Phil Hartmeyer, NOAA Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary
Longer Days Led to Oxygen Buildup on Early Earth: Study
Longer Days Led to Oxygen Buildup on Early Earth: Study
Researchers propose that some of the planet’s earliest photosynthesizers benefited from a slowing of the Earth’s rotation that allowed them to produce a surplus of oxygen and paved the way for more complex life.  
Longer Days Led to Oxygen Buildup on Early Earth: Study
Longer Days Led to Oxygen Buildup on Early Earth: Study

Researchers propose that some of the planet’s earliest photosynthesizers benefited from a slowing of the Earth’s rotation that allowed them to produce a surplus of oxygen and paved the way for more complex life.  

Researchers propose that some of the planet’s earliest photosynthesizers benefited from a slowing of the Earth’s rotation that allowed them to produce a surplus of oxygen and paved the way for more complex life.  

bacteria
Understanding Our Enemies: Identifying Mechanisms of Antibiotic Resistance
Understanding Our Enemies: Identifying Mechanisms of Antibiotic Resistance
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Aug 3, 2021
Researchers sample and sequence bacteria from biological and environmental sources to learn how to overcome selective pressure
Infographic: Maternal Microbiota Has Lasting Effects on Offspring
Infographic: Maternal Microbiota Has Lasting Effects on Offspring
Carolyn A. Thomson, Kathy D. McCoy | Aug 1, 2021
Work in rodents shows that the bacteria living in a mother’s gut can produce immunomodulatory metabolites and influence the production of maternal antibodies—both of which can affect her offspring’s development.
The Role of Mom’s Microbes During Pregnancy
The Role of Mom’s Microbes During Pregnancy
Carolyn A. Thomson, Kathy D. McCoy | Aug 1, 2021
Bacteria in the gut influence the production of antibodies and themselves secrete metabolites. In a pregnant woman, these compounds may influence immune development of her fetus.
Bacterial Infections Disrupt Flies’ Sense of Smell
Bacterial Infections Disrupt Flies’ Sense of Smell
Abby Olena | Jul 21, 2021
The temporary loss of olfaction stops the flies from eating any more of whatever it is that made them sick.
Human Protein Dissolves Bacterial Membranes
Human Protein Dissolves Bacterial Membranes
Abby Olena | Jul 15, 2021
The protein, apolipoprotein L3, destroys invading microbes by acting as a detergent in the cytosol.
Infographic: Microbiome-Driven Adaptations in Animals
Infographic: Microbiome-Driven Adaptations in Animals
Catherine Offord | Jul 1, 2021
Researchers are using experiments and observational studies to look for host genetic variation that could be partly determined by the gut microbiota.
Identifying a Killer, 1895
Identifying a Killer, 1895
Catherine Offord | Jul 1, 2021
A contaminated ham put bacteriologist Émile Pierre-Marie van Ermengem on the path to discovering the microbe that produces botulinum toxin.
The Inside Guide: The Gut Microbiome’s Role in Host Evolution
The Inside Guide: The Gut Microbiome’s Role in Host Evolution
Catherine Offord | Jul 1, 2021
Bacteria that live in the digestive tracts of animals may influence the adaptive trajectories of their hosts.
Signs of Ancient Microbial Life Abundant in Earth’s Crust: Study
Signs of Ancient Microbial Life Abundant in Earth’s Crust: Study
Catherine Offord | Jun 3, 2021
Researchers report chemical and molecular signatures of microbial activity from millions of years ago in mineral samples from abandoned mines in Sweden and nearby countries.
Infographic: What Are Bacterial Nanotubes?
Infographic: What Are Bacterial Nanotubes?
Sruthi S. Balakrishnan | Jun 1, 2021
Unlike other cellular appendages, bacterial nanotubes are made solely of lipids and can connect the cytoplasm of different microbial species.
Leader of the Pack, 1903–1994
Leader of the Pack, 1903–1994
Lisa Winter | Jun 1, 2021
Ruth Ella Moore had a trailblazing career, overcoming barriers of racism and sexism as she pursued her interest in microbiology.
What’s the Deal with Bacterial Nanotubes?
What’s the Deal with Bacterial Nanotubes?
Sruthi S. Balakrishnan | Jun 1, 2021
Several labs have reported the formation of bacterial nanotubes under different, often contrasting conditions. What are these structures and why are they so hard to reproduce?
Infographic: Sources of Variation in Bacterial Nanotube Studies
Infographic: Sources of Variation in Bacterial Nanotube Studies
Sruthi S. Balakrishnan | Jun 1, 2021
Differences in how researchers prepare and image samples can lead to discrepancies in their results.
Many Bacteria and Archaea Promoters Work Forward and Backward
Many Bacteria and Archaea Promoters Work Forward and Backward
Jack J. Lee | May 28, 2021
New analyses find that divergent transcription, in which one promoter directs the expression of two adjacent genes oriented in opposite directions, is conserved across all domains of life.
Manipulating the Microbiome to Manage Disease
Manipulating the Microbiome to Manage Disease
The Scientist Creative Services Team in collaboration with Tecan | May 28, 2021
Cammie Lesser will discuss how she turns a probiotic into a drug-delivering machine, while Andrew Y. Koh will describe the connection between the gut microbiota and cancer immunotherapy efficacy.
Cities Have Distinct Microbial Signatures: Study
Cities Have Distinct Microbial Signatures: Study
Lisa Winter | May 27, 2021
The researchers found thousands of species not previously documented.
A Connected Community: The Rise of Microbiome Research
A Connected Community: The Rise of Microbiome Research
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Apr 30, 2021
Explore how microbes shape health, disease, and the world beyond
Some Viruses Use an Alternative Genetic Alphabet
Some Viruses Use an Alternative Genetic Alphabet
Abby Olena | Apr 29, 2021
In a trio of studies, researchers follow up on a 40-year-old finding that certain bacteriophages replace adenine with so-called diaminopurine, perhaps to avoid host degradation.
Microbiologist Thomas Brock Dies at 94
Microbiologist Thomas Brock Dies at 94
Lisa Winter | Apr 23, 2021
Brock’s discovery of a thermophile bacteria at Yellowstone National Park in 1966 eventually enabled the development of PCR.