosterone Allergic asthma Teenage years Lungs Constricted ai
Best Places to Work in Industry, 2007 Survey Methodology
Best Places to Work in Industry, 2007 Survey Methodology
Best Places to Work in Industry, 2007 Survey Methodology Related Articles Best Places to Work in Industry 2007 The Little Company That Can Sandoz stands out Top 30 Companies Top Large Companies Top Small Companies Most Important Factors Top Companies on the Most Important Factors Categories Best Places to Work: Survey Findings PDF Survey Methodology Survey Form: A web-based survey was posted on The Scientist web site from January February 8 to
Top Companies on the Most Important Factors Categories
Top Companies on the Most Important Factors Categories
Best Places to Work in Industry 2007: Top Companies on the Most Important Factors Categories Use the interactive chart below to sort the top ranked institutions by category. Resize the rows or scroll within the chart to view category. Click here to view the printable PDF. // create ActiveWidgets data model - CSV text table var table = new AW.CSV.Table; // provide data URL - plain text comma-separated file table.setURL("/supplementary/csv/53161/topCoFactors.csv");
Most Important Factors
Most Important Factors
Best Places to Work in Industry 2007: Most Important Factors Use the interactive chart below to sort the top ranked institutions by category. Resize the rows or scroll within the chart to view category. Click here to view the printable PDF. // create ActiveWidgets data model - CSV text table var table = new AW.CSV.Table; // provide data URL - plain text comma-separated file table.setURL("/supplementary/csv/53161/mostImpFactors.csv"); // start asyncronous data re
Making Conservation Make Sense
Making Conservation Make Sense
Making Conservation Make Sense If it weren't for hurricanes, Les Kaufman might be studying something completely different today. By Karen Hopkin Jason Varney | VarneyPhoto.com Les Kaufman claims his interest in science might have begun in utero. "I remember at age 3, I got a book about the moon," he says. "At about 4, my father started bringing home herpetiles: frogs and turtles and things f
Supplement: Historical Highlights in Therapies
Supplement: Historical Highlights in Therapies
Historical Highlights in Therapies Autoimmune diseases stretch far back into the history of humans. Related illnesses even exist in nonhuman primates, such as the baboon model of Chaga's disease. Treatments for human autoimmune diseases have also been around for ages, or at least centuries. In the late 1600s, physicians treated RA with Peruvian bark, which contains quinine. A century later, physician
Supplement: Manipulating the Mechanisms
Supplement: Manipulating the Mechanisms
Manipulating the Mechanisms By Mike May Andrew C. Chan, MD, PhD, vice president of research immunology and antibody engineering at Genetech, discusses the future of research on autoimmunity, and how it could lead to more precise treatments. In the pharmaceutical industry in general, what therapies look particularly promising? There is a plethora of different kinds of mechanisms that are being pursue
Supplement: Moving from Prediction to Prevention
Supplement: Moving from Prediction to Prevention
Moving from Prediction to Prevention By Noel R. Rose Preventing autoimmune diseases is still a long way off, but it's a goal worth pursuing. © Bill McAllen Photography For me, the dream began in the early 1960s. As a medical student, I was helping with the care of a 16-year-old girl who had classical Hashimoto thyroiditis, a disease that more commonly occurs among middle-aged women. I guessed that this
Supplement: Organizations for Autoimmune Diseases
Supplement: Organizations for Autoimmune Diseases
Organizations for Autoimmune DiseasesThis sampling of international associations, foundations, and societies focused on various autoimmune diseases reveals the group efforts that benefit patients and researchers. Although many other organizations exist, the ones listed here provide informative Web sites with frequent updates. American Autoimmune Related Diseases Associationwww.aarda.org AARDA pursues the eradication of autoimmune diseases, as well as the alleviation
Life Science Industry Awards 2007
Life Science Industry Awards 2007
Life Science Industry Awards 2007 Saluting the winners: Customization, value, and customer service is the name of the game. By Andrea Gawrylewski, Bob Grant, and Manasee Wagh Although biomedical companies in search of new drugs often seem to grab all the headlines, anyone working in bioscience research and drug development knows that none of their advances would be possible without the life science industry that creates the rea

Contributors

Contributors
Contributors
Andrew Holtz, author of House, MD, spent 17 years at CNN, during 10 of which he covered medicine. He holds a masters degree in public health from Portland State University and writes a regular column for Oncology Times. On page 48, he reports on scientists who are trying to use viruses to treat cancer. ?The story is an interesting intersection of business and science,? say Holtz. ?Companies and academics are now trying to show that oncovirus can co

Editorial

End the Censorship of Science
End the Censorship of Science
Journals should make confidential full manuscript files available.

