Man leaning against a bookshelf
Sheldon Krimsky, Leader in Science Policy and Ethics, Dies at 80
Krimsky warned strenuously about the corrupting power of money in science.
ABOVE: Alonso Nichols/Tufts University
Sheldon Krimsky, Leader in Science Policy and Ethics, Dies at 80
Sheldon Krimsky, Leader in Science Policy and Ethics, Dies at 80

Krimsky warned strenuously about the corrupting power of money in science.

Krimsky warned strenuously about the corrupting power of money in science.

ABOVE: Alonso Nichols/Tufts University

ethics

People holding signs
NYU Defends Against Backlash Over Potential Hire
Amanda Heidt | Apr 29, 2022
Hundreds of the school’s faculty, students, and trainees are protesting its consideration of David Sabatini, who left his previous posts after alleged sexual misconduct.
A photo of a skeleton on a black background
Ancient DNA Boom Underlines a Need for Ethical Frameworks
Amanda Heidt | Jan 27, 2022
The field of ancient DNA, which combines archaeology and anthropology with cutting-edge genetics, is requiring scientists to have frank conversations about when research is justified and who it benefits.
colored microscope photo of xenobot
“Xenobot” Living Robots Can Reproduce
Chloe Tenn | Dec 2, 2021
Biological robots made from frog cells can replicate by smooshing loose cells into new robots—a reproduction method not seen in any other organism.
Great Minds Don't Think Alike
Book Excerpt from Great Minds Don't Think Alike
Marcelo Gleiser | Dec 1, 2021
In the introduction, editor Marcelo Gleiser establishes the need for dialogue across the science-humanities divide in academia.
Great Minds Don't Think Alike
Opinion: Bridging the Intellectual Divide
Marcelo Gleiser | Dec 1, 2021
To solve modern problems, we must integrate the sciences and the humanities and think across these traditionally disparate disciplines.
Hela cells colored in blue
Henrietta Lacks Estate Sues Thermo Fisher over HeLa Cell Line
Catherine Offord | Oct 4, 2021
Attorneys for the family seek compensation for the company’s sale of cells cloned from tissue removed without consent by doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital 70 years ago.
Illustration of a person confused looking at a computer
When Researchers Sound the Alarm on Problematic Papers
Shawna Williams | Sep 1, 2021
Finding and reporting an irregularity in a published study can lead people down an unexpected path.
cartoon showing a hand taking a tool to a double-helix of DNA to represent gene editing
WHO Releases New Recommendations on Human Genome Editing
Annie Melchor | Jul 12, 2021
The guidance comes after two years of consulting with hundreds of stakeholders, including indigenous peoples, religious leaders, patient groups, and scientists.
photo of a researcher looking in a microscope fertilising an egg via intracytoplasmic sperm injection.
Human Stem Cell Research Guidelines Updated
Ruth Williams | May 26, 2021
Removal of the 14-day limit for culturing human embryos is one of the main changes in the revised recommendations from the International Society for Stem Cell Research.
Pain Researcher Quits Academia, Takes Lab Home with Him
Jef Akst | May 1, 2021
After resigning from the University of New England last year, Geoffrey Bove continues to study the effects of massage on rats in a facility he set up in his house.
fetal cells, fetal stem cells, policy, Biden administration, Trump administration, NIH
NIH Reverses Limits on Human Fetal Tissue Research
Amanda Heidt | Apr 19, 2021
A new ruling removes the requirement that grants and proposals using the material receive approval from an ethical review board, reverting to the process in place before 2019.
ethics, bioethics, brain organoid, chimera, cell transplant, Q&A, report, NIH, NAS, neuroscience, Techniques, disease & medicine, immunology, psychiatric conditions
New Report Dissects Ethics of Emerging Human Brain Cell Models
Amanda Heidt | Apr 12, 2021
The National Academies’ report touches on ethical issues raised by new technologies such as brain organoids and human-animal chimeras, and suggests that current regulatory oversight is sufficient.
EPA Purges Trump Administration’s Science Advisors
Lisa Winter | Apr 1, 2021
The agency says that to “reset” the advisory boards and bolster “scientific integrity,” more than 40 advisors appointed during former President Donald Trump’s tenure have been let go.
Opinion: Facing Assumptions About the Duality of Human and Animal
Melanie Challenger | Apr 1, 2021
Since Darwin published his landmark work on natural selection, we’ve understood that we’re animals. But that doesn’t mean we really believe it.
Moncef Slaoui Fired by GSK Amid Sexual Harassment Claims
Lisa Winter | Mar 24, 2021
The former GlaxoSmithKline executive had led the US government’s Operation Warp Speed COVID-19 vaccine program during the Trump administration.
Respected Medical Geneticist Sir Peter Harper Dies at 81
Catherine Offord | Feb 2, 2021
The Cardiff University researcher was famous both for his work on genetic disorders and for his documentation of the history of his field.
Steps to End “Colonial Science” Slowly Take Shape
Ashley Yeager | Jan 1, 2021
Scientists from countries with fewer resources are pushing collaborators from higher-income countries to shed biases and behaviors that perpetuate social stratification in the research community.
A Challenge Trial for COVID-19 Would Not Be the First of Its Kind
Jef Akst | Oct 8, 2020
Although scientists debate the ethics of deliberately infecting volunteers with SARS-CoV-2, plenty of consenting participants have been exposed to all sorts of pathogens in prior trials.
Scientist as Subject
Amanda Heidt | Oct 1, 2020
In the past, it was not uncommon for researcher to test their experimental therapeutics and vaccines on themselves. Some even volunteered to be exposed to pathogen-carrying vectors.