mice on wheel and ground
Exercise-Associated Protein Boosts Brain Function in Mice
A study that transfused plasma from active to inactive mice suggests the protein clusterin enhances cognition.
ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, JAMESBREY
Exercise-Associated Protein Boosts Brain Function in Mice
Exercise-Associated Protein Boosts Brain Function in Mice

A study that transfused plasma from active to inactive mice suggests the protein clusterin enhances cognition.

A study that transfused plasma from active to inactive mice suggests the protein clusterin enhances cognition.

ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, JAMESBREY
pathway
group of people
HHMI Kickstarts $2 Billion Initiative to Boost Diversity in STEM
Chloe Tenn | Nov 23, 2021
The Howard Hughes Medical Institute will invest the funds over 10 years across all stages of the STEM pipeline.
Photograph of a mouse covering his face with his paw.
Bless You: Mouse Model Reveals Molecular Pathway Behind Sneezing
Amanda Heidt | Oct 1, 2021
Researchers have identified specific cells and neuropeptides involved in mediating the sneeze response in mice exposed to allergens or chemical irritants such as capsaicin.
Illustration showing how a mouse study identifies the brain regions and specific signaling factors that regulate the sneeze response.
Infographic: The Neural Pathway of Sneezing
Amanda Heidt | Oct 1, 2021
A mouse study identifies the brain regions and specific signaling factors that regulate the sneeze response.
traced mouse neurons
Image of the Day: Brain Map
Nicoletta Lanese | Sep 6, 2019
Scientists traced 1,000 neurons through the mouse brain, uncovering new details about how the organ is wired.
RNA World 2.0
Jef Akst | Mar 1, 2014
Most scientists believe that ribonucleic acid played a key role in the origin of life on Earth, but the versatile molecule isn’t the whole story.
 
Cartographer of Metabolic Pathways Dies
Edyta Zielinska | Jun 4, 2012
A biochemist who mapped the ways in which molecular pathways interact passed away at age 96.
New Kind of Cellular Suicide
Jef Akst | Feb 23, 2012
Researchers identify a gene that drives a type of cellular suicide that differs from the more commonly observed apoptosis phenomenon.