Microbes in Human Fetuses Spur Immune Development
Microbes in Human Fetuses Spur Immune Development
Researchers identify live bacteria in fetal guts, skin, lungs, and placentas that activate memory T cells, indicating that early exposure to microbes could help educate the developing immune system.
Microbes in Human Fetuses Spur Immune Development
Microbes in Human Fetuses Spur Immune Development

Researchers identify live bacteria in fetal guts, skin, lungs, and placentas that activate memory T cells, indicating that early exposure to microbes could help educate the developing immune system.

Researchers identify live bacteria in fetal guts, skin, lungs, and placentas that activate memory T cells, indicating that early exposure to microbes could help educate the developing immune system.

microbes
SARS-CoV-2 Antigens Leaking from Gut to Blood Might Trigger MIS-C
SARS-CoV-2 Antigens Leaking from Gut to Blood Might Trigger MIS-C
Alejandra Manjarrez | Jun 3, 2021
Researchers find traces of SARS-CoV-2 in the stool and blood of kids with the post–COVID-19 inflammatory disorder, and signs of increased intestinal permeability.
Signs of Ancient Microbial Life Abundant in Earth’s Crust: Study
Signs of Ancient Microbial Life Abundant in Earth’s Crust: Study
Catherine Offord | Jun 3, 2021
Researchers report chemical and molecular signatures of microbial activity from millions of years ago in mineral samples from abandoned mines in Sweden and nearby countries.
Sailing the Seas in Search of Microbes
Sailing the Seas in Search of Microbes
Shawna Williams | Jun 1, 2021
Projects aimed at collecting big data about the ocean’s tiniest life forms continue to expand our view of the seas.
Fecal Microbiota Transplantation is Poised for a Makeover
Fecal Microbiota Transplantation is Poised for a Makeover
Shawna Williams | Jun 1, 2021
With multiple microbiota therapeutics in the pipeline for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection, clinicians foresee a shift in treatment options for the condition.
Cities Have Distinct Microbial Signatures: Study
Cities Have Distinct Microbial Signatures: Study
Lisa Winter | May 27, 2021
The researchers found thousands of species not previously documented.
Can Single Cells Learn?
Can Single Cells Learn?
Catherine Offord | May 1, 2021
A controversial idea from the mid-20th century is attracting renewed attention from researchers developing theories for how cognition arises with or without a brain.
Infographic: Investigating Whether Single Cells Learn
Infographic: Investigating Whether Single Cells Learn
Catherine Offord | May 1, 2021
Historical and modern experiments have hinted that unicelluar organisms can learn from their experiences, but the idea still has its critics.
A Connected Community: The Rise of Microbiome Research
A Connected Community: The Rise of Microbiome Research
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Apr 30, 2021
Explore how microbes shape health, disease, and the world beyond
Many Deep-Sea Microbes Invisible to Mammalian Immune System
Many Deep-Sea Microbes Invisible to Mammalian Immune System
Abby Olena | Mar 12, 2021
In a new study, human and mouse cells recognized only one in five bacterial species collected from more than a mile below the Pacific Ocean’s surface.
Researchers Propose Automating the Naming of Novel Microbes
Researchers Propose Automating the Naming of Novel Microbes
Jef Akst | Mar 1, 2021
With modern technologies unearthing novel bacterial and archaeal species by the dozens, hundreds, or even thousands, manually naming them all is no longer practical, scientists say.
Retrons Help Bacteria Defend Themselves from Phages: Study
Retrons Help Bacteria Defend Themselves from Phages: Study
Catherine Offord | Feb 1, 2021
The mysterious DNA sequences appear to help bacterial cells spot when they’ve been infected with viruses—and prompt those cells to self-destruct.
Microbes Find Their Niche in Underwater Shipwrecks
Microbes Find Their Niche in Underwater Shipwrecks
Jef Akst | Nov 1, 2020
Early investigations of the microbial communities in and around sunken boats reveal that there are patterns to where bacteria settle.
Nitrogen-Fixing Microbes Found in Antarctic Sea
Nitrogen-Fixing Microbes Found in Antarctic Sea
Shawna Williams | Oct 28, 2020
The discovery puts a nail in the coffin of a long-held assumption about the limits of where the essential process can occur.
Fecal Transfer from Moms to Babies After C-Section: Trial Results
Fecal Transfer from Moms to Babies After C-Section: Trial Results
Ruth Williams | Oct 1, 2020
Tiny doses of maternal poo mixed with breast milk and given to Cesarean-born infants makes their gut microbiota resemble those of babies born vaginally.
Virus Hunters: Searching for Therapeutic Phages in a Drug Resistant World
Virus Hunters: Searching for Therapeutic Phages in a Drug Resistant World
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Sep 21, 2020
Researchers Jason Gill and Paul Turner will discuss their work on bacteriophage therapy to treat drug resistant bacterial infections.
Scientists Awaken Deep Sea Bacteria After 100 Million Years
Scientists Awaken Deep Sea Bacteria After 100 Million Years
Amanda Heidt | Jul 29, 2020
The microbes had survived on trace amounts of oxygen and were able to feed and multiply once revived in the lab.
A Little Help From My Friends: Lessons Learned From Microbiome Metagenomics
A Little Help From My Friends: Lessons Learned From Microbiome Metagenomics
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Jul 2, 2020
Heather Jordan and Jennifer Wargo will discuss how metagenomics studies help uncover new and medically relevant functions of the human microbiome.
A Citizen Scientist Makes Her Mark in Microbiome Research
A Citizen Scientist Makes Her Mark in Microbiome Research
Amy Schleunes | Jun 1, 2020
The BioCollective, a company that transforms whole stool samples into microbial metadata, is developing the US’s first national microbiome reference material.
Scientists Clone SARS-CoV-2 Genome with Quick Yeast-Based Method
Scientists Clone SARS-CoV-2 Genome with Quick Yeast-Based Method
Ruth Williams | May 6, 2020
The use of yeast artificial chromosomes has enabled the rapid genetic reconstruction of the novel coronavirus.