fluorescence microscopy of kidney tissue
Artificial Blood Breathes New Life Into Dead Pigs’ Cells
A study’s authors say their oxygenating cocktail may lead to technologies that preserve organs in deceased people for longer periods for transplantation.
Artificial Blood Breathes New Life Into Dead Pigs’ Cells
Artificial Blood Breathes New Life Into Dead Pigs’ Cells

A study’s authors say their oxygenating cocktail may lead to technologies that preserve organs in deceased people for longer periods for transplantation.

A study’s authors say their oxygenating cocktail may lead to technologies that preserve organs in deceased people for longer periods for transplantation.

hemoglobin
Photo of Makio Murayama
Handmade Hemoglobin, 1912-2012
Dan Robitzski | Aug 1, 2022
Makio Murayama, a Japanese-American biochemist who was turned away from the Manhattan Project due to his heritage, rose to prominence for his work uncovering the link between the structure of hemoglobin and the mechanisms of sickle cell disease.
A bright, illuminated, yellow cluster of spheres, representing a mutated base pair, stands out from a double helix of deep red base pairs joined by blue hydrogen bonds
Study: Sickle Cell Mutation Driven by Pressure, Not Random Chance
Dan Robitzski | Mar 17, 2022
New research finds that the appearance of the HbS mutation, which protects against malaria but leads to sickle cell disease when present in two copies, was more common in sperm samples from men in Ghana, where malaria risk is high, than Europeans.
Stuart Orkin
In Our Blood: A Profile of Stuart Orkin
Anna Azvolinsky | Jul 15, 2019
By unraveling the molecular underpinnings of inherited blood disorders, the Boston Children’s Hospital researcher has provided the basis for therapies now being tested for beta-thalassemia and sickle cell disease.
Image of the Day: Hungry Hookworms
The Scientist Staff and The Scientist Staff | Mar 26, 2018
Researchers discover anti-malarials called quinolones can halt the development of the parasites, offering a potential therapeutic avenue.
More Success Fixing Sickle Cell Gene with CRISPR
Kerry Grens | Nov 9, 2016
Researchers say they have sufficient in vitro and animal data to apply for human testing.
Many Evolutionary Paths Lead to Same Bird Trait
Anna Azvolinsky | Oct 20, 2016
Diverse genetic changes lead to remarkably similar hemoglobin adaptations of diverse bird species, a study finds. 
CRISPR Corrects Sickle Cell-Causing Gene in Human Cells
Kerry Grens | Oct 13, 2016
Once implanted in mice, the edited stem cells produced normal hemoglobin.
Antimalarial Drug Mechanism Explained
Karen Zusi | Dec 29, 2015
Artemisinin targets multiple parasite proteins after being activated by the iron in heme cofactors.
CRISPR Corrects Blood Disorder Gene
Kerry Grens | Aug 5, 2014
Scientists use the genome-editing technique to fix a disease-causing mutation in human cell lines.
Clamping Cords Too Soon?
Kate Yandell | Jul 16, 2013
A review study indicates that clamping umbilical cords immediately after birth, rather than waiting a few minutes, may increase the risk of iron and hemoglobin deficiency in infants.
Mammoth Blood Gives Hope for Cloning?
Bob Grant | Jun 3, 2013
Some question the supposition that viable cells and DNA will be found in a remarkably preserved carcass, purported to harbor fresh muscle tissue and flowing blood.