salmonella bacteria 3d illustration
Salmonella Injection Helps the Mouse Immune System Kill Tumors
Nanoparticle-coated bacteria can capture tumor antigens and deliver them to immune cells, triggering a response that improved survival rates in mice.
ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, urfinguss
Salmonella Injection Helps the Mouse Immune System Kill Tumors
Salmonella Injection Helps the Mouse Immune System Kill Tumors

Nanoparticle-coated bacteria can capture tumor antigens and deliver them to immune cells, triggering a response that improved survival rates in mice.

Nanoparticle-coated bacteria can capture tumor antigens and deliver them to immune cells, triggering a response that improved survival rates in mice.

ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, urfinguss

cancer immunotherapy

Illustration showing how following radiation therapy, which triggers the release of cancer-specific antigens, researchers injected Salmonella typhimurium bacteria covered in positively charged nano- particles near tumors in mice.
Infographic: Salmonella Shuttle Tumor Antigens to Immune Cells
Dan Robitzski | May 16, 2022
Nanoparticle-coated bacteria carry cancer-derived proteins to dendritic cells, enabling the immune system to launch a response in a mouse model.
A stained tissue sample of metastatic pancreatic cancer
Tetanus Immunity Protects Mice Against Pancreatic Cancer
Amanda Heidt | Mar 24, 2022
Because most people are vaccinated against tetanus as children, delivering benign bacteria carrying a tetanus antigen into pancreatic tumors makes them visible to memory cells in the immune system, researchers report.
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Training Immune Cells to Be Cancer Killers
Aparna Nathan | Nov 12, 2021
A career-altering experience as a cancer patient motivated one researcher to design more potent immunotherapies.
Salmonella (pink) invading a human epithelial cell (yellow)
Modified Salmonella Revs Immune Response, Combats Tumors in Mice
Natalia Mesa | Feb 3, 2022
When coated with positively charged particles, the bacteria shuttled antigens out of tumors and activated the immune system, a study finds.
knitted pink heart with a mended hole
CAR T Cells Mend Broken Mouse Hearts
Sophie Fessl | Jan 6, 2022
Specialized immune cells generated in vivo reduce cardiac scar tissue in mice, a new study shows.
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Can mRNA Vaccine Momentum Propel Tumor Immunotherapies?
Aparna Nathan | Nov 12, 2021
A guide to mRNA-based cancer vaccines and where they’re headed next
Illustration of clear cells with orange nuclei, Toxoplasma gondii, on colorful background
Turning Toxoplasma Against Cancer
Annie Melchor | Jan 3, 2022
Several research groups have found that Toxoplasma gondii infection can ramp up antitumor immune responses in mice. Can the single-cell parasite be used to develop safe treatments for humans?
fingertips with pills on them
Over-the-Counter Antihistamines Could Help Against Cancer
Alejandra Manjarrez | Nov 24, 2021
The binding of histamine with one of its receptors within the tumor environment makes cancer cells more resistant to immunotherapy, according to a new study. Blocking that binding could improve responses to treatment.
Boosting CAR T Cell Therapy for Solid Tumors
The Scientist Creative Services Team in Collaboration with IsoPlexis | Apr 5, 2021
Katie McKenna will discuss how oncolytic viral therapy enhances CAR-T cell killing of cancer cells.
brain scan showing uptake of tratuzumab into tumor (arrow)
Sound Waves Aid Brain Tumor Treatment
Ruth Williams | Oct 13, 2021
In a small clinical study, focusing ultrasound beams on tumors in patients’ brains helped open the blood-brain barrier to facilitate drug delivery.
CAR Macrophages Tackle Challenges in Solid Cancer Treatment
Amanda Heidt | Mar 26, 2021
Following on the success of CAR T cells used to treat cancers of the blood, researchers have launched a Phase 1 clinical trial of genetically modified macrophages to target solid tumors.
The Scientist Speaks Podcast - Episode 10
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Oct 28, 2020
Cancer Immunotherapy: CRISPR Reveals Targets In Vivo
an illustration of a mix of different bacteria
Fecal Transplant Could Boost Immunotherapy to Treat Melanoma
Shawna Williams | Feb 12, 2021
The results from two Phase 1 trials bolster the case that the gut microbiome plays a role in response to the drugs.
CAR T cells, oncolytic virus, CD19, mouse model, solid cancer, liquid cancer, tumor, immune response, immunotherapy, T cell, treatment
Immunotherapy Combo Reduces Solid Tumors in Mice
Amanda Heidt | Sep 9, 2020
When tumor cells are infected with an oncolytic virus carrying a modified CD19 gene, they become targets for CAR T cells engineered to recognize this molecular marker.
The Scientist's LabTalk Podcast - Episode 1
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Sep 11, 2020
Myeloid Cells in Cancer and Science Advocacy: A Conversation with Dr. Miriam Merad
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | Jul 13, 2020
Meet some of the people featured in the July/August 2020 issue of The Scientist.
Harnessing Stem Cell–Like T Cells to Better Fight Cancer
Daniel E. Speiser and Werner Held | Jul 13, 2020
Better understanding the CD8+ T cells already present in tumors could be key to making immunotherapies work for more patients.
Adoptive Cell Therapy Summit
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Aug 24, 2020
Join us to learn about adoptive cell therapies from leading experts in the field of cancer immunology. 
Natural Killer Cell Therapies Catch Up to CAR T
Bianca Nogrady | Apr 1, 2020
There’s a new cell-based cancer immunotherapy on the block.