Miami skyline of skyscrapers next to ocean
How a Prominent Mexican Scientist Wound Up a Spy for Russia
Hector Cabrera Fuentes, a renowned cardiovascular researcher, collaborated with Russian intelligence agents for more than a year, prosecutors said.
ABOVE: © iStock.com, photosvit
How a Prominent Mexican Scientist Wound Up a Spy for Russia
How a Prominent Mexican Scientist Wound Up a Spy for Russia

Hector Cabrera Fuentes, a renowned cardiovascular researcher, collaborated with Russian intelligence agents for more than a year, prosecutors said.

Hector Cabrera Fuentes, a renowned cardiovascular researcher, collaborated with Russian intelligence agents for more than a year, prosecutors said.

ABOVE: © iStock.com, photosvit

heart disease

Black and white photograph of Stamler looking into the camera.
“Father of Preventive Cardiology” Jeremiah Stamler Dies at 102
Lisa Winter | Feb 18, 2022
He was among the first to identify lifestyle factors that contribute to cardiovascular disease.
knitted pink heart with a mended hole
CAR T Cells Mend Broken Mouse Hearts
Sophie Fessl | Jan 6, 2022
Specialized immune cells generated in vivo reduce cardiac scar tissue in mice, a new study shows.
An illustration shows circular red blood cells running into a yellow cholesterol blockage in a transverse section of an artery on a blue and purple background
Genetic Variant Discovered in Amish Protects from Heart Disease
Abby Olena | Dec 2, 2021
Researchers link a missense mutation in the B4GALT1 gene to lower levels of LDL cholesterol and the blood clotting factor fibrinogen.
An illustration of a woman in bed unable to sleep. The bedside clock reads 2:30. Her brain and heart are glowing.
Infographic: Pathways from Noise to Cardiovascular Damage
Thomas Münzel, Omar Hahad | Jun 1, 2021
Research in mice and humans points to oxidative stress and inflammation as likely drivers of noise-induced health effects such as hypertension and heart disease.
Broken Heart Syndrome Linked to the Brain
Amanda Heidt | Jun 1, 2021
A chronically stressed amygdala can prime the heart to overreact to acute stress events, a new study shows.
Clip art of a crane, car, and plane flying over a city outside the window of two people in bed not sleeping, with a starry night background
How Environmental Noise Harms the Cardiovascular System
Thomas Münzel, Omar Hahad | Jun 1, 2021
Sound from cars, aircraft, trains, and other man-made machines is more than just annoying. It increases the risk of cardiovascular disease.
Image of the Day: Biomimetic Arteries
Amy Schleunes | Apr 6, 2020
A newly engineered synthetic blood vessel offers a novel platform for developing drugs that treat high blood pressure.
Blood Pressure Meds Point the Way to Possible COVID-19 Treatment
Ashley Yeager | Apr 2, 2020
There is little evidence that antihypertensive drugs worsen COVID-19, and scientists are instead exploring the idea that such medications—or their downstream effects—may actually alleviate symptoms.
Image of the Day: Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy
Amy Schleunes | Feb 24, 2020
Scientists identify a potential biomarker for predicting the progression of a deadly cardiac disease.
Infographic: How Splicing of Genes Can Affect Heart Health
Gabrielle M. Gentile, Hannah J. Wiedner, Emma R. Hinkle, and Jimena Giudice | Jan 13, 2020
The way in which mRNA transcripts are cut can influence the elasticity of the organ.
Novartis’s $9.7 Billion Purchase Includes Novel PCSK9 Inhibitor
Emily Makowski | Nov 25, 2019
The pharmaceutical firm is buying The Medicines Company, which recently devoted its efforts into developing the cholesterol-lowering medication.
Genes that Are Harmless on Their Own Cause Disease When Combined
Chia-Yi Hou | Sep 1, 2019
A case study of a family demonstrates that different genetic mutations from the two parents cause severe heart disease symptoms in the children.
an illustration of the inside of a blood vessel with a buildup of plaque
Gene Mutation Could Explain Humans’ High Risk of Heart Attack
Shawna Williams | Jul 23, 2019
Mutating a gene called CMAH in mice so it’s nonfunctional, as in humans, upped the animals’ chances of developing heart disease, a study finds.
Sweetened Drinks Linked to Higher Mortality Risk
Catherine Offord | Mar 19, 2019
While sugary beverages seem to be the worst offenders, artificially sweetened drinks might also be associated with health problems, an observational study suggests.
Genome Collector: A Profile of Charles Rotimi
Anna Azvolinsky | Oct 1, 2018
The NIH epidemiologist has worked to ensure genetic health and population genetics studies contain data from African—not just European—populations.
Gene Editing Reduces Monkeys’ Cholesterol
Ashley Yeager | Jul 10, 2018
The results could lead to a treatment to lower cholesterol in patients with hypercholesterolemia.
Cardiac Cell Transplants Help Monkeys’ Hearts
Ashley Yeager | Jul 2, 2018
The organ’s blood-pumping capacity improved with the infusion of cells, a study shows.
Opinion: Deductive Science Is Needed for Public Health
Giuseppe Carruba | Jun 27, 2018
Big data and empirical approaches to understanding diseases provide a limited picture of pathogenesis.
Sweet Tooth Gene Tied to Less Body Fat
Kerry Grens | Apr 11, 2018
A study of more than 450,000 people finds a certain genetic variant associated with eating more carbs is linked to a thicker waist and higher blood pressure, but less fat.