Cover image of "Venomous" by Christie Wilcox, along with a headshot of the author and introduction title
Book Club Discussion of Venomous by Christie Wilcox
The Scientist Social Club sat down with the author.
ABOVE: The Scientist Social Club
Book Club Discussion of Venomous by Christie Wilcox
Book Club Discussion of Venomous by Christie Wilcox

The Scientist Social Club sat down with the author.

The Scientist Social Club sat down with the author.

ABOVE: The Scientist Social Club

biotherapeutics

3D illustration of a tapeworm infestation in a human intestine
Return of the Worms
Catherine Offord | Dec 1, 2021
Immunologists and parasitologists are working to revive the idea that helminths, and more specifically the molecules they secrete, could help treat allergies and autoimmune disease.
DNA
In Editing RNA, Researchers See Endless Possibilities
Christie Wilcox | Dec 1, 2021
RNA editing has been in DNA editing’s shadow for nearly a decade, but recent investments in the technology could bring it into the limelight.
Putting the Brakes on SARS-CoV-2: Neutralizing Antibodies
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Jul 6, 2020
Experts will discuss potential neutralizing antibodies currently under investigation for SARS-CoV-2 treatment.
Infographic showing endogenous adenosine enzymes acting on RNA (ADARs) edit genetic material in the cell by attaching to naturally occurring double-stranded RNAs, including mRNAs, and switching out A bases with I bases (left). Therapeutic RNA editing platforms based on this mechanism fall into one of two categories: either they use engineered enzymes, which generally consist of the editing part of the ADAR enzyme attached to another protein such as Cas13 that boosts specificity, alongside a guide RNA that targets the enzyme to the desired location (middle); or they consist of a guide RNA alone, which recruits an endogenous ADAR to edit the target sequence (right).
Infographic: RNA Editing Approaches
Christie Wilcox | Dec 1, 2021
RNA editing platforms leverage the natural activity of ADAR enzymes to make key changes to messenger RNAs before they are translated into proteins.
World’s Largest Cell and Gene Therapy Plant Opens
Catherine Offord | Apr 10, 2018
Lonza will employ more than 200 full-time staff to work at the Texas-based facility, the company says.
CAR-T Therapies Get $1 Billion Boost
Bob Grant | Jul 1, 2015
The biotech firm Celgene inks a huge collaboration deal with Juno Therapeutics to develop and commercialize new cancer immunotherapies.
Who Owns CRISPR?
Jenny Rood | Apr 3, 2015
With one US patent awarded and many other applications under consideration for the popular genome-editing technology, companies are adopting multiple strategies to navigate the complex intellectual property landscape.
The CAR T-Cell Race
Vicki Brower | Apr 1, 2015
Tumor-targeting T-cell therapies are generating remarkable remissions in hard-to-beat cancers—and attracting millions of dollars of investment along the way.
The Second Coming of RNAi
Eric Bender | Sep 1, 2014
Now showing clinical progress against liver diseases, the gene-silencing technique begins to fulfill some of its promises.
Virus Found in Sf9 Cell Line
Kerry Grens | May 22, 2014
A government lab finds a novel virus present in cell lines used for therapeutic production that were thought to be virus-free.
Wrestling with Recurrent Infections
Gayatri Vedantam and Glenn S. Tillotson | May 1, 2011
Clostridium difficile is evolving more robust toxicity, repeatedly attacking its victims, and driving the search for alternative therapies to fight the infection.