Caught on Camera
Caught on Camera
Selected Images of the Day from the-scientist.com
Caught on Camera
Caught on Camera

Selected Images of the Day from the-scientist.com

Selected Images of the Day from the-scientist.com

cardiomyocyte
Live-cell Imaging
Live-cell Imaging
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Aug 27, 2020
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Image of the Day: Taken to Heart
Image of the Day: Taken to Heart
Carolyn Wilke | Mar 14, 2019
By zooming in on a developing mouse heart, scientists are studying whether defects in vasculature contribute to a thin muscle wall.
Image of the Day: 3-D Nanofibers
Image of the Day: 3-D Nanofibers
The Scientist Staff, The Scientist Staff | Mar 7, 2018
Researchers created a nanofibrous scaffold to see how it supports cell growth.
Image of the Day: Transformers
Image of the Day: Transformers
The Scientist Staff | Feb 9, 2017
These facial muscle cells were genetically reprogrammed into beating heart cells.
The Fatty Acid–Ketone Switch
The Fatty Acid–Ketone Switch
Amanda B. Keener | May 31, 2016
In failing hearts, cardiomyocytes change their fuel preference.
Generating Cardiac Precursor Cells
Generating Cardiac Precursor Cells
Kerry Grens | May 31, 2016
Researchers derive cardiac precursors to form cardiac muscle, endothelial, and smooth muscle cells in mice.
In Failing Hearts, Cardiomyocytes Alter Metabolism
In Failing Hearts, Cardiomyocytes Alter Metabolism
Amanda B. Keener | May 31, 2016
While the heart cells normally burn fatty acids, when things go wrong ketones become the preferred fuel source.
Mysterious Mechanisms of Cardiac Cell Therapy
Mysterious Mechanisms of Cardiac Cell Therapy
Kerry Grens | Feb 4, 2016
Injections of progenitor cells into damaged rat hearts may improve function, but not because the implants themselves are creating new muscle.
Latest in Heart Stem Cell Debate
Latest in Heart Stem Cell Debate
Kerry Grens | Oct 26, 2015
Given the right environment, cKit+ cells from the mouse heart can develop into new cardiac muscle, according to a study.