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Cross-section of soil showing roots within and green plants above.
Getting to the Root of the Plant Microbiota
In plants, sugar transport and microbial community composition go hand in hand. 
Getting to the Root of the Plant Microbiota
Getting to the Root of the Plant Microbiota

In plants, sugar transport and microbial community composition go hand in hand. 

In plants, sugar transport and microbial community composition go hand in hand. 

transcriptomics

A man at the cow farm.
Moo-ve Aside Mice: Exploring Cow Models in Research
Laura Tran, PhD | Jun 25, 2024 | 3 min read
Humans have more in common with cows than mice when it boils down to bone marrow stem cells.
3D cubes showing letters representing the four DNA bases (adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine) and small DNA helices.
Discovering the Functions of Noncoding Sequence Variants
Niki Spahich, PhD | Jun 12, 2024 | 4 min read
Neville Sanjana explored noncoding genomic regions by combining pooled CRISPR screening and single cell sequencing.
Unlocking the Secrets within Cells Using Next Generation Sequencing
Unlocking the Secrets within Cells Using Next Generation Sequencing 
The Scientist | 1 min read
Next generation sequencing (NGS) core facility scientists and researchers discuss their latest work exploring novel cancer models and stem cells in space.
A Hydractinia polyp with stinging cells shown in red throughout the body and the tentacles.
With Neither Brains nor Brawn, Jellyfish and Relatives Developed Subcellular Weapons Instead
Hannah Thomasy, PhD | May 29, 2024 | 6 min read
Anna Klompen explained how cnidarian stinging cells harpooned their way into her heart and could help answer fundamental questions in biology.
Cartoon of a turtle inside of an ice cube.
The First Turtle Organoids
Danielle Gerhard, PhD | May 13, 2024 | 5 min read
Herpetology meets hepatology as scientists develop new tools for exploring how turtles survive freezing, oxygen-poor environments.
Journal club logo on purple background
The Scientist's Journal Club: Transcriptomics
The Scientist | 2 min read
Scientists discuss their latest findings on immune cell dynamics, neurodegenerative disease risk factors, and rare cell types obtained from bulk and single cell RNA sequencing experiments.
Two sister cells are seen in the foreground, while individual cells are seen behind them on a blue background.
Sister Cells Reveal Cancer’s Fate
Aparna Nathan, PhD | Apr 3, 2024 | 4 min read
A new method traces treatment resistant cells and predicts drugs that can make them more susceptible to cancer therapy.
Individual bacterial transcriptomes each plotted as a single point create a ring-shaped structure.
Rapidly Dividing Bacteria Coordinate Gene Expression and Replication
Kamal Nahas, PhD | Mar 15, 2024 | 4 min read
E. coli divides faster than it can replicate its genome, while simultaneously expressing its genes. Scientists recently revealed the intricate molecular coordination that makes this possible.
Team of Medical Research Scientists Collectively Working on a New Generation Experimental Drug Treatment. Laboratory Looks Busy, Bright and Modern.
Next-Generation Sequencing: A World without Limits
The Scientist and Illumina | 5 min read
Centralized core facilities and commercial service providers specializing in NGS provide expertise and training for researchers new to the method.
Rodents Offer New Insights Into the Diversity of Addiction
Aparna Nathan, PhD | Dec 1, 2023 | 4 min read
Molecular studies may point to underlying genetics and therapeutic targets.
Surreal illustration of the mind, represented by a person-shaped iceberg. A scuba diver illuminates the dark side of the iceberg underwater with a flashlight.
Toward Better Biomarkers for Schizophrenia
Deanna MacNeil, PhD | Aug 7, 2023 | 3 min read
Researchers scratch the surface of schizophrenia susceptibility by uncovering DNA methylation differences in neonatal blood samples.
summit
How Can Core Labs Help You Get Started with NGS?
The Scientist | 1 min read
Next-generation sequencing (NGS) core facility scientists and researchers new to NGS discuss their fruitful collaborations, highlighting how to receive expert help from genomics facilities.
A fluorescence microscopy image of placenta tissue made up of cells dyed blue, purple, pink and green on a black background.
The Cellular Intricacies of the Human Placenta
Ida Emilie Steinmark, PhD | Jul 5, 2023 | 2 min read
Rare samples saved 35 years ago helped researchers map gene expression and cell differentiation in first trimester placentas.
Human brain stock photo
New Insight into Brain Inflammation Inspires New Hope for Epilepsy Treatment
Deanna MacNeil, PhD | Jan 23, 2023 | 3 min read
Clinicians and researchers teamed up to investigate how inappropriate proinflammatory mechanisms contribute to the pathogenesis of drug-refractory epilepsy.
Gary Schroth, Vice President at Illumina
Modern Multiomics: Why, How, and Where to Next?
The Scientist and Illumina | 4 min read
A conversation with Illumina Distinguished Scientist and Vice President Gary Schroth about the present and future of multiomic technology and applications
Newborn baby rats lie in a basket
Mother’s Circadian Rhythms Mirrored in Fetal Rat Brains
Bianca Nogrady | Sep 12, 2022 | 2 min read
Before their own central clocks develop, the brains of fetal rats detect their mother’s metabolic cycle to help regulate the expression of certain genes.
Histological slide showing cancerous prostate tissue
2D Genetic Map of Prostate Cells Charts Cancer Growth
Holly Barker, PhD | Aug 23, 2022 | 4 min read
An in situ map of copy number variations in prostate tissue reveals that purportedly cancerous genomic changes frequently occur in the healthy tissue surrounding tumors.
Layered visual representation of multiomics
Integrate and Innovate with NGS and Multiomics
The Scientist and Illumina | 6 min read
Researchers across disciplines combine layers of discovery obtained with accessible NGS-based multiomics approaches.
Logo for The Scientist's 2022 Top 10 Innovations
Last Chance to Enter Our Annual Top 10 Innovations Contest
The Scientist | Jul 11, 2022 | 1 min read
There is only one week remaining to submit your new product to vie for a coveted spot in The Scientist’s 2022 competition.
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