Q&A: Global Insect Declines Due to “Death by a Thousand Cuts”
Q&A: Global Insect Declines Due to “Death by a Thousand Cuts”
University of Connecticut entomologist David Wagner speaks with The Scientist about his biggest concerns for global insect populations and recommendations for actions to help save these tiny but important creatures.
Q&A: Global Insect Declines Due to “Death by a Thousand Cuts”
Q&A: Global Insect Declines Due to “Death by a Thousand Cuts”

University of Connecticut entomologist David Wagner speaks with The Scientist about his biggest concerns for global insect populations and recommendations for actions to help save these tiny but important creatures.

University of Connecticut entomologist David Wagner speaks with The Scientist about his biggest concerns for global insect populations and recommendations for actions to help save these tiny but important creatures.

climate change
Science Advocates’ Wishlist for the Biden Administration
Science Advocates’ Wishlist for the Biden Administration
Amanda Heidt | Jan 7, 2021
From immigration reform to climate change amelioration, researchers and science policy advocates share their hopes for 2021 and beyond.
Tardigrades’ List of Super Powers Grows Ever Longer
Tardigrades’ List of Super Powers Grows Ever Longer
Ashley Yeager | Jan 1, 2021
Water bears can survive extreme temperatures, oxidative stress, UV radiation, and more, but as work in climate change biology shows, they’re not invulnerable to everything.
What’s Killing Killer Whales? Autopsies Reveal a Role for Humans
What’s Killing Killer Whales? Autopsies Reveal a Role for Humans
Ashley Yeager | Dec 16, 2020
Stephen Raverty of the Ministry of Agriculture in Canada and Joseph Gaydos of UC Davis speak with The Scientist about their recent study assessing the causes of orca deaths.
Editor&rsquo;s Picks of <em>The Scientist</em>&rsquo;s Best Infographics of 2020
Editor’s Picks of The Scientist’s Best Infographics of 2020
Jef Akst | Dec 15, 2020
This year’s most captivating illustrations tell stories from the micro scale—such as newborn neurons in the adult brain and bacteria in the infant gut—to the scale of entire ecosystems, including reintroduced predators and rising seas.
Q&amp;A: Science Has Been &ldquo;Resilient&rdquo; During Pandemic, Survey Finds
Q&A: Science Has Been “Resilient” During Pandemic, Survey Finds
Catherine Offord | Nov 24, 2020
Responses collected from around 25,000 academics reveal that 20 percent couldn’t do their work at all in the spring, but most had found ways to keep their research going.
Slideshow: Solving a Gray Whale Murder Mystery
Slideshow: Solving a Gray Whale Murder Mystery
Ashley Yeager | Nov 12, 2020
One way to investigate the record-setting deaths of the marine mammals is to perform autopsies on them, but researchers are also taking a close look at living whales for clues to what could be killing them.
Animal Movement Data Reveal Effects of Climate Change in Arctic
Animal Movement Data Reveal Effects of Climate Change in Arctic
Amanda Heidt | Nov 5, 2020
Environmental engineer Gil Bohrer discusses how long-term, large-scale tracking data can shed light on the unexpected ways animals are responding to changes in the Arctic.
Whale of a Problem
Whale of a Problem
The Scientist Staff | Nov 1, 2020
Here’ s what researchers know about the unusually high numbers of gray whale strandings on the US West Coast in recent years.
Infographic: Investigating Whale Strandings Along the North American Coast
Infographic: Investigating Whale Strandings Along the North American Coast
Ashley Yeager | Nov 1, 2020
Knock-on effects of melting sea ice in the Arctic may be to blame for a spate of gray whale deaths along their migration route from Mexico to Alaska.