a white mouse huddles with several of her nine-day-old pups
In Vivo Gene Therapy Cures Infertility in Mice
Mice rendered infertile through ovary cell–targeting mutations gave birth to seemingly normal offspring through natural mating after a virus-based gene therapy was injected into their ovaries.
ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, ANYAIVANOVA
In Vivo Gene Therapy Cures Infertility in Mice
In Vivo Gene Therapy Cures Infertility in Mice

Mice rendered infertile through ovary cell–targeting mutations gave birth to seemingly normal offspring through natural mating after a virus-based gene therapy was injected into their ovaries.

Mice rendered infertile through ovary cell–targeting mutations gave birth to seemingly normal offspring through natural mating after a virus-based gene therapy was injected into their ovaries.

ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, ANYAIVANOVA

animal models

Image of brain cells showing pyramidal neurons in green, astrocytes in red, and microglia in blue
Replacing Microglia Treats Neurodegenerative Disease in Mice
Shawna Williams | Mar 17, 2022
Researchers find a way to wipe out the brain’s immune cell corps and send in new and improved versions.
Thomas Lozito poses with Donald, one of his mourning geckos.
Thomas Lozito Is Figuring Out How Lizards Rebuild
Connor Lynch | Feb 14, 2022
The University of Southern California bioengineer studies how lizards regrow their tails, with the goal of one day inducing regeneration in humans.
Stem Cell Transplant Treats Parkinson’s Disease in Monkeys
Roni Dengler, PhD | Feb 7, 2022
Personalized stem cells improved motor symptoms and depression signs in monkeys modeling Parkinson’s disease, paving the way for trials in human patients.
grey and purple cancer cells under a microscope
Cell Diversity Could Spell Trouble for Animal Models of Cancer
David Adam | Nov 19, 2021
Tracking human cancers in mice shows some unexpected cell changes that could undermine translational research.  
a leopard gecko with an unusually yellow body
“Lemon Frost” Leopard Geckos’ Cancers Similar to Human Melanomas
Christie Wilcox | Jun 24, 2021
The color morph’s bright yellow hue and its propensity for skin tumors both likely stem from a gene implicated in a dangerous form of human skin cancer, suggesting the animals could make an ideal model for studying the disease.
800x560-istock-1289090332
A New Model with Fully Functioning Blood Vessels Mimics Brain Cancer
Roni Dengler, PhD | Sep 10, 2021
A newly developed platform may one day replace cell culture and animal models to personalize cancer treatment.
The Many Model Systems of COVID-19
Abby Olena | Nov 4, 2020
Researchers turn to familiar model animals, along with some fresh strategies, to develop countermeasures against SARS-CoV-2 and investigate the biology of infection.
Michelle Gray Tracks Huntington’s in Different Brain Cells
Amanda Heidt | Oct 1, 2020
The University of Alabama at Birmingham neuroscientist aims to determine which cells are most important in prompting the disease’s initiation and progression.
Gaining Biological Insights into Brain Development Using Single Cell Technologies
Gaining Biological Insights into Brain Development Using Single Cell Technologies
The Scientist Creative Services Team in collaboration with 10x Genomics | Apr 12, 2021
Richard Smith will discuss the importance of ionic flux in in utero neuronal development.
stroke, animal model, mouse model, blood, cytokine storm, immune system, immune response, MMP-9, neutrophil
Blood Replacement Rescues Mice from Stroke Damage
Amanda Heidt | Aug 31, 2020
When mice that had suffered a stroke were given blood from a healthy donor, they experienced less tissue and neurological damage.
Noel Rose, Immunology, Autoimmune Disease, John Hopkins University, University at Buffalo, Microbiology, Antigens
Noel Rose, Who Demonstrated Autoimmunity Exists, Dies at 92
Amanda Heidt | Aug 10, 2020
The Johns Hopkins University researcher bucked the prevailing idea that the body would not launch an immune response against its own tissues, and in doing so established an entirely new scientific discipline.
The Epigenetic Origins of Allergy and Asthma
The Scientist Speaks Ep. 15 - The Epigenetic Origins of Allergy and Asthma
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Feb 26, 2021
Epigenetic marks acquired from environmental exposures throughout life influence human health and may even transcend generations.
Image of the Day: Biomimetic Arteries
Amy Schleunes | Apr 6, 2020
A newly engineered synthetic blood vessel offers a novel platform for developing drugs that treat high blood pressure.
Cells’ Response to SARS-CoV-2 Different from Flu, RSV
Abby Olena | Mar 31, 2020
The host transcriptional signature elicited by the coronavirus appears to be less robust and lacks the induction of key antiviral genes.
Improving Cardiac Cell Therapy Persistence
The Scientist Speaks Ep. 13 - The Long Haul: Improving Cardiac Cell Therapy Persistence
Niki Spahich, PhD | Jan 26, 2021
Researchers remuscularize the heart after cardiac infarction with stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and ready-made microvessels.
Animal Facilities Make Tough Decisions as Pandemic Closes Labs
Abby Olena | Mar 27, 2020
Many researchers have stopped breeding mice, reduced the size of colonies, and established contingency plans in case animal care staff get sick.
US Primate Centers Work to Protect Animals from COVID-19
Ashley Yeager | Mar 19, 2020
Rhesus macaques can be infected with SARS-CoV-2, leading primate center scientists to try to prevent outbreaks in their colonies, especially as experiments on coronavirus start.
A Ticking Time Bomb: Tracing the Origin and Spread of SARS-CoV-2
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Jul 30, 2020
Linda Saif will give a historical overview of SARS spillovers from animals to humans, and Neville Sanjana will describe recent work on a SARS-CoV-2 spike protein variant that increases human infectivity.
Rabbit Study May Hint at Origin of Female Orgasm in Humans
Catherine Offord | Oct 1, 2019
It could be a throwback to a mechanism that induces ovulation during sex, researchers propose, but not everyone thinks the results can be extrapolated to people.