SARS-CoV-2 Can Infect Human Brain Organoids
SARS-CoV-2 Can Infect Human Brain Organoids
The results are a proof-of-concept that the novel coronavirus can replicate in neurons, but it’s too soon to say whether this occurs in people with COVID-19.
SARS-CoV-2 Can Infect Human Brain Organoids
SARS-CoV-2 Can Infect Human Brain Organoids

The results are a proof-of-concept that the novel coronavirus can replicate in neurons, but it’s too soon to say whether this occurs in people with COVID-19.

The results are a proof-of-concept that the novel coronavirus can replicate in neurons, but it’s too soon to say whether this occurs in people with COVID-19.

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SARS-CoV-2 Spike Protein Shares Sequence with a Human Protein
SARS-CoV-2 Spike Protein Shares Sequence with a Human Protein
Abby Olena | Jun 1, 2020
Eight amino acids are identical to part of the human epithelial sodium channel, leading researchers to suspect the virus might interfere with the channel’s function.
Receptors for SARS-CoV-2 Present in Wide Variety of Human Cells
Receptors for SARS-CoV-2 Present in Wide Variety of Human Cells
Chris Baraniuk | Apr 29, 2020
Analyses from single-cell sequencing datasets support the idea that COVID-19 is not just a respiratory disease but an illness that can affect multiple organs.
Scientists Scan for Weaknesses in the SARS-CoV-2 Spike Protein
Scientists Scan for Weaknesses in the SARS-CoV-2 Spike Protein
Chris Baraniuk | Apr 9, 2020
The virus’s tool for prying open host cells is coated in a protective armor of sugar—but gaps may offer vulnerability to disruption by antibodies.
Possible Biological Explanations for Kids’ Escape from COVID-19
Possible Biological Explanations for Kids’ Escape from COVID-19
Anthony King | Mar 16, 2020
Infected children may harbor SARS-CoV-2 while showing less-severe symptoms than adults. Their young immune systems, ACE2 receptor levels, and even exposure to other coronaviruses might play a role in their resilience.