frog
Origin of Frog-Killing Chytrid Fungus Found
Origin of Frog-Killing Chytrid Fungus Found
Ruth Williams | May 10, 2018
DNA evidence points to Asian amphibians as the source of a fatal disease that has been wiping out frogs across the globe.  
Studies Show How Cells Differentiate at Life’s Beginning
Studies Show How Cells Differentiate at Life’s Beginning
Shawna Williams | Apr 27, 2018
A trio of papers provide new insight into embryo development.
Frogs Fight Back From Fungal Attack
Frogs Fight Back From Fungal Attack
Ruth Williams | Mar 29, 2018
A decade after chytridiomycosis killed scores of amphibians in Panama, some species are recovering. New research indicates why.  
Tadpoles Keep Eating Because They Don’t Feel Full
Tadpoles Keep Eating Because They Don’t Feel Full
Catherine Offord | Mar 28, 2018
Baby frogs don’t develop the neural circuitry responsible for feeding inhibition until they begin metamorphosing into adults. 
Romeo the Frog
Romeo the Frog
The Scientist Staff | Feb 14, 2018
When forlorn mating calls went unanswered, biologists set him up with an online dating profile.
Image of the Day: Frog Leaps Away from Extinction 
Image of the Day: Frog Leaps Away from Extinction 
The Scientist Staff | Jan 3, 2018
A once critically endangered species of leaf frog has made a comeback. 
Frog Skin Yields Potent Painkillers, but None Clinic Ready
Frog Skin Yields Potent Painkillers, but None Clinic Ready
Shawna Williams | Jan 1, 2018
Decades after their discovery by bioprospectors, amphibian-derived analgesics continue to attract scientific attention.
Image of the Day: Tadpole Prism
Image of the Day: Tadpole Prism
The Scientist Staff | Nov 3, 2017
Scientists are making use of Xenopus tadpoles to study autism risk genes. 
How Poison Frogs Avoid Poisoning Themselves
How Poison Frogs Avoid Poisoning Themselves
Abby Olena | Sep 21, 2017
Amphibians resist their own chemical defenses with amino acid modifications in the sequence for a target receptor.
Image of the Day: Save the Frogs
Image of the Day: Save the Frogs
The Scientist Staff | Jun 23, 2017
Small but striking with its eyebrow-like horns, the 6-centimeter smooth horned frog (Proceratophrys boiei) was one of 453 amphibian species in Brazil assessed in a recent conservation study.