Stress Turns Hair Gray By Depleting Pigment-Producing Stem Cells
Stress Turns Hair Gray By Depleting Pigment-Producing Stem Cells
In mice, the fight-or-flight response overactivates the cells, causing a drop in their numbers, which leads to loss of hair color.
Stress Turns Hair Gray By Depleting Pigment-Producing Stem Cells
Stress Turns Hair Gray By Depleting Pigment-Producing Stem Cells

In mice, the fight-or-flight response overactivates the cells, causing a drop in their numbers, which leads to loss of hair color.

In mice, the fight-or-flight response overactivates the cells, causing a drop in their numbers, which leads to loss of hair color.

pigment
Image of the Day: Eyed Elater
Image of the Day: Eyed Elater
Amy Schleunes | Jan 23, 2020
The click beetle’s intricate false eyes cast a deep black color with the help of pigment-coated hairs.
Image of the Day: Black Cats
Image of the Day: Black Cats
Emily Makowski | Dec 19, 2019
Melanism in felines is both helpful and harmful.
Image of the Day: Ochre Paint
Image of the Day: Ochre Paint
Emily Makowski | Nov 26, 2019
This ancient red pigment came from underwater.
Image of the Day: Red-Feathered Finches
Image of the Day: Red-Feathered Finches
Emily Makowski | Sep 30, 2019
Scientists uncover a potential reason why redder house finches have better health.
Lack of Diversity in Genetic Datasets is Risky for Treating Disease
Lack of Diversity in Genetic Datasets is Risky for Treating Disease
Ashley Yeager | Mar 21, 2019
Certain populations have been historically underrepresented in genome sequencing studies, but the NIH, private clinics, and 23andMe and other companies are trying to fix that.
Image of the Day: Roses Are Red, Poppies Are Too
Image of the Day: Roses Are Red, Poppies Are Too
Carolyn Wilke | Feb 14, 2019
New research shows how they get their deep hue.
Image of the Day: <em>Xenopus</em> Pigment
Image of the Day: Xenopus Pigment
The Scientist Staff | May 18, 2018
Researchers recently used CRISPR single-guide RNAs to alter genes involved in pigmentation in frog embryos.
Image of the Day: Living Color
Image of the Day: Living Color
The Scientist Staff, The Scientist Staff | Mar 8, 2018
Biodegradable pigments could be custom-grown by bacteria in the future, say researchers.  
Hungry Macrophages Keep Tattoos on Mice’s Skin
Hungry Macrophages Keep Tattoos on Mice’s Skin
Diana Kwon | Mar 7, 2018
A new study reveals that a constant stream of ink-gobbling immune cells helps hold tattoos in place.
Image of the day: Stylish Zebrafish
Image of the day: Stylish Zebrafish
The Scientist Staff | May 3, 2017
Zebrafish, Danio rerio, develop patterns of colorful stripes on their skin thanks to pigmented cells—dark melanophores, orange-gold xanthophores, and iridescent iridophores. 
Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes
Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes
Catherine Offord | Apr 30, 2017
Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.
“Redhead” Gene Variant Boosts Melanoma Risk
“Redhead” Gene Variant Boosts Melanoma Risk
Tanya Lewis | Jul 12, 2016
People without red hair who possess the variant are also more likely to develop this form of skin cancer, researchers report.
Rethinking Pre-Agricultural Humans
Rethinking Pre-Agricultural Humans
Tracy Vence | Jan 28, 2014
Analysis of a 7,000-year-old human genome suggests that Mesolithic people had relatively dark skin and had begun to evolve pathogen resistance characteristic of modern Europeans. 
Fish of Many Colors
Fish of Many Colors
Abby Olena | Jan 23, 2014
Researchers seek insight into the pigmentation patterns of guppies and zebrafish.
Detailing Color Vision
Detailing Color Vision
Ruth Williams | Dec 6, 2012
Scientists engineer a spectrum of artificial pigments to understand how animals see in color.
Ruffling Dinosaur Feathers
Cristina Luiggi | Sep 15, 2011
Dinosaur and early bird feathers trapped in amber around 80 million years ago provide unprecedented insight into the evolution of plumage.
Early Bird Plumage
Early Bird Plumage
Cristina Luiggi | Sep 15, 2011
After rummaging through thousands of amber inclusions housed at the University of Alberta and the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Paleontology in Canada, researchers discovered 11 amber encased-feather fossils that provide the most detailed picture yet of early feather evolution.
Repainting Ancient Birds
Megan Scudellari | Jul 1, 2011
Using synchrotron rapid scanning X-ray fluorescence to map the distribution of trace metals in avian fossils over 120 million-year-old, researchers reconstruct the pigment patterns of their feathers—revealing some of the extinct birds' long-lost colors.
Color by Number Fossils
Megan Scudellari | Jun 30, 2011
Researchers map pigments in early bird fossils using preserved metallic residues.