Mail

Mail
Mail
What we really need is for people to be healthy and productive for a greater portion of their lifespan. Re-engineering humans Re: ?What if humans were designed to last??1 Except in those areas of the world where food shortages, war and disease are major threats, most people can now expect to live longer than their grandparents did. Those of us fortunate enough to be living in the wealthier parts of

Notebook

The Agenda
The Agenda
LINNAEUS TERCENTENNIAL>> Swedish naturalist Carl Linnaeus would have turned 300 this month. Sweden is hosting a number of celebrations, including a Linnean garden at the Chelsea Garden Show, a Festival of Love, and bike rides through Swedish regions that inspired the Father of Taxonomy. Pick your favorite event at www.linnaeus2007.se/. TREE SPREE>> China is planting a 2,800-mile for
Year of the Panda
Year of the Panda
Related Articles Slideshow: On the panda trail On a March afternoon, there are so many pandas in the ?kindergarten pen? at Wolong Nature Reserve in China?s Sichuan Province, it?s hard to keep track of their antics. One is attempting a handstand while three others are playing king of the hill. These carefree cubs ? a record 19 from Wolong?s 2006 breeding season ? are part of the dramatic comeback for a symbol of conservation: the giant panda. The toddlers may one day follow Xiangxi
For love or oil
For love or oil
Credit: Courtesy of Linda Snook" /> Credit: Courtesy of Linda Snook On some workdays, Milton S. Love happily sinks to the bottom of the sea in a contraption the size of a telephone booth turned on its side. With only a clammy mat to lie on, for a break he gets to sit upright while trying not to bump his head on the three-foot high ceiling. Through a tiny hole, Milton spends a couple of blissful hours counting fish, speaking aloud the names and sizes he sees as a video camera rolls. I

Opinion

How to Boost Agricultural Research
How to Boost Agricultural Research
US land-grant universities need a radical rethink of their priorities.

Column

A Robot Code of Ethics
A Robot Code of Ethics
Do unto humans, as you would have them do unto you.

Papers To Watch

Papers to watch
Papers to watch
Credit: Courtesy of The International Union of Crystallography" /> Credit: Courtesy of The International Union of Crystallography S.N. Willis et al., ?Apoptosis initiated when BH3 ligands engage multiple Bcl-2 homologs, not Bax or Bak,? Science, 315:856?9, Feb. 9, 2007. The authors leverage knockout mice lacking BH3-only ?activators? to examine how the Bcl2 protein family cont
Crystal structure made easy
Crystal structure made easy
Credit: Courtesy of the International Union of Crystallography" /> Credit: Courtesy of the International Union of Crystallography Crystallizing proteins is a daunting task. Last year Alexander McPherson of the University of California, Irvine, and colleagues proposed a novel strategy to develop crystals quickly by including high concentrations of small molecules to the so-called mother liquors. They analyzed data on the crystallization of 81 different protein cultur
Two-color nanoscopy
Two-color nanoscopy
Stefan Hell and researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Germany detail an approach to microscopy that achieves a resolution of half the wavelength of light.

Scientist To Watch

Amy Kiger: A Place on the Edge
Amy Kiger: A Place on the Edge
Credit: © Frank Rogozienski Photography" /> Credit: © Frank Rogozienski Photography Amy Kiger admits to a healthy dose of yeast envy from time to time. In her tidy, two-year-old lab at the University of California, San Diego, she picks up a thin tube of Drosophila to explain how she?s using the flies to investigate membrane-mediated events that guide cell shape. Yeast genetics may be faster, easier, and better worked out, but for Kiger one of the most exci

Lab Tools

Antibodies Go Recombinant
Antibodies Go Recombinant
Tips and resources for choosing the right antibody development program.

BioBusiness

Life on the Fast Track
Life on the Fast Track
Former AmpliMed CEO Rob Ashley is as quick on the race track as he is in the fast-paced world of drug development.