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How a Prominent Mexican Scientist Wound Up a Spy for Russia
Hector Cabrera Fuentes, a renowned cardiovascular researcher, collaborated with Russian intelligence agents for more than a year, prosecutors said.
How a Prominent Mexican Scientist Wound Up a Spy for Russia
How a Prominent Mexican Scientist Wound Up a Spy for Russia

Hector Cabrera Fuentes, a renowned cardiovascular researcher, collaborated with Russian intelligence agents for more than a year, prosecutors said.

Hector Cabrera Fuentes, a renowned cardiovascular researcher, collaborated with Russian intelligence agents for more than a year, prosecutors said.

cardiovascular disease
Black and white photograph of Stamler looking into the camera.
“Father of Preventive Cardiology” Jeremiah Stamler Dies at 102
Lisa Winter | Feb 18, 2022 | 3 min read
He was among the first to identify lifestyle factors that contribute to cardiovascular disease.
Deborah Nickerson
Genome Pioneer Deborah Nickerson Dies at 67
Amanda Heidt | Feb 9, 2022 | 3 min read
The University of Washington researcher leveraged data from the Human Genome Project to identify genes underlying various health conditions and advance precision medicine.
Human Data Era
The Human Data Era Q&A
The Scientist Creative Services Team and Amgen | 1 min read
In this webinar event, Vivienne Watson from Amgen will answer questions that delve deeper into the entire podcast series.
A white coat-wearing doctor holds the results of an EKG test in one hand and traces over them with a pen in the other hand
Doctors and Researchers Probe How COVID-19 Attacks the Heart
Dan Robitzski | Jan 12, 2022 | 8 min read
Experts have a decent grasp on how COVID-19 impacts cardiovascular health in the near term. The implications of long COVID, however, remain mysterious.
Abstract geometric heart with plexus effect on blue background
Man Receives Transplanted Heart from Genetically Modified Pig
Shawna Williams | Jan 10, 2022 | 3 min read
The procedure, performed last Friday, is a milestone in a long effort to boost the number of organs available for safe transplantation.
Human Data Era
The Human Data Era - A Special 4-Part Podcast Series
The Scientist Creative Services Team and Amgen | 1 min read
Explore the potential of human data in drug research and development.
Two emergency responders stand near a barricade on a street in New York
Q&A: Health of 9/11 First Responders 20 Years Later
Amanda Heidt | Sep 7, 2021 | 5 min read
The Scientist spoke with Rachel Zeig-Owens, the director of epidemiology for the World Trade Center Health Program, about what scientists have learned after two decades of studying illness and disease among survivors.
An illustration of a woman in bed unable to sleep. The bedside clock reads 2:30. Her brain and heart are glowing.
Infographic: Pathways from Noise to Cardiovascular Damage
Thomas Münzel and Omar Hahad | Jun 1, 2021 | 2 min read
Research in mice and humans points to oxidative stress and inflammation as likely drivers of noise-induced health effects such as hypertension and heart disease.
Large-Scale Proteomics Drives Disease Research
Driving Disease Research and Therapeutics with Large-Scale Proteomics
The Scientist Creative Services Team and SomaLogic | 1 min read
Explore how technology enables large-scale proteomics for biomarker discovery and clinical application.
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | Jun 1, 2021 | 4 min read
Meet some of the people featured in the June 2021 issue of The Scientist.
Clip art of a crane, car, and plane flying over a city outside the window of two people in bed not sleeping, with a starry night background
How Environmental Noise Harms the Cardiovascular System
Thomas Münzel and Omar Hahad | Jun 1, 2021 | 10+ min read
Sound from cars, aircraft, trains, and other man-made machines is more than just annoying. It increases the risk of cardiovascular disease.
Beyond Acute Respiration: SARS-CoV-2's Effects on Long-Term Physiology
The Scientist Creative Services Team | 1 min read
John Connolly and Masataka Nishiga discuss the effects of SARS-CoV-2 on the neurological and cardiovascular systems.
johnson & johnson johnson&johnson j&j janssen covid-19 vaccine vaccination pandemic adenovirus vector blood clot side effect cerebral venous sinus thrombosis CVST sars-cov-2 coronavirus pandemic astrazeneca
US Health Authorities Ask for Pause in J&J COVID-19 Vaccination
Kerry Grens | Apr 13, 2021 | 2 min read
The FDA and CDC are investigating a handful of reports of blood clots that occurred several days after people received the one-and-done shot.
breast cancer, cardiovascular disease, heart attack, chemotherapy, cancer, cancer risk, women's health, oncology
Heart Attack Elevates Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence: Study
Amanda Heidt | Jul 13, 2020 | 4 min read
Mice that experienced heart attacks underwent a large-scale shift in their immune systems that allowed cancer to flourish, perhaps explaining the observation in patients.
Could Statins Reduce the Severity of COVID-19?
Ashley Yeager | Jun 12, 2020 | 7 min read
The cholesterol-lowering drugs quell inflammation and reverse endothelial tissue damage, hints that they might curb the body’s excessive immune response to SARS-CoV-2 infection.
stroke coronavirus covid-19 young patients blood clots large vessel occlusion mt. sinai hospital new york city
Strokes Reported Among Some Middle-Aged COVID-19 Patients
Kerry Grens | Apr 27, 2020 | 2 min read
Early reports from hospitals document a spike in large vessel blockages, especially among people in their 30s and 40s who tested positive for the coronavirus.
Why Some COVID-19 Cases Are Worse than Others
Katarina Zimmer | Feb 24, 2020 | 7 min read
Emerging data as well as knowledge from the SARS and MERS coronavirus outbreaks yield some clues as to why SARS-CoV-2 affects some people worse than others.
Image of the Day: Bionic Heart
Amy Schleunes | Jan 30, 2020 | 1 min read
A bioengineered heart made of pig and synthetic tissues beats like the real thing.
cardiac stem cell therapy immune system macrophage
Activation of the Immune System Underlies Cardiac Cell Therapies
Ruth Williams | Nov 27, 2019 | 4 min read
A study in mice reveals that stem cell transplants, currently in clinical trials, may not actually require the cells.
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