illustration of blue cells with exosomes budding off of them and floating away
Nanoparticles Spur Mouse Immune System to Attack Cancer
A study finds that engineered exosomes are effective in mice, but their potential use in humans raises safety questions.  
Nanoparticles Spur Mouse Immune System to Attack Cancer
Nanoparticles Spur Mouse Immune System to Attack Cancer

A study finds that engineered exosomes are effective in mice, but their potential use in humans raises safety questions.  

A study finds that engineered exosomes are effective in mice, but their potential use in humans raises safety questions.  

cancer therapeutics
A small, brown mouse runs on a narrow, miniature treadmill
How Exercise Helps Mice Fight Pancreatic Cancer
Dan Robitzski | Jun 15, 2022
A study reveals a molecular pathway linking exercise to an amped-up immune response to pancreatic cancer and greater responsiveness to treatment.
line illustration of DNA with single-strand break
Cancer Cells Break Own DNA to Defend Against Radiation
Sophie Fessl | Apr 28, 2022
Self-inflicted DNA breaks let the cells hit pause on repair of radiation-induced DNA damage, giving them time to recover, an in vitro study shows.
istock
Streamlining CAR T Cell Workflows with Automation
The Scientist Creative Services Team in collaboration with Thermo Fisher Scientific
Automated counterflow centrifugation systems accelerate cell therapy workflow processes while maintaining cell yields and efficacy.
A stained tissue sample of metastatic pancreatic cancer
Tetanus Immunity Protects Mice Against Pancreatic Cancer
Amanda Heidt | Mar 24, 2022
Because most people are vaccinated against tetanus as children, delivering benign bacteria carrying a tetanus antigen into pancreatic tumors makes them visible to memory cells in the immune system, researchers report.
Man in lab coat sitting at a lab bench looking at small, stoppered beaker.
Cancer Researcher Donald Pinkel Dies at Age 95
Natalia Mesa | Mar 18, 2022
Unsatisfied by how treatments for childhood leukemia failed to prevent the disease’s return, Pinkel combined them all—and virtually cured the disease.
Boosting CAR T Cell Therapy for Solid Tumors
The Scientist Creative Services Team in Collaboration with IsoPlexis
Katie McKenna will discuss how oncolytic viral therapy enhances CAR-T cell killing of cancer cells.
illustration of blue cancer cell extending tendrils around itself
Janus-Faced Neutrophils
Sophie Fessl | Mar 2, 2022
The immune cells facilitate healing, but they may also help tumors metastasize to the lungs after injury, a study in mice finds.
Salmonella (pink) invading a human epithelial cell (yellow)
Modified Salmonella Revs Immune Response, Combats Tumors in Mice
Natalia Mesa | Feb 3, 2022
When coated with positively charged particles, the bacteria shuttled antigens out of tumors and activated the immune system, a study finds.
Checking Checkpoints for Treating Cancer
The Scientist Creative Services Team
Researchers devise strategies to improve checkpoint inhibitor therapy and predict patient response.
Artist’s rendering of brain fog: a bright blue drawing of a brain sits inside of a pink drawing of a head in profile surrounded by miscellaneous shapes
Brain Fog Caused by Long COVID and Chemo Appear Similar
Dan Robitzski | Jan 28, 2022
Data from mouse models for mild coronavirus infections and human tissue samples offer further evidence that it doesn’t take a severe infection—or even infection of brain cells at all—to cause long-term neurological symptoms.
knitted pink heart with a mended hole
CAR T Cells Mend Broken Mouse Hearts
Sophie Fessl | Jan 6, 2022
Specialized immune cells generated in vivo reduce cardiac scar tissue in mice, a new study shows.
Surveillance Gaps: How Cancer Arises
The Scientist Creative Services Team
Surveillance Gaps: How Cancer Arises
Illustration of clear cells with orange nuclei, Toxoplasma gondii, on colorful background
Turning Toxoplasma Against Cancer
Annie Melchor | Jan 3, 2022
Several research groups have found that Toxoplasma gondii infection can ramp up antitumor immune responses in mice. Can the single-cell parasite be used to develop safe treatments for humans?
fingertips with pills on them
Over-the-Counter Antihistamines Could Help Against Cancer
Alejandra Manjarrez | Nov 24, 2021
The binding of histamine with one of its receptors within the tumor environment makes cancer cells more resistant to immunotherapy, according to a new study. Blocking that binding could improve responses to treatment.
Perfecting Dose Response Assays
The Scientist Creative Services Team
Jeffrey Weidner and Eric Niederkofler will discuss strategies for optimizing dose response assays.
grey and purple cancer cells under a microscope
Cell Diversity Could Spell Trouble for Animal Models of Cancer
David Adam | Nov 19, 2021
Tracking human cancers in mice shows some unexpected cell changes that could undermine translational research.  
brain scan showing uptake of tratuzumab into tumor (arrow)
Sound Waves Aid Brain Tumor Treatment
Ruth Williams | Oct 13, 2021
In a small clinical study, focusing ultrasound beams on tumors in patients’ brains helped open the blood-brain barrier to facilitate drug delivery.
Blocking Cancer Progression and Shrinking Tumors with Antibody-ligand Traps
The Scientist Creative Services Team
LuZhe Sun will discuss TGFβ signaling during cancer progression and how researchers can target this pathway.
white and yellow colonies growing on a petri dish
Gut Fungi Hamper Radiation Therapy in Mice with Cancer
Rachael Moeller Gorman | Aug 11, 2021
Depleting intestinal fungi allows radiation to effectively fight cancer, likely because the microbes influence the antitumor immune response.