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a human neuron illuminated in bright green on a black background
Mitochondrial Metabolism Dictates Neurons’ Growth Rate
Altering the rate of respiration in mitochondria changes how fast neurons grow, making mouse neurons grow more like human ones and vice versa, a study finds.
Mitochondrial Metabolism Dictates Neurons’ Growth Rate
Mitochondrial Metabolism Dictates Neurons’ Growth Rate

Altering the rate of respiration in mitochondria changes how fast neurons grow, making mouse neurons grow more like human ones and vice versa, a study finds.

Altering the rate of respiration in mitochondria changes how fast neurons grow, making mouse neurons grow more like human ones and vice versa, a study finds.

metabolism
Turkey, mashed potatoes, stuffing, pumpkin pie and sides on a table
The Smell of Food Affects Metabolism in Fasting Mice
Shafaq Zia | Nov 18, 2022 | 3 min read
The odor prompted the animals’ fat cells to release lipids into circulation.
Illustration of green fluorescent bacterial cells.
Cocaine Use Creates Feedback Loop with Gut Bacteria: Mouse Study
Alejandra Manjarrez, PhD | Nov 1, 2022 | 3 min read
A jolt of norepinephrine in the mouse gut facilitates colonization by certain microbes, which in turn deplete glycine, enhancing cocaine-induced behaviors.
Discover the microbiome’s role in diabetes 
A Question of Balance: How the Gut Microbiome Influences Diabetes
The Scientist’s Creative Services Team | 1 min read
The presence of beneficial or detrimental microbes pulls the host toward health or disease.
Man with blue shirt and tie smiling at camera.
Pharmacologist and Olympian David Bailey Dies at 77
Lisa Winter | Oct 7, 2022 | 3 min read
He was best known for his discovery that grapefruit juice makes some medications less effective or potentially dangerous.
A composite headshot of Camila Behrensen (left) and Pablo Guzmán Palma (right)
Two Allegedly Murdered Scientists Found in Apartment Fire
Amanda Heidt | Oct 5, 2022 | 2 min read
Emergency responders arrived at a structure fire in Kansas City to find the two graduate students suffering from “apparent trauma” before they were declared dead at the scene.
Autophagy and Mitophagy in Neurodegeneration: A Deep Dive
Autophagy and Mitophagy in Neurodegeneration: A Deep Dive
The Scientist’s Creative Services Team and PerkinElmer | 1 min read
Robin Ketteler and Hélène Plun-Favreau discuss the importance of autophagy and mitophagy regulation in neurodegenerative diseases.
outline of a brain slice with white patch surrounded by teal
Astrocytes Feed Glioblastoma, Promoting Tumor Growth: Mouse Study
Patience Asanga | Oct 5, 2022 | 3 min read
Starving glioblastoma tumors of the cholesterol made by astrocytes could suppress brain cancer progression.
Illustration of pink and blue DNA molecules.
Historic Adaptations May Now Make Us Susceptible to Disease
Dan Robitzski | Sep 16, 2022 | 5 min read
Researchers made the find using an algorithm that purportedly distinguishes between mutations that were selected for and those that came along for the ride by coincidence, a feat that has long eluded scientists.
Staphylococcus aureus bacteria on the skin
The Scientist Speaks - Virulence Meets Metabolism: The Unique Evolution of Staphylococcus aureus
Niki Spahich, PhD | 1 min read
Anthony Richardson discusses what makes Staph especially dangerous for people with diabetes.
Adipose tissue under the microscope appearing as red blobs on a white background
Mouse Brains Appear to Eavesdrop on Their Fat
Alejandra Manjarrez, PhD | Sep 9, 2022 | 4 min read
For the first time, a team visualizes sensory nerves projecting into adipose tissue in mice and finds these neuronal cells may counteract the local effects of the sympathetic nervous system.
ant with wings on white background
Secret to Reproductive Ants’ Longevity Revealed
Patience Asanga | Sep 2, 2022 | 3 min read
Researchers say they've figured out how some reproductive ants live up to 30 years—far longer than workers.
Dogs under blanket together stock photo
A Nose by Any Other Name: Tracking the Scent of Tumor Metabolic Waste
Iris Kulbatski, PhD | 3 min read
The unique odor profiles of tumors can be used to develop diagnostic sensing tools.
Woman with buns and blue sweater chewing gum, smiling, and stretching it out of her mouth.
The Energetic Cost of Chewing May Have Shaped Hominin Evolution
Natalia Mesa, PhD | Aug 17, 2022 | 4 min read
The simple act of chewing gum can raise the body’s metabolic rate by as much as 15 percent, a study finds.
Newly hatched stinkbugs climbing over a pile of eggs.
Best Bugs: How E. coli Evolves into a Stinkbug Symbiont
Hannah Thomasy | Aug 15, 2022 | 3 min read
Experimental evolution study sheds new light on the origin of animal-microbe symbioses and what it takes for bacteria to support their insect hosts.
Examine Altered Glycobiology in Cancer
Examining Altered Glycobiology in Cancer
The Scientist’s Creative Services Team and Vector Laboratories | 1 min read
Changes to protein glycosylation play a major role in dictating cancer progression and prognosis, but could they also present biomarkers or therapeutic targets?
fuorescence microscopy of kidney tissue
Artificial Blood Breathes New Life Into Dead Pigs’ Cells
Andy Carstens | Aug 3, 2022 | 2 min read
A study’s authors say their oxygenating cocktail may lead to technologies that preserve organs in deceased people for longer periods for transplantation.
Micrograph of a beta cell, where insulin granules are shown as blue small balls, mitochondria are colored green, and a fraction of the cell nucleus appears in purple.
Diabetes Linked to Malnutrition Is Metabolically Unique: Study
Alejandra Manjarrez, PhD | Jun 16, 2022 | 5 min read
Results from a small sample of Indian males suggest that lean individuals with a history of malnutrition suffer from a distinct type of diabetes characterized by a defect in insulin secretion.
Christmas background
Helping the Immune System Keep its Cool
Aparna Nathan | 3 min read
Researchers found that lowering the temperature alleviates autoimmunity in mice.
Illustration of a Tyrannosaurus rex on a rock on a mountain
Most Dinosaurs Were Warm-Blooded After All
Catherine Offord | May 26, 2022 | 2 min read
Endothermy was widespread among both avian and non-avian dinosaurs, a study suggests, so the metabolic strategy is unlikely to account for birds’ survival through the mass extinction event that wiped out their dinosaur cousins.
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