salmonella bacteria 3d illustration
Salmonella Injection Helps the Mouse Immune System Kill Tumors
Nanoparticle-coated bacteria can capture tumor antigens and deliver them to immune cells, triggering a response that improved survival rates in mice.
ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, urfinguss
Salmonella Injection Helps the Mouse Immune System Kill Tumors
Salmonella Injection Helps the Mouse Immune System Kill Tumors

Nanoparticle-coated bacteria can capture tumor antigens and deliver them to immune cells, triggering a response that improved survival rates in mice.

Nanoparticle-coated bacteria can capture tumor antigens and deliver them to immune cells, triggering a response that improved survival rates in mice.

ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, urfinguss

bacteria

Illustration showing how following radiation therapy, which triggers the release of cancer-specific antigens, researchers injected Salmonella typhimurium bacteria covered in positively charged nano- particles near tumors in mice.
Infographic: Salmonella Shuttle Tumor Antigens to Immune Cells
Dan Robitzski | May 16, 2022
Nanoparticle-coated bacteria carry cancer-derived proteins to dendritic cells, enabling the immune system to launch a response in a mouse model.
Bacteria on the skin
Biotech Tries Manipulating the Skin Microbiome
Bianca Nogrady | Apr 18, 2022
Researchers are revealing the complexity of the microbial community living on the body—and paving the way for new bacteria-targeting treatments for acne and other dermatological conditions.
Discover how to avoid PCR inhibition
Crude Samples, Optimal Results
The Scientist Creative Services Team, MilliporeSigma | Apr 19, 2022
Discover how to avoid the PCR inhibitors that lurk in most nucleic acid samples.
Mosquito with red abdomen and white stripes on human skin
Mosquitoes Add Bacteria to Water to Help Larvae Grow: Preprint
Natalia Mesa | Apr 12, 2022
Pregnant mosquito females deploy the microbe Elizabethkingia to speed larval growth; the larvae, in turn, help the bacteria outcompete other strains.
illustration of a blood vessel
Bacteria in Tumors Promote Metastasis in Mice
Sophie Fessl | Apr 7, 2022
Microbes living inside cancer cells may help them spread to distant sites by enhancing the cells’ resistance to mechanical stress, a study shows.
Engineered Bacteria Make Tumors More T Cell-Friendly
Engineered Bacteria Make Tumors More T Cell-Friendly
Aparna Nathan | Apr 8, 2022
Microbes designed to produce specific immunomodulatory metabolites could give immunotherapy a boost.
Slime mold colony with volcano-like fruiting bodies
Cancer-like Slime Mold Growth Hints at Multicellularity’s Origins
Natalia Mesa | Apr 4, 2022
The poorly understood Fonticula alba, a relative of fungi and animals, hunts bacteria with a mechanism that resembles cancer and fungal growth.
Steam rises from a blue-gray hot spring, visible beyond a patch of reddish, rocky soil.
Soil Microbes Sacrifice Ribosomes in Response to Warming
Sophie Fessl | Mar 29, 2022
When soil heats up, microbes scale back protein synthesis machinery by making use of higher reaction rates that occur at higher temperatures, a study finds.
John Glass describes why researchers constructed a synthetic unicellular organism and how it unravels the secrets of evolution.
The Scientist Speaks - DIY Cells: Understanding Life with a Synthetic Minimal Cell
Sejal Davla, PhD | Feb 25, 2022
John Glass describes why researchers constructed a synthetic unicellular organism and how it unravels the secrets of evolution.
A stained tissue sample of metastatic pancreatic cancer
Tetanus Immunity Protects Mice Against Pancreatic Cancer
Amanda Heidt | Mar 24, 2022
Because most people are vaccinated against tetanus as children, delivering benign bacteria carrying a tetanus antigen into pancreatic tumors makes them visible to memory cells in the immune system, researchers report.
Howard Berg wearing glasses, looking at the camera with his lab in the background
Biophysicist Howard Berg Dies at 87
Lisa Winter | Mar 22, 2022
His research uncovered secrets of motility in E. coli.
Researchers target E. coli in the mouse gut
Modifying the Microbiome In Vivo, One Species or Gene at a Time
Niki Spahich, PhD | Feb 16, 2022
To manipulate the microbiome, researchers engineered a CRISPR delivery system that precisely targets bacteria in the mouse gut.
Natural sunbeams underwater through water surface in the Mediterranean sea on a seabed with neptune grass, Catalonia, Roses, Costa Brava, Spain
Marine Plant Partners with Microbes Like Terrestrial Plants Do
Rachael Moeller Gorman | Mar 14, 2022
A seagrass relies on symbiotic bacteria inside its roots to fix nitrogen. This is the first time scientists have demonstrated that this relationship occurs in a marine plant.
Tumor microbiome composite
Could Cancer’s Microbiome Help Diagnose and Treat the Disease?
Jef Akst | Mar 14, 2022
A growing appreciation of the bacterial assemblages that live within tumors has researchers striving to understand and capitalize on their role.
38447-ts-antibiotic-resistance-webinar-banner-jp800x560
Understanding Our Enemies: Identifying Mechanisms of Antibiotic Resistance
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Aug 3, 2021
Researchers sample and sequence bacteria from biological and environmental sources to learn how to overcome selective pressure
Infographic showing how a new bacteria species called <em>Candidatus Celerinatantimonas neptuna</em> lives in seagrass and how it provides the plant with nitrogen
Infographic: Nitrogen-Fixing Bacteria Live Inside Seagrass Roots
Rachael Moeller Gorman | Mar 14, 2022
Researchers can now explain how some marine plants obtain their nitrogen.
Illustration showing microbial signatures of cancer in the body
Infographic: Putting Cancer’s Unique Microbiomes to Use
Jef Akst | Mar 14, 2022
From diagnosis to tracking treatment responses, bacteria and other microbes in the blood, gut, and tumors of cancer patients may provide helpful hints for improving their care.
Manipulating the Microbiome to Manage Disease
The Scientist Creative Services Team in collaboration with Tecan | May 28, 2021
Cammie Lesser will discuss how she turns a probiotic into a drug-delivering machine, while Andrew Y. Koh will describe the connection between the gut microbiota and cancer immunotherapy efficacy.
Bacteriophage (green) attacking a bacterium (orange)
Bacteria Set Off Viral “Bombs” Inside Neighbors
Natalia Mesa | Mar 7, 2022
A study finds some E. coli can deploy a chemical called colibactin to reawaken long-dormant viruses inside bacteria, causing destruction.