Artist’s rendering of an early mammal called a mammaliamorph
Warm-Bloodedness in Mammals May Have Arisen in Late Triassic
Researchers mapped ear canal shape to body temperature to predict when ancestors of mammals first became endothermic.
Warm-Bloodedness in Mammals May Have Arisen in Late Triassic
Warm-Bloodedness in Mammals May Have Arisen in Late Triassic

Researchers mapped ear canal shape to body temperature to predict when ancestors of mammals first became endothermic.

Researchers mapped ear canal shape to body temperature to predict when ancestors of mammals first became endothermic.

morphology
The fossil tooth found in the Annamite Mountains in Laos
Ancient Tooth Could Be Clue in Denisovan Migration Mystery
Andy Carstens | May 18, 2022
The new fossil from Laos helps answer the question of how some people from Oceania carry DNA from the ancient hominin.
Image of not-to-scale renderings of the skulls of various primate species
Surface Area of Tooth Roots Predicts Primate Body Size
Maddie Bender | May 2, 2022
Researchers determine that a primate’s tooth root, and not just its crown, can yield reliable information about body size, but the relationship between root surface area and diet isn’t as clear.
Technique Talk: The Basics of Immunohistochemistry
The Scientist Creative Services Team
Learn about the fundamentals of immunohistochemistry in this workshop for better protocol development and troubleshooting.
shrew
Researchers Identify 14 New Shrew Species 
Chloe Tenn | Jan 5, 2022
The discovery, made on the island of Sulawesi in Indonesia, constitutes an exceptionally high number of new mammals to be described in a single paper.
two quails
Chromosomal Rearrangement Linked to Less Mobile Quail
Chloe Tenn | Dec 7, 2021
The Scientist interviews evolutionary biologist Carles Vilà about how a large genomic inversion detected in common quail affects the birds’ physical characteristics and migratory behaviors.
The man-of-war fish (Nomeus gronovii), a species of medusafish, near the tentacles of a siphonophore.
Medusafishes Are Grouped by Shared, Odd Traits: Study
Devin A. Reese | Dec 1, 2021
Shared features, such as thick, slimy skin and a throat filled with teeth, suggest that medusafishes are all related.
Infographic: Anatomical Construction by Cell Collectives
Michael Levin | Sep 1, 2020
Understanding this complex and still largely enigmatic process will pave the way for researchers to control the development of new morphologies.
How Groups of Cells Cooperate to Build Organs and Organisms
Michael Levin | Sep 1, 2020
Understanding biology’s software—the rules that enable great plasticity in how cell collectives generate reliable anatomies—is key to advancing tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | Sep 1, 2020
Meet some of the people featured in the September 2020 issue of The Scientist.
Image of the Day: Turtle Ant Soldiers
Amy Schleunes | Mar 12, 2020
Big heads come in handy when the social insects are tasked with defending their nest.
Martha Muñoz Uncovers the Drivers and Dampers of Biodiversity
Nicoletta Lanese | Nov 1, 2019
The Yale biologist says that organisms’ behavior, physiology, and morphology engage in a constant “evolutionary dance.”
Image of the Day: Brains and Braincases
Emily Makowski | Oct 18, 2019
The skull changed shape in different ways than the brain during evolution, according to a new comparative study.
Developing African cichlid stained to examine craniofacial structure
Image of the Day: Cichlid Cranium
Nicoletta Lanese | Jul 25, 2019
Maternal care for the fish alters the structure of their developing heads.
Image of the Day: Hanging Around
Sukanya Charuchandra | Jul 27, 2018
Hurricanes drive evolution in anole lizards, finds a new study.
The Topography of Teeth
Bob Grant | Nov 28, 2016
Intricate, digital maps of animals’ teeth, created using the same geographical tools used by mapmakers, may help researchers determine the diets of extinct species.
Brain Fold Tied to Hallucinations
Kerry Grens | Nov 19, 2015
A shorter crease in the medial prefrontal cortex is linked with a higher risk of schizophrenics experiencing hallucinations.
Homo naledi’s Hands and Feet
Bob Grant | Oct 6, 2015
Two new analyses of fossil remains from the recently discovered human relative suggest the species may have been uniquely adapted to both terrestrial and arboreal locomotion.
Finch Findings
Jenny Rood | Feb 12, 2015
Full genomes of Darwin’s Galápagos finches reveal a critical gene for beak shape and three overlooked species.
Genetic Data Clarify Insect Evolution
Kate Yandell | Nov 6, 2014
Researchers create a phylogenetic tree of insects by comparing the sequences of 1,478 protein-coding genes among species.