Image of the Day: Red-Feathered Finches
Image of the Day: Red-Feathered Finches
Scientists uncover a potential reason why redder house finches have better health.
Image of the Day: Red-Feathered Finches
Image of the Day: Red-Feathered Finches

Scientists uncover a potential reason why redder house finches have better health.

Scientists uncover a potential reason why redder house finches have better health.

pigment
Lack of Diversity in Genetic Datasets is Risky for Treating Disease
Lack of Diversity in Genetic Datasets is Risky for Treating Disease
Ashley Yeager | Mar 21, 2019
Certain populations have been historically underrepresented in genome sequencing studies, but the NIH, private clinics, and 23andMe and other companies are trying to fix that.
Image of the Day: Roses Are Red, Poppies Are Too
Image of the Day: Roses Are Red, Poppies Are Too
Carolyn Wilke | Feb 14, 2019
New research shows how they get their deep hue.
Image of the Day: <em>Xenopus</em> Pigment
Image of the Day: Xenopus Pigment
The Scientist Staff | May 18, 2018
Researchers recently used CRISPR single-guide RNAs to alter genes involved in pigmentation in frog embryos.
Image of the Day: Living Color
Image of the Day: Living Color
The Scientist Staff, The Scientist Staff | Mar 8, 2018
Biodegradable pigments could be custom-grown by bacteria in the future, say researchers.  
Hungry Macrophages Keep Tattoos on Mice’s Skin
Hungry Macrophages Keep Tattoos on Mice’s Skin
Diana Kwon | Mar 7, 2018
A new study reveals that a constant stream of ink-gobbling immune cells helps hold tattoos in place.
Image of the day: Stylish Zebrafish
Image of the day: Stylish Zebrafish
The Scientist Staff | May 3, 2017
Zebrafish, Danio rerio, develop patterns of colorful stripes on their skin thanks to pigmented cells—dark melanophores, orange-gold xanthophores, and iridescent iridophores. 
Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes
Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes
Catherine Offord | Apr 30, 2017
Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.
“Redhead” Gene Variant Boosts Melanoma Risk
“Redhead” Gene Variant Boosts Melanoma Risk
Tanya Lewis | Jul 12, 2016
People without red hair who possess the variant are also more likely to develop this form of skin cancer, researchers report.
Rethinking Pre-Agricultural Humans
Rethinking Pre-Agricultural Humans
Tracy Vence | Jan 28, 2014
Analysis of a 7,000-year-old human genome suggests that Mesolithic people had relatively dark skin and had begun to evolve pathogen resistance characteristic of modern Europeans.