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Two parallel DNA strands against a black background.
Building Nerf Gun Blasters from DNA Bricks
Researchers ingeniously repurposed DNA to assemble a miniaturized blaster at the molecular level.
Building Nerf Gun Blasters from DNA Bricks
Building Nerf Gun Blasters from DNA Bricks

Researchers ingeniously repurposed DNA to assemble a miniaturized blaster at the molecular level.

Researchers ingeniously repurposed DNA to assemble a miniaturized blaster at the molecular level.

DNA origami

A syringe delivering a fleet of DNA nanorobots to a cancer cell.
Building Biomolecular Machines
Danielle Gerhard, PhD | Jan 1, 2024 | 2 min read
William Shih draws inspiration from origami and jigsaw puzzles in his quest to build bigger DNA nanorobots.
Yellow smiley faces on a black background
Coming Into the Fold: DNA Origami
Danielle Gerhard, PhD | Dec 4, 2023 | 9 min read
In 2006, Paul Rothemund transformed the field of DNA nanotechnology when he unveiled an innovative approach for making shapes and patterns from genetic material.
An artist’s rendering of a DNA-based virus trap, represented as gray rods in a short cone-shaped arrangement. One is coated with blue molecules, likely antibodies, that adhere to a virus target. Another image shows to traps coming together to capture a red coronavirus.
“Origami” DNA Traps Could Keep Large Viruses From Infecting Cells
Natalia Mesa, PhD | Jan 18, 2023 | 4 min read
By engineering structures out of DNA, scientists could potentially prevent larger viruses, like coronaviruses and influenza viruses, from interacting with cells.
Caught on Camera
The Scientist | Apr 1, 2018 | 2 min read
Selected Images of the Day from the-scientist.com
DNA Robots Target Cancer
Abby Olena, PhD | Feb 12, 2018 | 2 min read
Researchers use DNA origami to generate tiny mechanical devices that deliver a drug that cuts off the blood supply to tumors in mice.
Top Technical Advances in 2017
Shawna Williams | Dec 24, 2017 | 3 min read
The year’s most impressive achievements include new methods to extend CRISPR editing, patch-clamp neurons hands-free, and analyze the contents of live cells.
The Biggest DNA Origami Structures Yet
Abby Olena, PhD | Dec 6, 2017 | 3 min read
Three new strategies for using DNA to generate large, self-assembling shapes create everything from a nanoscale teddy bear to a nanoscale Mona Lisa.
Cargo-Sorting DNA Robots
Ruth Williams | Sep 14, 2017 | 3 min read
Autonomous molecules that collect, carry, and sort different genetic packages usher in a new era for nucleic-acid robotics. 
Twists and Turns
Mary Beth Aberlin | Jul 16, 2017 | 3 min read
New starring roles for nucleic acids
Contributors
The Scientist | Jul 16, 2017 | 3 min read
Meet some of the people featured in the July/August issue of The Scientist.
Building Nanoscale Structures with DNA
Arun Richard Chandrasekaran | Jul 16, 2017 | 10+ min read
The versatility of geometric shapes made from the nucleic acid are proving useful in a wide variety of fields from molecular computation to biology to medicine.
DNA Origami
The Scientist | Jul 16, 2017 | 1 min read
Will complex, folded synthetic DNA molecules one day serve as capsules to deliver drugs to cancer cells?
More-Stable DNA Origami
Tracy Vence | Jul 23, 2015 | 1 min read
Scientists build nanoscale mesh models of a rabbit and a human stick figure, among other things. 
Giant DNA Origami
Jef Akst | Sep 18, 2014 | 2 min read
Researchers create the largest 3-D DNA structures to date, many times bigger than previously constructed origami shapes.
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