Bacteria on the skin
Biotech Tries Manipulating the Skin Microbiome
Researchers are revealing the complexity of the microbial community living on the body—and paving the way for new bacteria-targeting treatments for acne and other dermatological conditions.
ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, DR_MICROBE
Biotech Tries Manipulating the Skin Microbiome
Biotech Tries Manipulating the Skin Microbiome

Researchers are revealing the complexity of the microbial community living on the body—and paving the way for new bacteria-targeting treatments for acne and other dermatological conditions.

Researchers are revealing the complexity of the microbial community living on the body—and paving the way for new bacteria-targeting treatments for acne and other dermatological conditions.

ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, DR_MICROBE

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